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Posts tagged “Remembering the Shoals

So, Menefee women were important,too…

Mildred Emily Menefee was born in 24 May in Jonesboro, Missouri. She was the daughter of  Dr Buell Fountain Menefee and Flora Catherine Baker Menefee.

Mildred Emily Menefee descends from Revolutionary War Soldier, Jarrett Menefee. She became a Daughter of the American Revolution on Jarrett Menefee’s line back in

Jarrett Menefee was born 1721 in Spotsylvania County, Colony of Virginia. Jarrett Menefee died 7 March 1811 in Lincoln, Kentucky County of Virginia. He was the father of William Menefee, Jonas Menefee,

Jarrett Menefee gave service in Virginia with the rank of Private. He served under Captain Benjamin Logan.[3] He, sons,  and other family members served to gain America’s Independence. They were awarded land warrants for their service, first in Kentucky County, Virginia.

In her own right, Mildred Emily Menefee Warlow, made her own contributions to the greater good of society during her long lifetime. She was 93 years of age at her death. She married John Franklin Wardlow and had but one child, John Wardlow.

1940 Federal Census record

Name: Mildred Menefee
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1940
Event Place: Montgomery City, Montgomery Township, Montgomery, Missouri, United States
Sex: Female
Age: 25
Marital Status: Single
Race (Original): White
Race: White
Relationship to Head of Household (Original): Daughter
Relationship to Head of Household: Daughter
Birthplace: Missouri
Birth Year (Estimated): 1915
Last Place of Residence: Same House
District: 70-16
Family Number: 178
Sheet Number and Letter: 8B
Line Number: 52
Affiliate Publication Number: T627
Affiliate Film Number: 2131
Digital Folder Number: 005460066
Image Number: 00214
Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
Buell Menefee Head M 52 Missouri
Flora Menefee Wife F 52 Missouri
Mildred Menefee Daughter F 25 Missouri[2]

Daughter of Buell Fountain Menefee and Flora Baker

Wife of John Franklin Wardlow

Obituary WARDLOW-Mildred Menefee Wardlow, age 92 , died at her home in Villa Gardens Apartments on June 22, 2006. A Pasadena resident since 1952, Mildred was born in Jonesburg, Mo., May 24, 1914 to Dr. Buell Menefee and Flora Baker Menefee.

She attended the University of Missouri, where she served as Mortar Board president and was a member of the Alpha Phi sorority. She graduated with a BS and a BA in 1938. During undergraduate school, she worked as an actuary with the State of Missouri Insurance Department. Mildred was among the first female executives of IBM. She graduated from the IBM School, and worked there from 1939-1946.

After marrying and having a son, she returned to college, obtained a Masters from CSULA, and attended USC to complete her teaching credentials. She served as a counselor at John Muir High School (1954-1957) before going on to work at Pasadena City College. Mildred Wardlow started working at PCC in 1957. She was Dean of Administration, later appointed Vice President of Administration, and retired from that position in June of 1980. A fountain dedicated to Mildred Wardlow is located at the Community Skills Center of PCC.

Mildred married Col. John Franklin Wardlow, U.S. Army, on June 11, 1942. Their son, John Wardlow, was born Jan. 29,1947. A devoted wife and mother, Mildred was widowed Dec.30, 1972. She never remarried.

Mrs. Wardlow loved Pasadena, PCC, and was active in the community after her retirement. She belonged to the Women’s City Club, the Women’s Civic League, the Fine Arts Club and the Pasadena Arts Council.

In addition to having been widowed, Mildred was preceded in death by her beloved son John Wardlow (Jan. 29,1947-Dec. 27,1997) an attorney who graduated from USC, and who practiced law in Tallahassee, FL.

She is survived by her adoring daughter-in-law, Susan Wardlow Anderson, Susan’s husband, Tom Anderson, and a host of very dear friends. A very good woman, Mildred will be missed by all who knew her. Cabot and Sons Funeral Home are handling her final arrangements. Her ashes are to be scattered at sea. A celebration of her life will be held at Villa Gardens, 842 E. Villa St., at Villa Vista. 2:30 pm, Wednesday, June 28.


Sources

  1. MEMORIAL ID 157153337
  2. Citing this Record: “United States Census, 1940,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K77D-6BL : accessed 7 January 2018), Mildred Menefee in household of Buell Menefee, Montgomery City, Montgomery Township, Montgomery, Missouri, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 70-16, sheet 8B, line 52, family 178, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 – 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 2131
  3. Collins History of Kentucky , Volume 1, P 12
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Sometime inlaws are outlaws…

or something to that effect.

Samuel Boulds Barron who was born  16 Oct 1808 in Greene County, Georgia and died 8 June 1886 in Nacogdoches, Nocogdoches, Texas married Phoebe C Barber born 1818 and died 1900. They had a number of children. Their known chidlren are:Sarah Elizabeth Barron 1838–1924, Mahala Ann Barron 1843–1910, Samuel B Barron 1844–1932, Tillitha Barron born 1845, J T Barron 1845–1880, Phineas Barron 1854–1939, Marcus LaFayette Fate Barron 1857–194, Louisa J Barron 1859–1891.

While Samuel B Barron have descendants that were residents and natives of the Shoals area, it is Samuel Boulds Barron’s daughter Mahala Ann Barron who married William Wilson Walker that is of interest at present.With all the bravery in the Revolutionary War, the Indian Wars, the War of Northern Aggression, and the Vietnam Conflict that Barron men fought in and Barron wives and families suffered through, it is the infamous that seem to catch interest.

Mahala Ann Barron was born about 1843 in Nacogdoches, Texas. Her parents were Samuel Boulds Barron and Phoebe C Barber. She married William Wilson “W.W.” Walker on March 18, 1886. They divorced on March 24, 1910.

They had several children:

Charles Samuel Walker (1866 – 1956)
Mary Elizabeth Walker Toms (1869 – 1930)
Susan “Susie” Virginia Walker Muckleroy (1876 – 1966)
Belle Zora Walker Briggs (1879 – 1962)
Walter Willis Walker (1880 – 1960)
Cumie Talitha Walker Barrow (1874 – 1942)
William Alexander Walker

Mahala Ann Barron Walker had a daughter named Cumie Talitha Walker. She was born 21 Nov 1874 in Nacogdoches, Texas. Cumie Talitha had siblings by the names of Charles Walker and Mary Elizabeth Waker Toms. Cumie Talitha Walker married Henry Basil Barrow. Cumie Talitha Walker Barrow died 14 Aug 1942 om Dallas, Texas.

Henry Basil Barrow and Cumie Talitha Walker were the parents of Elvin Wilson Barrow, Artie Adelle Barrow Keys, Marvin Ivan Barrow Sr, Nellie May Barrow Francis, Leon C Barrow, and Lillian Marie Barrow Scoma. And, they were the parents of Clyde Chestnut Barrow.

Clyde Chestnut Barrow was born on 24 March 1909, in Telico, Texas. He was the fifth of seven children born into a family lacking in worldly  riches but a close-knit farming family. His family’s farm failed due to drought and they eventually moved to Dallas, Texas. Clyde Chestnut Barrow, who was a small and unassuming boy, attended school until the age of 16 and had ambitions of becoming a musician, learning to play both the guitar and saxophone.

However, under the influence of his older brother, Buck, Clyde soon turned to a life of crime. Beginning with petty thievery, then graduating to stealing cars, Clyde soon escalated his activities to armed robbery. By late 1929, at the age of 20, Clyde was already a fugitive from the law, wanted by authorities for several robberies.

And then he joined with Bonnie.

Bonnie and Clyde

In January 1930, Clyde met a 19-year-old waitress named Bonnie Parker through a mutual friend and was immediately smitten. But after spending much time together during the following weeks, their budding romance was interrupted when Clyde was arrested and convicted on various counts of auto theft.

Once in prison, Clyde’s thoughts turned to escape. By this time, he and Bonnie had fallen deeply in love, and Clyde was overtaken by heartache. Sharing his sentiments, much to the dismay of her mother, a lovesick Bonnie was more than willing to help the man she called her soulmate, and soon after his conviction she smuggled a gun into the prison for him. On March 11, 1930, Clyde used the weapon to escape with his cellmates, but they were captured a week later. Clyde was then sentenced to 14 years of hard labor, eventually being transferred to Eastham State Farm, where he was repeatedly sexually assaulted by another inmate.

While Clyde was serving his sentence, he and Bonnie began a passionate correspondence with each other, and once again, Clyde’s thoughts turned to escape. Hoping to be relieved of his grueling work detail and paroled, Clyde had his big toe and part of another toe cut off in an “accident.’ (As a result, he would walk with a permanent limp and be forced to drive in his socks.) Unbeknownst to Clyde, his desperate scheme was unnecessary—his mother had already convinced the judge in his case to grant him parole. He was released two weeks later, in February 1932. Source: Clyde Barrow Biography.com

It did not end well for Bonnie and Clyde, even when the shootout happened and they were killed, they were so famous that souvenir seekers ravaged the scene, cutting one of Clyde’s ears for a take home souvenir. They wanted to be buried together or side by side, but their wish was not granted as they were buried separately.


James Richardson Isbell’s Find-A-Grave Memorial..

Find A Grave Memorial# 105684640

James R. Isbell
Birth:  Oct. 5, 1791
Sevier County
Tennessee, USA

Death:  Jun. 4, 1844
Lim Rock
Jackson County
Alabama, USA

James R Isbell  was born October 5, 1791 in Tennessee, and died June 4, 1844, at Lim Rock, Jackson Co., AL.

His name is given as James R. Isbell in some records.
Because he had a nephew (son of brother Levi) named James Richardson Isbell, some believe his name was James Richardson.

1813
James Isbell married Elizabeth Birdwell on Saturday, May 1,1813 by Rev. John Canterbury at Enon Baptist Church in Huntsville, Madison Co., Mississippi Territory — later Alabama Territory and State of Alabama (Madison County, Alabama Marriage Book 1, page 104: license issued Saturday, April 24, 1813). Enon is now the First Baptist Church of Huntsville. A family tree said they married on Saturday, May 1, 1813, which was May Day. Enon Church records (p.11) show Church Service was conducted Saturday, May 1.
Elizabeth Birdwell was the daughter of John Birdwell, one of the founders of Enon Church (Isbell Country by Odessa Morrow Isbell, pp. 19-20, 229; The Mitchells of Linn Flatt by Gwenneth Mitchell, p.215).

1816
His brother Levi Isbell married Sarah H. Birdwell.
John Birdwell offered slaves to his daughters and sons-in-law, James and Levi Isbell. Sarah Birdwell and husband Rev. Levi Isbell refused but Elizabeth Birdwell and James Isbell accepted theirs (Isbell Country, p. 20; The Mitchells of Linn Flatt by Gwenneth Mitchell; The Heritage of Marshall County, Alabama, p.199).

1818
24 Feb. 1818, Limestone County, Alabama: Moses Birdwell was assigned 158.60 acres by James Isbell (#1156) at cost of $317.20. Moses Birdwell paid $77.30 in stock and cash on 23 Feb. 1818. On 16 Oct. 1818 James Isbell completed the transfer of land to Moses Birdwell. (Recorded in Old Land Records, Limestone Co.; cited in Birdwell Family Tree by Velma Schonder.)

4 Sept. 1821, Moses Birdwell received certificate #664 in Limestone Co. outlining the installment payments he needed to receive the patent on the land he had purchased from James Isbell. Moses Birdwell bought the land with aid from Congress in a law that gave relief to purchasers of public lands prior to 1 July 1820. In 1821 Moses Birdwell owed $237.90.
27 Sept. 1822: Moses Birdwell paid the balance owing on this date and received the final certificate for this land, certificate #1156.
25 Oct.1826: Moses Birdwell sold for $1000 to Stephen Flinn, both of Limestone Co., the land (or a portion thereof?) he had been assigned by James Isbell (Limestone Deed Book 2, pp.278-9; Alabama Records by Pauline Jones Gandrud, vol.24, p.45). The land was the SW 1/4 of sec. 3, twp.4, range 4W.

1819
Before Statehood (1819) James Isbell and brothers John and Levi had bought several tracts of land in Madison County and present-day Jackson County. (Alabama Territorial Land Records.)

1820
James Isbell is in Lincoln County, Tennessee census:
1 m 26-44 (James Isbell, head of house)
1 f 16-25 (Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell, wife)
1 f -10 (Mary Ann b. 1816)
1 m -10 (William b. 1818)
NO SLAVES

1823
Before 1823 James Isbell staked claim to land in Township 4S Range 4E (NENE of Section 9), a mile NE of Isbell Cemetery and his brother John William Isbell’s property. James’s land here is shown on an 1823 survey as J.R. Isbell (I.D.#6998) and brother John’s is shown as J.W. Isbell (which adjoins a larger parcel in which his name is written “John Isbell.”

The survey map identifying James’ parcel is hard to read, but looks like J. r. Isbell.
But this same land patent was recorded in the name James R. Isbell in 1858, 14 after his death and acquired by his heirs. The estate of James R. Isbell was entered in the Probate Court of Jackson County in 1858 and the estate settlement lists all his heirs.

Interestingly, on this same survey dated 1823, a mile east of this property is a tract shown in the name of E. Conaway adjoining Wm. Gentle, Levi Isbell (m. Sarah Birdwell), Zachariah Isbell, B.B. Allen (who married Sarah’s daughter Mary Ann Isbell), and Culvers (inlaws). This same tract patent (#6944) was not recorded until 1860 when it was recorded in the name Elizabeth Conaway, who was the widow of James Isbell: Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conaway. As she did not remarry until 1846-47 to John Conaway (who died in 1853), the name of E. Conway on the 1823 survey appears to have been added in 1858-60.
The 1823 survey and 1860 patent map shows that the property of Sarah (Mrs. Levi) Isbell adjoined that of her sister, Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway.
(Also see Family Maps of Jackson County, AL by Gregory A. Boyd, p.361.)

1828
In 1828, James Isbell was a delegate from Blue Springs Church to the Mud Creek Baptist Association (ref., The First Hundred Years, A History of Baptists in Jackson Co., Alabama from 1821 until 1921 by J. Nelson Varnell [Samford University Library, Special Collections], vol. 2, p. 19).

1830 census Jackson Co, AL
1 male 30-39 (James Isbell, head)
1 male 10-14 (1816-20) Wm b. 3 Dec 1818
1 male 5-9 (1821-25) John S. b.25 Nov 1820
1 male 5-9 (1821-24) Allen b. 23 Mar 1825
1 female 30-39 (1791-99) (Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell b.1797-9)
1 female 10-14 (1816-1820) Mary Polly b1816 (married 1834)
1 female under 5 (1825-30) Susan b1827 (Sarah Amanda b1822 d1830 per a family tree)
1 female under 5 (1825-30) Margaret b1829
SLAVES
1 female 24-35
1 female under 10
From the Bible record, there should be 7 children shown in 1830, 4 girls and 3 boys, but one daughter seems to be missing, probably Sarah Amanda (a family tree says she died 1830). Mary Polly born 1816 did not marry until 1834, so both she and Margaret (born 1829) should be included.

1840 Jackson County, Alabama, census:
1 male 40-49 (James Isbell, head, age 49)
1 male 20-29 (1811-20) John S b1820
1 male 15-19 (1821-1825) Allen 1825
1 male 5-9 (1835-9) Benjamin 1831
1 male 5-9 (1835-9) James H 1833
1 male 5-9 (1835-39) Zachariah b1835
1 female 40-49 (Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell, wife)
1 female 10-14 (1826-30) Sarah b1822 (age 18–gone?) or Susan b1827
1 female 10-14 (1826-30) Susan b1827 (or Margaret b1829)
1 female under 5 Margaret b1829 (or Eliz b1838)
1 female under 5 Eliz b1838 (or Lucinda b1840)
SLAVE
1 female 10-23

William & Mary Polly were gone by 1840. Sarah Amanda born 1822 would be 18, was gone or dead. A family tree says Sarah Manda died 1830. She definitely was not named in the 1857 or 1890 probate records.

1844 DEATH AND BURIAL
According to James Isbell’s descendants, the Houk and Murray families, James R. Isbell was buried at Blue Spring Cemetery at Larkinsville. Other descendants said he was buried at “Larkinsville Cemetery,” which has caused some confusion as that is the cemetery that is also called Beech Grove. All these cemeteries are nearby and not far from the Isbell family cemetery.

1846
Jackson County, Alabama,
Will and Probate Record K, p. 108:
John Isbell, guardian of the minor heirs of James Isbell deceased, 1846, showing a payment by him to Elizabeth Isbell for “rent for 1845.” Note that this is obviously the widow of James Isbell.
Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell, widow, married John Conway 1846-47. In the 1850 census they were listed in Jackson County. He died Sept 7, 1853.

Descendants qualify for membership in First Families of Alabama (through the Alabama Genealogical Society) and the First Families of Tennessee (through the East Tennessee Historical Society) #10,880, #10,881. Also the First Families of Kentucky (through John Miller), Colonial Dames of the XVII Century (through Capt. Zachariah Isbell), Sons of the Republic of Texas and Daughters of the Republic of Texas (through John Birdwell).

Jackson County, Alabama, Probate Court:
April 1857, pages 181-182
June 1857, pages 241-242.
These name heirs of James Isbell, including Susan Murray, wife of Jackson Murray.
These do not show the widow Elizabeth,
who Elizabeth had remarried by 1850, but was living with her daughter Lucinda Murray in Jackson County at the 1870 census.

Heirs of James Isbell are listed in his brother Zachariah’s estate administration in 1890 (Dekalb County, Alabama, Probate Minute Book K, pp. 582-586).

The children of James Isbell and Elizabeth Birdwell were:
1. Mary Ann “Polly” Isbell born 1 APR 1816 (probably named for maternal grandmother, Mary Allen Birdwell)
2. William Birdwell Isbell born 3 DEC 1818, d. 14 Feb 1856 White Co., Arkansas)
3. John S. Isbell born 25 NOV 1820
4. Sarah Amanda Isbell born 25 DEC 1822, died 27 Apr 1830 according to a family tree (taken from another Birdwell bible and a newspaper item; not on 1830-40 censuses nor 1857 and 1890 probate records)
5. Allen Isbell born 23 MAR 1825 (named for uncle Allen Birdwell)
6. Susan Isbell born 18 JAN 1827
7. Margaret Isbell born 24 MAR 1829
8. Benjamin Isbell born 6 MAY 1831
9. James H. Isbell born 25 AUG 1833
10. Zachariah Isbell born 25 JUN 1835
11. Elizabeth Isbell born 18 JAN 1838
12. Lucinda Isbell born 8 JUL 1840 (tombstone says 1841) m. John K. Murray
13. Levi Isbell born 17 JUL 1843 (tombstone says 17 July 1847)

Some internet genealogies confuse this James R. Isbell with his cousin Dr. James R. Isbell (c1761-1840) from Greene County, Tennessee, father of William M. Isbell (15 Jun 1816-2 Dec 1877) and James H. Isbell who were at the Battle of San Jacinto, Texas. Some family trees show Zachariah Isbell Jr. as the probable father of Dr. James R. Isbell, although Zachariah Jr.’s brother William most likely was his father, or another brother, Jason.

JAMES R. ISBELL’S WIFE:
ELIZABETH BIRDWELL,
Daughter of John Birdwell & Mary Allen.
Granddaughter of George Birdwell, as shown by First Families of Tennessee (East Tennessee Historical Society), #10.880 and #10.881.

One of Elizabeth Isbell’s sons and three grandsons were named Birdwell.

Elizabeth Birdwell was born in Tennessee Dec. 31, 1797 or Jan. 1, 1800 (1850-70 censuses prove Tennessee was birth place).
Tombstone and 1850 census give 1800 date while the James Isbell Bible and 1860-70 censuses give the 1797 date.
In 1813, Elizabeth Birdwell married James Isbell in Madison County, Alabama, three years before her younger sister Sarah Birdwell (born 1799) married James Isbell, indicating that the 1797 date in the Bible is the most likely correct date.

John Birdwell and family moved to Madison County in 1805 FROM TENNESSEE (see historic marker, Old Bethel Church, Marshall Co., AL).
The 1809 census shows he had 6 daughters.
Elizabeth fits as one of these. The other five known daughters born before 1809 were Mary/Polly, Nancy, Sarah, Susan, and Jane.

In 1812, John Birdwell’s brother Moses Birdwell moved FROM GEORGIA to Madison County and was the only other Birdwell family in the county in 1813. Moses lived in Georgia 1791-1812; all his children were born in Georgia and Alabama.
Moses and 2nd wife Hannah Falkindon had a daughter Elizabeth born 1822 in Limestone Co., AL.
In 1818, Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell’s husband James Isbell sold land in Limestone Co., AL. to her uncle Moses Birdwell.

John Birdwell and his brother Moses were the only two Birdwell families in Madison County, Alabama, in 1813, when Elizabeth Birdwell married James Isbell there, and both Birdwell brothers were sons of George Birdwell.

Jan. 4, 1956 letter from Maud McLure Kelly to Ethlyn Rainey quoting Rainey’s previous letter (Dec 1955) in turn quoting MM Kelly’s earlier letter (probably Nov-Dec 1955) stating “Elizabeth Birdwell who married James Isbell (was) the daughter of John Birdwell and sister of Sarah H. Birdwell Isbell.”
Maud McLure Kelly, Acquisitions Agent and Asst. Dir. of the Alabama Department of Archives and History, was the first woman lawyer in Alabama and first woman lawyer qualified to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. (Isbell and Birdwell vertical files, microfilm, Alabama State Archives.)

Letter from Ethlyn Isbell Rainey dated Sept. 12, 1978, p. 7, again stated that Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell was the daughter of John Birdwell and sister of her great-grandmother Sarah Birdwell Isbell.
Ethlyn Rainey was a member of the Heroes of Kings Mountain Chapter DAR, along with two sisters, one of whom (Mrs. Dorsett Davis) was also Regent.
In 1954 Ethlyn Rainey was the GOP nominee for State Treasurer of Alabama.
Ethlyn’s grandfather Elijah Miller Isbell was a double first cousin of the children of Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell and, as the administrator of the estate of his uncle Zachariah Isbell, he documented all known children of James and Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell on his list of heirs. Ethlyn Rainey grew up in the home with Elijah Miller Isbell’s widow, her grandmother, and was well educated in the Isbell-Birdwell family histories so she was well qualified to state the family relationships correctly. She wrote of two family legends:
(1) that the two Isbell brothers worked for John Birdwell and married his two daughters; and
(2) that John Birdwell gave slaves to his children before moving to Texas, that Levi and Sarah Birdwell Isbell refused theirs but that James and Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell accepted theirs (also reiterated by Ethlyn’s sister Cora Walker, D.A.R. member, in Heritage of Marshall Co., AL. (2000), p.199; also, Families and History of Sullivan County, Tennessee [Vol. 1 1779-1992; Vol. 2. 1779-2006] (Holston Territory Genealogical Society, 1992), p. 349; and Isbell Country by Odessa Morrow Isbell, pp. 19, 20, 229; The Mitchells of Linn Flat by Gwenneth Mitchell).

The 1830 census shows James and Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell owned 2 female slaves, and the 1840 census shows 1 female slave (probably the younger of the two in 1830). These were probably housekeepers for Elizabeth.

