The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Casey

Generals friends of Generals…

in the Revolutionary War and forward…hmmm now how could that impact a family heritage?

Colonel and then Lieutenant Levi Casey and likely his brothers and father fought alongside of some of the most famous generals in history. General Francis Marion “The Swamp Fox” and General Thomas Sumter to name two. General Thomas Sumter and Levi Casey were close friends.

South Carolina Generals

Francis Marion (1732 – 1795) was born in Berkeley County, S.C. A planter, he had fought against the Cherokees in 1759 and 1761, and when the American Revolution began, he volunteered and led “irregulars” in several engagements; because his sprained ankle had led him to leave Charleston, S.C., before its surrender to the British, he was available to command the remaining resistance in South Carolina after the colonials’ loss at Camden, S.C. Known as the “Swamp Fox” because the British Col. Tarleton called him “this damned old fox” and because he operated out of a secret hideout on a river island, he used guerrilla tactics to strike at stronger British and Loyalist forces, disrupting enemy communications, capturing supplies, and freeing prisoners before disappearing into the wilderness. From 1781 on he led his troops under Gen. Nathaniel Greene. After the war, he served in the South Carolina senate and commanded Fort Johnson in Charleston harbor (1784–90).

William Washington was born on February 28, 1752 in Stafford County, