The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Posts tagged “Lawrence County Alabama

Another memory to cherish…

in the form of a photograph.

The photograph below is that of George Washington Terry, son of George Washington Terry, Sr and Matilda Ann Rodgers Terry.

George W Terry was born 15 June 1862 and died in December of 1938. He had three known wives. He first married at age 19 to Vina J Lange, called “Vinnie” by family. That marriage was performed on 1 August 1881 in Lawrence County, Alabama. Vinnie Terry died in 1898.

George Washington Terry next married at age 39 to Sarah V Watson, called “Sallie” by family. They married 16 January 1902 in Lawrence County, Alabama. Sallie Watson Terry died 14 February 1914 in Lawrence County, Alabama.

George W Terry then married 23 June 1914 to Margaret Ann Glass. The family called her “Maggie”.  There were two boys enumerated in their household at one time. They were Edgar D Beavers and Henry Glass. It is presumed that they were her sons by prior marriages.

There were a number of children born to George Washington Terry during all three marriages. Sorting the children out has been a daunting task. But unless documents offer any corrections in the future, the following children were born to the mothers as follows:

Vina J “Vinnie” Lang Terry had the following children: Mattie Lee Terry 1884 – 1974 who married a Letson; Luther Terry 1887 – 1954; Harvey Terry (may have been the brother named Hive) born 1890; Nevia Terry born 1893; Weaver (daughter) born 1894; and Clyde Terry 1900- before 1910.

Sarah V “Sallie” Watson had the following children: Alfred Louis (Lewis) Terry 1902-1967; Evelyn Terry born 1904; Eva L Terry born 1906; Betty M Terry born 1908; Nettie Mae Terry 1908-1964;  and Austin Wilburn Terry 1910-1991.

Margaret Ann “Maggie” Glass Terry had the following children: Cynthia Margaret Terry 1916-1939; Ussery Cornelius Terry 1917-1987; Mary Terry born ca 1920; Maudie Terry born ca 1922; and Bluitt Terry ca 1926. And possibly she was the mother of the two boys enumerated in their household, Edgar D Beavers and Henry Glass both listed as born 1904.

It is such a delight to see what our ancestors looked like. George Washington Terry was a handsome man.

Photo of George Washington Terry born 1862


Elmo Tolbert World War II enlistment record…

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 about Elmo Tolbert

Name: Elmo Tolbert
Birth Year: 1924
Race: White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Country: Alabama
State of Residence: Alabama
County or City: Lawrence
Enlistment Date: 21 Feb 1945
Enlistment State: Alabama
Enlistment City: Fort McClellan
Branch: No branch assignment
Branch Code: No branch assignment
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: Grammar school
Civil Occupation: General farmers
Marital Status: Married [to Louise Jones]
Height: 00
Weight: 100

Roy Peebles World War II enlistment record…

Roy was a son of James Walter Peebles and May Belle Owens Peebles. James Walter Peebles was a brother to George Washington Peebles (Mage). His brothers who also enlisted were Ell and Grant Peebles.

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 about Roy Peebles

Name: Roy Peebles
Birth Year: 1916
Race: White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Country: Alabama
State of Residence: Alabama
County or City: Lawrence
Enlistment Date: 27 Feb 1941
Enlistment State: Alabama
Enlistment City: Fort McClellan
Branch: Branch Immaterial – Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code: Branch Immaterial – Warrant Officers, USA
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: Grammar school
Civil Occupation: Farm hands, general farms
Marital Status: Single, without dependents
Height: 68
Weight: 156
Related articles

Ell Peebles World War II enlistment record…

Ell was a son of James Walter Peebles who was a son of George Henry Peebles (Grandpa Dick) and brother to George Washington Peebles (Mage).

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 about Ell Peebles

Name: Ell Peebles
Birth Year: 1924
Race: White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Country: Alabama
State of Residence: Alabama
County or City: Lawrence
Enlistment Date: 9 Jan 1943
Enlistment State: Alabama
Enlistment City: Fort McClellan
Branch: Branch Immaterial – Warrant Officers, USA
Branch Code: Branch Immaterial – Warrant Officers, USA
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: 1 year of high school
Civil Occupation: Semiskilled occupations in production of industrial chemicals
Marital Status: Single, with dependents
Height: 71
Weight: 164
Related articles

Sidney GRANT Peebles’ World War II enlistment record…

U.S. World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938-1946 about Sidney G Peebles

Name: Sidney G Peebles
Birth Year: 1911
Race: White, citizen (White)
Nativity State or Country: Alabama
State of Residence: Alabama
County or City: Lawrence
Enlistment Date: 31 Mar 1944
Enlistment State: Georgia
Enlistment City: Fort Mcpherson Atlanta
Branch: No branch assignment
Branch Code: No branch assignment
Grade: Private
Grade Code: Private
Term of Enlistment: Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law
Component: Selectees (Enlisted Men)
Source: Civil Life
Education: 1 year of high school
Civil Occupation: Skilled warehousing, storekeeping, handling, loading, unloading, and related occupations, n.e.c.
Marital Status: Married
Height: 66
Weight: 166

So far away but so near in function…

were the kitchens of the plantations in our area of northern Alabama. Or at least the Pond Springs Plantation and the Cunningham Plantation seemed very far from each other in the horse and buggy days. One commonalty of the two plantation homes were their kitchens.


Pond Springs Plantation,  also known as the Joseph Wheeler Home, Hillsboro, Lawrence County, Alabama

The three houses now on the property include a dogtrot or double log cabin possibly built before 1818, a somewhat later two-story Federal-style house (1830’s), and the main wing built around 1872.

This photograph by Alex Bush, 1935 shows the kitchen at Pond Springs located in Lawrence County, Alabama in the Wheeler Basin community was typical of the kitchens of many plantations. Pond Springs originally was owned by the Hickmans who apparently sold their interest in the plantation, known as Pond Spring, to Colonel Benjamin Sherrod, partner in the initial kitchen at pond springspurchase of the property.

Colonel Sherrod was born in Halifax County, NC, migrated first to Georgia, then about 1818 settled in Alabama where he established several cotton plantations throughout the Tennessee River Valley. Sherrod’s own home, Cotton Garden, was located north of the nearby town of Courtland, and it appears that his eldest son, Felix, and his family lived at the Pond Spring place.

The owner of more than 300 slaves, Benjamin Sherrod was an early Alabama tycoon, with extensive and varied business interests. He also served as chief promoter and stockholder of the Tuscumbia, Courtland, and Decatur Railroad, one of the earliest west of the Appalachians.

The Pond Spring plantation passed from Sherrod’s son, Felix, to a grandson, also named Benjamin Sherrod. In 1859, Benjamin married Daniella Jones of nearby Caledonia plantation, and at the time of his premature death in 1861, the plantation became Daniella’s. Daniella (known as Ella) Jones Sherrod, born in 1841,  was the daughter of Richard Harrison Jones and his wife, Lucy Early, who was the daughter of Georgia Governor Peter Early. The Jones family had moved from Georgia to Alabama in 1822.

After Benjamin Sherrod’s death, Daniella returned to her parents’ home. Caledonia, where in the fall of 1863, she met General Joseph Wheeler while he and his troops camped near the Jones home. They were married following the War in 1866. Wheeler moved his family to New Orleans after the War Between the States for four years, then relocated back at Pond Springs where they raised their family of children.


Cunningham Plantation, now known as Barton Hall, located near Cherokee in Colbert County, Alabama

This reproduction of a drawing by Harry J. Frahn, 1937 of the plan of the kitchen at the Cunningham Plantation in Colbert County, Alabama seems typical of plantation kitchens of that day.

Drawing of the kitchen of Cunningham Plantation.These kitchens both, at Pond Springs and at the Cunningham Plantation, include a bedroom, presumably for the cook and her family. Thus confined, the cook was never relieved from work as she faced constant demands from the main house. John White, a former slave from Texas who lived in a kitchen- quarter, remembered that his proximity to the Big House made him a frequent target of his owner’s temper.

English: Cunningham Plantation (Barton Hall), ...
.


Whatever happened to the passion of the people…

Lawrence County Courthouse, Courthous...

Lawrence County Alabama Courthouse in Moulton, year 1880.

it used to be there even before government education and control was rampantly destroying the fabric of our country. I can remember even as a child how very few if any had anything for gubment help of any kind except antipathy, even down to the safe keeping of the votes and the location of government buildings.