Another great-granddaughter of Levi Isbell and Sarah Birdwell who wrote of Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell and Sarah Birdwell Isbell being sisters was Cora Helen Isbell Walker, Ph.D. (Library Sciences), member of the Heroes of Kings Mountain Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, Guntersville, Alabama, NSDAR #754316. Cora H. Walker wrote the following, published in Heritage of Marshall Co., AL. (2000), p.199:
“John Birdwell … organized Birdwell Spring(s) Baptist Church near Moulton, AL… two Isbell brothers, James and Levi, who came from Tennessee to Madison County, they worked for Mr. B. Both brothers married Birdwell sisters. James married Elizabeth and Levi married Sarah (Sallie). When Mr. B. and family left Madison Co. for Rusk Co. Texas, he offered Elizabeth and James and Levi and Sallie slaves — James and Elizabeth accepted, but Levi refused as he did not believe in slavery, he and Sallie were given money instead.” Written by Cora H. Isbell Walker, Ph.D.

Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway Chronlogy Continued:
1846: John W. Isbell, Admn. of estate of James Isbell, paid rent for (widow) Mrs. Elizabeth Isbell for the year 1845.
1847-9 Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell married John Conaway.

1850 Jackson Co., AL Census:
John Conaway 60 VA
Elizabeth Conaway 50 TN (nee Birdwell)
Zachariah Conaway (Isbell) 16
Elizabeth Conaway (Isbell) 12
Lucinda Conaway (Isbell) 10
Levi Conaway (Isbell) 7

She was widowed in 1853.
By 1860 she was living with Elijah Murray family, uncle of her two sons-in-law Murray.

1860 census: Jackson Co., AL
E.A. Murray 23 (Elijah A.)
N.J. Murray 19 (Nancy J.)
M.A. Murray 1
Elizabeth Conaway 63 TN (nee Birdwell)
Levi Conaway (Isbell) 17

1860: The land staked in 1823 by James Isbell was patented in the name E. Conaway.
1858: The land patent (I.D.#6998)staled by James R. Isbell in 1823 was recorded in the name James R. Isbell, 14 after his death, and acquired by his estate. The estate of James R. Isbell was entered in the Probate Court of Jackson County and the estate settlement lists all his heirs.
The second tract (patent #6944), 1 mile east, and also adjoining Sarah Birdwell (Mrs. Levi) Isbell, was recorded 1860 in the name Elizabeth Conaway, who was the widow of James Isbell.

By 1870 Elizabeth was living with her daughter Lucinda Isbell Murray, widow of Elijah Murray’s nephew.
1870 Jackson Co, AL
Lusinda Murry 30 (nee Isbell)
Mary E Murry 10
Marian M. Murry 7 male
Elizabett Coneway 74 TN (nee Birdwell)

In 1872 she was believed to be living with her youngest son James Hugh Isbell in Colbert County where she died.

Lucinda Isbell Murray’s death certificate lists parents Jim & Elizabeth Isbell.
Her brother Levy (sic) Isbel’s death certificate lists father James Isbel.

James Hugh Isbell married Clarissa Elizabeth Crittenden, the daughter of his first cousin Martha Birdwell Crittenden of Crittenden’s Crossroads. Martha’s father John A Birdwell was a brother of Elizabeth Isbell Birdwell.

Family links:
Parents:
William Zachariah Isbell (1769 – 1826)
Sarah Richardson Isbell (1775 – 1845)

Spouse:
Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway (1800 – 1872)

Children:
Mary Ann Isbell Talkington (1816 – 1889)*
William Birdwell Isbell (1818 – 1857)*
Susan Anna Isbell Murray (1826 – 1892)*
Benjamin Isbell (1832 – 1906)*
James Hugh Isbell (1833 – 1902)*
Zachariah Isbell (1835 – 1863)*
Elizabeth Catherine Isbell Peters (1838 – 1865)*
Lucinda Isbell Murray (1841 – 1910)*
David Levi Isbell (1842 – 1918)*
David Levi Isbell (1842 – 1918)*

Siblings:
John William Isbell (1789 – 1873)
James R. Isbell (1791 – 1844)
Levi Isbell (1797 – 1876)
Miller Isbell (1800 – 1859)
Elizabeth Isbell Summers (1804 – 1872)
Hannah Isbell Mershon (1805 – 1892)
Jemima Isbell Summers (1807 – 1842)
Nancy Margaret Isbell Baker (1814 – 1846)
Zachariah Isbell (1814 – 1890)*
Rebecca Isbell Bruton (1816 – ____)

Burial:
Blue Spring Cemetery
Larkinsville
Jackson County
Alabama, USA
Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?]
Created by: Ray Isbell
Record added: Feb 23, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 105684640


Another Menefee man to be proud of…

Richard Hickman Menefee (December 4, 1809 – February 20, 1841) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky. Due to his oratory skill, he was dubbed “the young Patrick Henry of the West.” He was presumed the successor to Henry Clay as leader of the Whig Party until his death at age thirty-one.

Menefee received a meager education in his early life. A dispute with his stepfather caused him to leave home in his mid-teens. He worked as a teacher to support himself and pay to finish his education. He graduated from Transylvania University and studied law. In 1831, he was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney for Kentucky’s eleventh district and was elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives the following year.

In 1836, Menefee was elected to the House of Representatives. His best known speech in that body urged restraint in the Caroline affair with the British. His reputation, and that of fellow Kentuckian John J. Crittenden, were tarnished due to their involvement in a duel between Representatives William J. Graves and Jonathan Cilley in which the latter was mortally wounded. He did not stand for re-election following his term in office and returned to his legal practice. In 1841, he was elected to the U.S. Senate, but died five days later before he could take office. Menifee County, Kentucky, despite the spelling discrepancy, is named in his honor[1]


Eulogy given by Thomas F Marshall at the death of Hon Richard Hickman Menefee:

Hon. Richard H Menefee, the statesman and lawyer, in honor of when Menifee County was named, was born near Owingsville, Bath County, Kentucky, in the year 1810(1809). In early life he taught a school, to supply the means for obtaining a profession.His success at the bar was rapid and brilliant. He was barely eligible when he was elected to represent the county of Montgomery in the Kentucky legislature. In that body he served terms, 1835, ’37 and early established a character for ability which spread his name through the state. At twenty-seven years of age, as the Whig candidate he was elected to congress by 234 majority over Judge Richard French, one of the most popular and astute Democratic politicians of the day, and in a district where the latter had been elected two years before, by an overwhelming majority. He served but one term, 1837-39. His efforts on the floor of the house, bearing the impress of high genius and commanding talent, soon placed him in the front rank of debaters, at a time when congress was remarkable for the number of its able men. At the close of his term of service he removed to Lexington, as a larger field for the practice of his profession. Business flowed in upon him, and he was rapidly amassing a fortune which would have enabled him to re-enter public life, and accomplish those ardent desires cherished form his early boyhood. His career was prematurely checked by his death, Feb. 20, 1841, when only 31 years of age. Over the whole state his death cast a gloom. It has been the fortune of but few men, of the same age, to achieve a reputation so splendid. Born in obscurity, and forced to struggle in early life against an array of depressing influences sufficient to crush any common spirit, he had rapidly but surely attained an eminence which fixed upon him the eyes of all America, as one of our most promising statesmen,while at home his view of public policy were known to be at once liberal, comprehensive; and profound, he was great as a lawyer and greater as a statesmen.
The eulogy of Thomas F. Marshall upon Mr Menefee’s life and services —

the tribute of genius to genius, of brilliant but erratic genius to genius still more brilliant but self-poised and commanding — is one of the most graceful and eloquent in the whole field of panegyric literature.[1]

Richard Hickman Menefee’s son Richard Jouett Menefee contributed to the content of the book that honors his father.


Hon Richard H Menefee’s death date is given as 20 and 21 Feb 1841. Since his eulogy gives his death date as 20 Feb 1841, that is the date used here.


Let me tell you bout the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees, and a thing called love…

I am your parents’ generation, and the world was ever ever so much better for my generation growing up. We did not suffer through the Great Depression like our parents and grandparents.I often say that we lived in a Norman Rockwell world. I miss my America. I want my America for my littles who are right now elementary age.
I grew up in southwest Sheffield, not exactly a privileged part of town, but we felt rich. Our community was safe even for girls to wander around on bikes. Our school system actually taught instead of indoctrinated. And in our neighborhood there were railroad workers, construction workers, business owners, and retired grandparents. We looked at families who did not have as much as us, but we were never really well off, with compassion. I recall the teachers dressing one set of kids every day who came to school dirty and ragged.
The uber left did a number on America during the Vietnam conflict; and the brave soldiers returning never to this day got the welcome back they deserved. There have been crooks in office, to note Richard Nixon aka Tricky Dicky. There was LBJ who was disastrous for America…whose wife was a slumloard; and useless Presidents like Carter who put the country into such a malaise that it still hurts your heart yet today. But there have been heroes, too. Our fathers WERE the Greatest Generation and shed blood and died to allow their children and future generations to have continued freedom. That seems to have dissipated today.
We knew the enemy of America, the biggest was Khrushchev who pounded his shoe on the table and said that he would destroy America. For a little girl that was frightening But it was equally as heartening when you saw that the adult generation was going to have none of that. In your lifetime there has been perhaps Bill Clinton who was not a great President and could not keep his pants zipped, but was forced into somewhat greatness by the like of Newt Gingrich who was Speaker of the House and Art Laffer…afterwards he declared that the era of big government was over, a balanced federal budget came to fruition, and America was prosperous and safe. Please take the time to study Art Laffer and the Laffer Curve, bet you Donald Trump knows it well. Then there was Obama under whom America has declined so much, to the point that it is at the brink of not existing. And now Hillary Clinton wants to double down on Obama’s mantras and implement many times as much misery. It is now that Trump has miraculously come upon the scene. He may have some warts, but nothing compared to his opponent. He is a doer, he is a results oriented man, and he is a patriot. The stark contrast between him and his opponent is so deep and wide; there is really only one choice for those who love America. For those who are religious, then it is a good thing if you pray for his safety (after so many political opposition people have suddenly felled dead in the past of your lifetime) and pray that he is righteous and stays that way, and pray that he makes America back to some semblance of what she was, even greater. There is a great service that Christians can do right now to protect their children, grandchildren and future generations and that is to put social issues aside this election and think about all the great things that can and will be accomplished for those who cannot yet vote…for elections are not about us (and unfortunately that is what most Obama voters believed…free phones, free stuff, going to pay my mortgage and put gas in my car)…or the me of you. Elections are always about making the nation better for the next generation. So stand up and make America better for the future generations. That is the America I see and the one I live in now is not nearly as great as the one I grew up in. I worked hard in the 2008 and 2012 elections to keep America from the brink, but the candidates were failed candidates. This election there is only one candidate that is failed….and she must defeated for the sake of our future generations. This is my studied opinion, made from research over almost a decade, lifetime. I love my America. I love my children and grandchildren. I will love my future generations if I get to meet them, but not likely will I get to meet them. We each have a civic duty to protect them and that means being politically informed and active.
Okay, so this treatise was not so much about the birds, bees, flowers or trees, as it was about a thing called LOVE. It was about LOVE for my nation. It was about LOVE for my family. It was about LOVE for my children, which is one less now; LOVE for my grandson and his wife, love for my two littles who are the twinkle in my eyes – my great-grandchildren. And how I am responsible to do everything possible to make my America as great for them as it was for me. And it was every bit as much about honoring our parents, the Greatest Generation, who fought to maintain the freedom that this country has almost thrown away; and the many sacrifices that past generations have made to provide the nation’s children a better future than their present.
What would be so nice would be for those of my generation to comment about how their world looked as they grew up and contrast it with today. I think that would be very instructive.

A beautiful description of mother…

by Dr James Martin Peebles (1822-1922). Nancy Brown Peebles’ eldest son described his parents in detail in 1911 when he was 90 years old. The description will follow verbatim:

My mother lived in a log house, brought up seven children, did her own work, spun the flax for the household linen and helped raise the flocks from whose backs the wool was clipped with her own hands. She fashioned into cloth, and in turn cut and made into clothes for her family. At night we were lighted by the feeble but kindly glow of candles dipped by her own hand. When we were sick, the medicine came from her herbs, drying in the bunches over the fireplace, where also hung the red peppers and the dried apples on strings, and the ears of corn, the old flint-lock rifle of Revolution fame, and the powder horn, and in one side of the fireplace in a niche of its own was the oven where the many loaves were baked to feed the family. There was a room that was musical many hours, now and then, with the whirl of spindles and the shuffle of the handloom, and mother was here spinning and weaving. These were but part of her duties, as I look back, and not an hour of her long life – she lived to be eighty-eight- but her hands were occupied. She worked from dawn to dusk, and on Sunday with a sprig of spearmint and a rose in her hand she went to church and sang in the choir. The neighbors used to call her Aunt Nancy, and when a child was born they sent for Aunt Nancy, and it was Aunt Nancy that laid out the dead. In one corner she had a cabinet of simples, her old-fashioned remedies for the sick. She was strong in her faith, and one of her favorite hymns was, “While Shepherds Watched.” I can, in imagination, still hear her strong inflections as she emphasized important words, like “angel” and “glory.” She sang as though she could catch a glimpse of the other shore. And as she stood in the choir, with her little tuning fork to her ear, under her leadership the choir broke into such words as these:

While shepherds watched their flocks by night
All seated on the ground,
The a-n-g-e-l of the Lord came down
And g-l-o-r-y shone around

My mother was a strong noble character, severe but kindly. She raised five sons and two daughters, and brought them up in the fear of God. Misfortunes taught her many hard lessons! Father and mother, in temperament and to an extent in ambitions, were the direct opposite. Mother from her early youth had been taught to command, and she broke the horse on which she afterwards rode; and when she was a schoolteacher, she made her boys and girls mind the rules, or be punished. Father was a militia-captain, an easy-going, good-natured, honest jovial man, who loved pleasant companionships, and who sometimes drank more than was good for him; and so made bad bargains and at last his land slipped away. Mother and the growing children made another home, and late in life found them again independent, under their own roof-tree.

Source: Hours With Famous Americans, Little Books About Big Men * Life Portraits of Leaders Whose Creative work Has Made for National Progress * In this number – Dr James M Peebles – Being Peculiarly the Ideas and Observations of John Hubert Grusel,Peebles Publishing Company, Highland Park, Los Angeles, CA, 1911, unnumbered


Tishomngo, does that name sound familiar?

Captain Tisho Mingo

Captain Tisho Mingo was a veteran warrior of the Choctaw, departed this life on the 5th inst. Although but little known beyond the limits of his nation, yet he was a man that has seen wars and fought battles—stood high among his own people as a brave and good man. He served under General Wayne in the Revolutionary War, for which he received a pension from the Government of the United States; and in the late war with England, he served under General Jackson, and did many deeds of valor. He had fought in nine battles of the United States. As a friend he has served the white man faithfully. His last words were: “When I am gone, beat the drum and fire the guns.”

 

  I hear the sound of the drum—the report of “death guns” is roaring in our valley—a warrior’s spirit is passing away. The brave Tisho Mingo, the veteran warrior of our tribe, is gone! His clansmen are gathering around the corpse. Long years have passed since first his native hills re-echoed his war-hoop—when grey-headed warriors gathered around his war dance, and said, “Go, young warrior, go—It is beloved Washington who calls for help.” Our aged warrior and chieftains are all gone. Tisho Mingo, the last of the brave, is gone! They are all gone!—Tuscaloosa Flag of the Union, June 30, 1841.Source: Thomas McAdory Owen’s Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama, Alabama Department of Archives.

 

 


Hang down your head Tom Dooley…

Life Story of James Martin Isbell

Colonel James Martin Isbell was a noted local historian and author. James Martin Isbell was the son of Thomas Isbell and Lucinda Petty.James Martin Isbell was a grandson of Thomas Isbell and Discretion Howard Isbell.

James Martin Isbell married Sarah Louise Horton, daughter of David Eagles Horton and Sarah Jane Dula Horton. Sarah Louise Horton was the granddaughter of Nathan and Elizabeth Eagles Horton on her paternal side. She was the granddaughter of William S. Dula and Theodosia Beasley Dula on her maternal side.