Our forefathers had spunk. They were well armed. They basically did not mess with anyone and would not tolerate anyone messing with them or theirs. I do not see that spirit today. It seems that America is now all hat and  no cattle. Americans today are all so afraid of not being politically correct. I came across an interesting story from way back in 1893 from Lawrence County, Alabama. It was published in the Vernon Courier, a newspaper in Lamar County. The date of publication was 10 August 1893. The article reads as such:

COUNTY SEAT WAR – A Birmingham Special of the 11th says: News comes from Lawrence county of a red hot controversy which has grown out of the election in that county for the location of the court house.

The court house has always been located at Moulton, which is in the mountainous region away from the railroad. Courtland is a growing town on the Memphis and Charleston railroad, wanted the court house, and as a result of it an election was ordered to be held last Monday to decide the location. The peculiar part about it is that the result of the election has never been determined so far as known, both sides claiming the victory.
The mountaineers rallied to the support of Moulton, while the people residing in the Tennessee valley favored Courtland. The sheriff was favorable to Courtland and the probate judge was for Moulton.
While the sheriff was at Courland yesterday a report reached him that a number of ballot boxes at Moulton had been stolen and he organized a posse and proceeded to that place. On his arrival he and his entire posse were overpowered by a party of mountaineers and placed in jail
When the people of Courtland heard of this a rousing crowd was at once organized and armed and sent post haste to Moulton. It was expected that bloodshed would result when they reached Moulton and attempted to release the sheriff and his posse. The latest report is that the sheriff and his crowd made bond and was released before the Courtland delegation arrived. Excitement is running high in Lawrence and the opinion seems to be that unless the court house squabble is settled serious trouble will result. Source: Vernon Courier, Lamar County AL, August 10, 1893
It seems that many families in the Shoals area at one time or another either lived or passed through Lawrence County. Many veterans of the War Between the States relocated to the northwest section of Alabama after the hostilities were over. I can just see my large family of Terrys, Peebles and all related families discussing this topic. Funny is it not, how passion for standing up for something seems to have vanished. Those families stood up for what they believed in. If this is in question whatsoever in your mind, then just think upon this. Records and documents, even modern-day technology thinks that the Hillsboro Post Office is at the intersection of Latitude 343813N and  Longitude 0871133W. And it is on the Hillsboro map. However, it was not always located at that exact spot. Just ask those Terry, Peebles and allied neighbors who moved the Post Office in the middle of the night one night long ago so that it would be more conducive to ‘ladies’ patronizing the post office.
 

Photos from the past…

are treasures and here is another one of Charles “Charlie” Dawson Letson who was born in Lawrence County, Alabama and then lived and died in Texas. This photo is dated 1910 because the youngest child was born in 1910 and is held in her mother’s arms in the photo. Florence Pauline Letson was born in 1910 and appears to be months old in the photograph. Please note that the girls have dolls, which was unusual in those days and times, but they have no shoes. Not wearing shoes in the summer time was common in those days.

Photo of Charley and Dennis Katey Talley Letson 1910 in Texas


Photos from the past…

from far distant places are just as precious. Charles Dawson Letson was the son of Robert George Green “Bob” Letson and his first wife Mary Elizabeth Grady Letson of Lawrence County. Many of their descendants still live in the Shoals area. But some went to points in the west.

Their son Charlie went to different points in Texas. He was in Texas prior to 1903 and his first marriage. Charlie was born 3 February 1879 in Lawrence County, Alabama and died in 1950 in Pecan Gap, Delta County, Texas. Charlie had children by two wives, both , marriages took place in Texas. This is a photo of him as a cowboy circa 1900. He was a handsome man and cowboy.

Photo of Charles Dawson Letson


Photos from the past…

from Roundtop School in the early 1900s. The two students named in the photo are Riley Bond Garrett and his brother Charles Jackson Garrett. Riley Garrett was born 21 August 1896 in Winston County, Alabama. Brother Charlie Garrett was born 1894 and died 1968. There may well be other siblings in the photo as well, just not named. Riley Garrett lived near Leighton in Colbert County for many years and at time of his death in 1989. They were two of a dozen children of Fountain Ambrose Garrett.

Photo of Riley Bond Garrett and Charles Jackson Garrett