Sarah Louise Horton Isbell was a second cousin of Tom Dula (Dooley) who was tracked down and captured by Colonel James Martin Isbell for the murder of Laura Foster. Colonel James Martin Isbell had previously led the search which located the body of Laura Foster. The song about Tom Dooley has been revived a couple of times over the decades, the most famous version being sung by The Kingston Trio; it was entitled Hang Down Your Head Tom Dooley. The ballad was number one for one week in 1958. It has been re-recorded by many singers since.

Colonel James Martin Isbell was a second cousin of Col. Thomas Charles Land (1828-1912), who wrote the Ballad of Tom Dula (also known as “Hang Down Your Head, Tom Dooley”), and his brother Linville Land who made the coffins of both Laura Foster and Tom Dula.

Tom Dula was a grand-nephew of the John Dula who got into a brawl with Thomas Isbell, grandfather of Colonel James Martin Isbell, on28 November28, 1796, during which Dula bit off Tom Isbell’s earlobe.

Ballad of Tom Dula by John Foster West: “Col. James M. Isbell, if we may believe the records, was more responsible for finding Laura Foster’s body…and…the prosecution of Tom Dula than any other individual. Col. Isbell was one of the aristocrats of Happy Valley. He was the great-grandson of Benjamin Howard…”

Colonel James Martin Isbell is cited as an authority in many local histories, pioneer North Carolina and Virginia accounts as well as several family histories. He is cited throughout records and newspaper articles of the Tom Dula murder trial, consistently referred to as Col. James M. Isbell.

“Col. James M. Isbell’s grandfather(sic), Martin, told him that Daniel Boone used to live six miles below James M. Isbell’s present home near the bank of the Yadkin river, on a little creek now known as Beaver Creek, one mile from where it flows into the Yadkin river, near Holman’s ford. The Boone house was in a little swamp and canebrake surrounding the point of a ridge, with but one approach—that by the ridge. The swamp was in the shape of a horse-shoe, with the point of the ridge projecting into it. The foundations of the chimney are still there, and the cabin itself has not been gone more than 52 years. Alfred Foster, who owned the land, showed Col. Isbell the cabin, which was still there during his boyhood, and he remembered how it looked. His grandmother, the wife of Benjamin Howard, knew Boone well as he often stayed with her father, Benjamin Howard, at the mouth of Elk creek, now Elkville.”[2]

“COL. JAMES M. ISBELL. According to the statement made by this gentleman in May 1909, Benjamin Howard, his (great)grandfather, owned land near the village of Boone and used to range his stock in the mountains surrounding that picturesque village. He built a cabin of logs in front of what is now the Boys’ Dormitory of the Appalachian Training School for the accommodation of himself and his herders whenever he or they should come from his home on the headwaters of the Yadkin, at Elkville. Among the herders was an African slave named Burrell. When Col. Isbell was a boy, say, about 1845, Burrell was still alive, but was said to have been over 100 years old. He told Col. Isbell that he had billoted Daniel Boone across the Blue Ridge to the Howard cabin in the first trip Boone ever took across the mountains.”[3]

Footnote 5: In the same book is the statement of James M. Isbell to J.P.A. in May, 1909, at latter’s home.[4]

Footnote 6: It [meaning the cabin of Benjamin Howard] “could still be seen, a few years ago, at the foot of a range of hills some seven and a half miles above Wilkesboro, in Wilkes county.” Thwaites’ “Daniel Boone,” p.78.

1885: The LENOIR TOPIC, 1(?) October 1885, p.4, printed a letter from W.E. White about Daniel Boone’s life in the Yadkin Valley area, which included, “Col. James Isbell, of King’s Creek township(,) could perhaps say something concerning Godfrey Isbell and Pendleton Isbell who were pioneers and also soldiers of Col. Cleveland’s command.” Godfrey Isbell had been bondsman at the marriage of Col. James Isbell’s grandfather Thomas Isbell to Discretion Howard.

Daniel Boone: Master of the Wilderness (1939), by John Bakeless, p. 438, footnote 32.2 gives a footnote citation as follows about the cabin and Burrell’s account of it: “Burrell, the old slave, told the story to Col. James Martin Isbell, of King’s Creek, N. C. Col. Isbell’s grandmother, Mrs. Jordan Councill, daughter of Burrell’s owner, verified the story. She had herself known Daniel Boone.[5]

Mrs. Jordan Councill was the former Sarah Howard, sister of James Martin Isbell’s grandmother. Mrs Sarah Howard Councill was Col.James Martin Isbell’s great-aunt.


Thomas Isbell and Lucinda Petty Isbell household is listed in the 1850 Federal Census record for Caldwell County, North Carolina. The census shows the parents of James Isbell, age 13. According to the census, the parents were Thomas Isbell, b. circa 1800 in N.C. and Luncinda Isbell, b. circa 1811 in N.C.

Name: Thomas Isbell
Age: 50
Estimated birth year: abt 1800
Birth Place: North Carolina
Gender: Male
Home in 1850 (City,County,State): Kings Creek, Caldwell, North Carolina
Household Members: Name Age
Thomas Isbell 50 *
Lucinda Isbell 39 *
James Isbell 13 *
Louisa Isbell 9
Cornelia Isbell 1[6]

Marriage:

Name: James M. Isbell
Event Type: Marriage
Event Date: 01 Mar 1857
Event Place: , Caldwell, North Carolina, United States
Gender: Male
Marital Status: Married
Spouse’s Name: Sarah Louisa Horton
Spouse’s Gender: Female
Reference ID: V. 1-5 p19
GS Film Number: 000590352
Digital Folder Number: 007613706[7]

Military Service during the War Between the States

James M. Isbell was Captain of Company A, 22nd N.C. Regiment. Three sons of John and Frances Knight Land (James, Thomas, & John) served under him until he was wounded and discharged. He was also a witness in Tom Land’s Confederate pension application, filed in east Tennessee.

Name: James M Isbell
Residence: Caldwell County, North Carolina
Age at Enlistment: 23
Enlistment Date: 30 Apr 1861
Rank at enlistment: 2nd Lieut
State Served: North Carolina
Survived the War?: Yes
Service Record: Commissioned an officer in Company A, North Carolina 22nd :Infantry Regiment on 30 Apr 1861.
Mustered out on 15 Jul 1861.
Enlisted in Company A, North Carolina 22nd Infantry
Regiment on 09 Aug 1861.
Promoted to Full Captain on 31 May 1862.
Promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant on 01 May 1862.
Mustered out on 13 Oct 1862.

Civic Duty

1864 – James Martin Isbell was a member of the North Carolina Senate for the 46th Senatorial District


1870 Federal Census:

Name: James M Isbell
Event Type: Census
Event Year: 1870
Event Place: North Carolina, United States
Gender: Male
Age: 32
Race: White
Race (Original): W
Birth Year (Estimated): 1837-1838
Birthplace: North Carolina
Page Number: 2
Household ID: 16
Line Number: 17[8]
Household Role Sex Age Birthplace
James M Isbell M 32 North Carolina
Sarah L Isbell F 31 North Carolina
John Isbell M 10 North Carolina
Mary V Isbell F 8 North Carolina
Thomas Isbell M 6 North Carolina[9]

Death of Mary Virginia Isbell:

Name: Mary Virginia Isbell
Event Type: Death
Event Date: 07 Feb 1940
Event Place: Lenoir, Caldwell, North Carolina
Birth Year: 1861
Burial Date: 08 Feb 1940
Cemetery: Isbell
Residence Place: Lenoir, NC
Gender: Female
Age: 78
Marital Status: Single
Race (Original): White
Occupation: None
Birth Date: 06 Oct 1861
Birthplace: Nc
Father’s Name: J M Isbell
Father’s Birthplace: Nc
Mother’s Name: Sarah Horton
Mother’s Birthplace: Nc
Reference ID: fn 2164 cn 279
GS Film number: 1943179[10]

Death of daughter Sarah Louise Isbell:

Name: Sarah Louise Setzer
Event Type: Death
Event Date: 18 Aug 1955
Event Place: Morganton, Burke, N. C.
Birth Year: 1875
Burial Date: 20 Aug 1955
Burial Place: Caldwell Co., N. C.
Cemetery: Grandin Bapt.
Gender: Female
Age: 80
Marital Status: Married
Race (Original): White
Occupation: Seamstress
Birth Date: 10 May 1875
Birthplace: Caldwell Co., N. C.
Father’s Name: James Martin Isbell
Mother’s Name: Sarah Louisa Horton
Reference ID: v 18A cn 18416
GS Film number: 1927217[11]

Death of daughter Sarah Frances Isbell:

Name: Sarah Frances Thomas
Event Type: Death
Event Date: 28 Sep 1964
Event Place: Lenoir, Caldwell, North Carolina
Birth Year: 1873
Burial Date: 29 Sep 1964
Burial Place: Caldwell County, North Carolina
Cemetery: Grandin Baptist Cemetery
Residence Place: Lenoir, Caldwell, North Carolina
Address: 208 Vance Street
Gender: Female
Age: 91
Marital Status: Widowed
Race (Original): white
Occupation: Housewife, Ret.Teacher
Birth Date: 03 Feb 1873
Birthplace: Caldwell County, North Carolina
Father’s Name: James M. Isbell
Mother’s Name: Sarah Louise Horton
Spouse’s Name: J. W. Thomas
Reference ID: v 27A cn 27083
GS Film number: 1953510[12]

James M. Isbell and Sarah Louise Horton Isbell are still head of household in the 1910 Census for Kings Creek, Caldwell County, North Carolina. They still have some children residing with them.[13]

His wife, Sarah Horton Isbell, died in Jan. 1919 and the death certificate stated she was a widow.

The original memorial created by Autumn on Find-A-Grave states:

Burial:
James Martin Isbell
Isbell Cemetery (uncertain as to the location)
  • His wife’s death certificate stated burial at Isbell Cemetery.

(Location of the Isbell Cemetery was probably at the site of the Isbell plantation.)

The joint tombstone of Colonel James Martin Isbell and wife Saray Horton Isbell’s grave is at Grandin Baptist Church Cemetery.

Biography written by Carolyn Murray Greer 13 Sep 2017

Sources

  1. Find A Grave Memorial# 52594193
  2. Western North Carolina: A History (1730-1913) By John Preston Arthur,1914), p.81
  3. Western North Carolina: A History (1730-1913) By John Preston Arthur,1914), p.82
  4. Western North Carolina: A History (1730-1913) By John Preston Arthur,1914), p.95
  5. “Trail of Daniel Boone,” Skyland Magazine, by John P Arthur, 1:652 (S 1914)
  6. 1850 United States Federal Census Record, Kings Creek, Caldwell, North Carolina
  7. Citing this Record: “North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979 ,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FZ1Z-X25 : 22 December 2016), James M. Isbell and Sarah Louisa Horton, 01 Mar 1857; citing , Caldwell, North Carolina, United States, p. V. 1-5 p19, Office of Archives and History, Division of Archives and Records. State Archive of North Carolina and various county Register of Deeds; FHL microfilm 590,352
  8. The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), Publication Number: M593, GS Film number: 000552626, Digital Folder Number: 004277203, Image Number: 00052
  9. Citing this Record: “United States Census, 1870,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MW8H-C12 : 12 April 2016), James M Isbell, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 2, family 16, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,626
  10. Citing this Record: “North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FPK8-Q9F : 17 July 2017), J M Isbell in entry for Mary Virginia Isbell, 07 Feb 1940; citing Lenoir, Caldwell, North Carolina, fn 2164 cn 279, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,943,179
  11. Citing this Record: “North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FPDY-DBC : 17 July 2017), James Martin Isbell in entry for Sarah Louise Setzer, 18 Aug 1955; citing Morganton, Burke, N. C., v 18A cn 18416, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,927,217
  12. Citing this Record: “North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FG1X-8VG : 18 July 2017), James M. Isbell in entry for Sarah Frances Thomas, 28 Sep 1964; citing Lenoir, Caldwell, North Carolina, v 27A cn 27083, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,953,510
  13. 1910 United States Federal Census, Kings Creek, Caldwell County, North Carolina

A peach of a man…

is our first known immigrant ancestor with the surname of Menefee. Carolyn Murray Greer wrote this biography which is posted on WikiTree for the progenitor of the Menefee family…which extends down to Giles County, Tennessee and into northern Alabama.

Name

George Menefee Esquire, spelled Minifye in earliest documents

Birth

Born: circa 1596
Devon, England, UK

Parents

Probable: George Minifie and wife Mary Pendleton

Siblings

Sister Minife who married John Bishopp
Sister Menife who married Roger Booker
William Minifie who George Minifye sponsored in 1639

Spouses

Jane Pierce
Mary Potts

Marriages

Married first to widow of John Rolfe whose maiden names was Jane Pierce
Married second to
Married third to
Married fourth to Mary Potts

Children

Elizabeth Minifye who married Capt Henry Perry by Mary Potts

Immigration to America

Name: George Minifie
Arrival Year: 1623
Arrival Place: Virginia
Source Publication Code: 3520
Primary Immigrant: Minifie, George
Annotation: From state papers in the Public Record Office, London, a census of the inhabitants of Virginia taken between January 20 and February 7, 1624 or 1625. Lists 1,232 names, with ages and ships taken. Item no. 1272, Colonial Records of Virginia, has many more[1]
Page: 31

Death

His death date is given as 1646 in records I have researched.

Burial

1645
Parish Church of Weston(Westover) Virginia

The name Menefee has had numerous spelling variations over the centuries. Some spelled the name: Minife, Minefie, Minifye, Menifye and other variations of the surname, but the most prevalent spelling has become the surname written as Menefee. Those Menefee men were important people to lend their name to the history and the formation of this country, the great United States of America.

First settled by the English colonists in 1607 at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, the County was formally created in 1634 as James City Shire by order of King Charles I. James City County is considered one of only five original shires of Virginia to still be extant today in essentially the same political form.

To further information on his immigration to America, George Menifie, who was born in 1596 or 1597, came to Virginia in 1623 on the Samuell from Wiltshire, England.

George Menefee is listed as counted among the living in James City on the first census taken in February of the year 1623. This first census was taken after the 1622 great Indian massacre who took the lives of a quarter of the 1,240 inhabitants within an hour of the start of the bloody ordeal.[2]

George Minify was listed among those in the VA Early Census Index in 1624. He lived in Virginia Pioneer Township, James City County in Virginia.[3]

George was born about 1596. George Menefee passed away in 1646. George Menefee was responsible for bringing over immigrants from England and with each sponsorship he received a grant of land.

In 1639 George Menefee sponsored William Minifie to be brought over to Charles City with a large group of people, and George received a bounty land warrant of acreage in Charles City.[4]

George Menifie arrived in Virginia in 1623, was Burgess for James City County, 1629, and member of the Council, 1635-1646.He was one the wealthiest men of his day in the Colony, and was probably the leading merchant.

In 1634 he lived at “Littleton,” or “Littletown,”‘ not far below Jamestown.His large garden here ” contained fruits of Holland and Roses of Provence.” His orchard was planted with apple, pear and cherry trees, and peach trees. George Menifie introduced the first peach trees to America as he cultivated the first peach trees.Around the house grew, in the fashion of the times, rosemary, thyme, and marjoram.He took a prominent part in the deposition of Governor Harvey.

Later he removed to “Buckland,” an estate of 8,ooo acres in Charles City County. His only child, Elizabeth Menifie, married Captain Henry Perry of Charles City County. Captain Perry was a member of the Council. They left two daughters and co-heiresses. Daughter Elizabeth Perry married John Coggs, gentleman, of Rainslip, Middlesex, Esq. Daughter Mary Perry married Thomas Mercer, stationer, of London.

George Menifie helped raise an native american boy after he reached about ten years of age. It can be presumed that he took care of him after the death of William Perry. The following is an account:

Pg 281
[June 10, 1640.] Mr. George MeniFye, Esqr., this day presented to the court an indian boy of the country of Tappahannock, Christened and for the time of ten years brought up amongst the english by Captain William Perry, deceased, and […]”The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography”
Pg 282
Mr. George Menifye: the indian was examined and found to have been well instructed in the principles of religion, taught to read, instructed to writing: and whereas there hath formerly been given by will, a stock of three hundred pounds sterling by Nicholas Farrar, late of London, Merchant, deceased, by [for?] the Indians, whereof 24 pounds sterling was yearly to be paid to any person that should bring up three of the indian children the said Mr. Menifye for his better supportation in the education of the said indian boy desire certificate from the court of the bringing him up and instructing him in christian religion as is said: the governor and council approving and commending the care that hath been used towards this youth have condescended to the request of the said Mr. Menifye and have thought goo to recommend hereby his suit for the allowance of 8 pounds per annum, part of the said 24 pounds. towards the maintenande the said youth and to that purpose in testimony of the premises have thought good to cause the seal of the colony to be hereunto affixed.Given at James city the tenth day of June, a domini 1640.[5]

The site of old Westover Church, near the house at “Westover,” still contains a number of tombs formerly in or near the old building. The name John James supplies information as to one of the early ministers of the parish. John Bishop was an early resident of Charles City County, as was Walter Aston. Howell Price was once clerk of the county. Virginia Council, 1641.

George Menefye was present at Court held at James City October 13, 1641. Those in attendance were:Sir Francis Wyat, Knt., Governor, Captain John West, Captain Wm. Pierce, Mr. George Menefye, Mr. Wm. Brocas, Mr. Amb. Harmer, Mr. Richmond Bennet.

The land owned by George Menifye, at least at the time, might be located using the information from this source:

[…]The area of the plat of John Harvey being given, also its northern boundary. Back Street, its eastern boundary “the Swamp lying on the East side of the said New Towne,” its southern boundary, **upon the highway close to the banke of the Main river, the approximate position of the tract was ascer- tained after several trials.

From the descriptions of the Harvey and Hamor tracts the position of those of George Menefy J and Richard Stephens, and also those of the two cross streets, all of which are men- tioned in the descriptions of the two first named, were readily found, and finally the tract of John Chew, all as shown on the Map of lames City, Va., 1607-1698.

N. B. — Lines indicated on the *’ Plat of the Tracts ** by numbers I, 2, 3, 4, II, 10, 9, are part of Sherwood (5) survey. [6]

Will

GEORGE MENEFIE of Buckland in Virginia, Esquire.Will 31 December 1645; proved 25 February 1646-7.To be buried at discretion of my wife in parish Church of Weston [Westover]. All debts in Virginia to be satisfied.All Tobacco or money debts in England to be transferred to my books, “The shipp Desire now Iyeinge before Buckland may with all possible expedition be dispatched way for England, and to bee part loaded with what Tobacco is ready here above, and receive the remainder of her ladeinge belowe, vizt, tooe hundred Hoggsheads on the partable account” 100 hoggshead my own account and the rest by discretion of a note to be found in a small book of tobacco shipped and to be shipped.
My 100 hogsheads and my part in the ship Desire and cargo, and my 1-16 part of the William and George be consigned to Captain Peter Andrews, he to give an exact account to my heirs and executors.
To my daughter Elizabeth Menefie all my land at Weston, att James Citty, and at Yorke River.
To my brother John Bishopp, the money he owes me, and one-third part of my crop of Tobacco made the last summer at my plantation of Buckland.
My sheep at Buckland to be a joint stock between my daughter Elizabeth, and son-in-law Henry Perry.
To Mr. Jo. James £20 and 1000 lbs of Tobacco, he to preach a sermon at my funeral.
To Mr. Jo. Converse, Chirurgeon, 2000 lbs of Tobacco.
To my brother Roger Booker £50, he to assist Humphrey Lister in collecting my debts.
To Jo. White, Merchant, £50, provided he continue one year longer in Virginia and collect my debts as formerly.
Tobacco not able to go in the Desire to be sent in the Flower of London Goods consigned in the William and George to be returned in Kind.
Everything to my wife and daughter.Executrix and guardian to my daughter; my wife Mary.
Tobacco due to me from Captaine Tho. Varvell shall be Satisfied by Walter Aston. Satisfaction to be made to Mr. Humfrey Adlington for his care in my business concerning Chamberlaine, by Captaine Peter Andrews. Overseers friends Captain Peter Andrews, Richard Bennett, Esq.
Witnesses Howell Prise, Hunifrey Lister.Fines, 31.

Sources

  1. Source Bibliography: JESTER, ANNIE LASH, and MARTHA WOODROOF HIDEN. “Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia 1624/1625.” In Adventurers of Purse and Person; Virginia, 1607-1625. N.p.: Order of First Families of Virginia, 1607-1620 [Princeton University Press], 1956, pp. 5-69.
  2. Original Lists of Person of Quality, by Hotters
  3. Virginia, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1607-1890
  4. Complete listing of Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666 (from book published 1912 by George Cabell Greer, now copyright-free)
  5. The Virginia Council & General Court Records 1640-1641 From Robinson’s notes, Virginia Historical Society Collection.
  6. Virginia Land Patent Record, Book I, p. 3. t /did, Book I, p. 5. J /did, Book I, p. 4.

A journal of a life of memories…

has been written in parts by Beth Terry Murray. She has approved our posting some of them here. They will come in the parts as written. Enjoy.

One Man’s Life (cont.)

I should mention here that most people remember him being called Wilbo or as his family called him “Bo”.

We had been living in a house next door to my Uncle Glen and Aunt Stella, I loved it because I got to see my cousin Pam every day and there were kids around the neighborhood that we saw all the time. In that house we slept on a sleep porch at the back, my daddy and Ricky slept in a full size bed at the very end of the porch, then I slept in a baby bed that was turned to touch the foot of their bed, and my mother slept in a half bed that touched the end of the baby bed. Yes…..from what I remember I slept in that baby bed until we moved into our new house in 1961, where I had my own bedroom with a new bedroom suit.

Mother had inherited 4 1\2 acres when her parents died and my daddy had bought one of her sisters 4 1\2 acres which then meant he had 9 acres. I really didn’t know what exactly that meant, but I knew by the smile on his face that it meant a lot to him. He bought me and my brother Shetland Ponies and himself several Black Angus Cows. Now the cows were by no means a huge herd, but it was his dream to have something that belonged to him and his own family that he could love and knew would always be there for him. I never doubted for one minute that he loved me and would have done anything for me. As a matter of fact, I remember when we were studying how to tell time in school. I could not get the hang of it and when the teacher would give us a test on clocks I would break out in a cold sweat. My daddy knew I couldn’t read clocks so he took off work 1\2 a day when I was out of school. He went into his and mother’s bedroom and got his Big Ben alarm clock and sat with me all afternoon until the light went on over my head and I had the hang of it.

His mother moved to Town Creek when I was about 8 years old, and he treated her as if she had never left. By the time she came home my grandfather Tom had been killed in Leighton at a little store he managed. A man had come in late one night and stabbed him to death. When Mama Terry moved back to Town Creek it was as if she never left, daddy went to see her every morning before he went to work. His work consisted of being a meter reader for the gas department, I know he would mention wanting a higher paying job periodically, but with the one he had he got to talk to people and that was something he loved to do. He came into my bedroom every Sunday morning and read the comic paper to me, in a very deep voice. To my knowledge he never culled anybody, no one was beneath him or better than him. He never met a stranger and he helped anyone that he saw in need. He called the brothers and sisters that lived out of town to schedule vacations and to let them know when they were expected to be home. I can assure you if Bo wanted you at home at that time, then you were home. The brothers and sisters would fish and sit around and talk about all the old times. Most of the kids would sit there and listen as long as we could, at least until the mosquito’s came out.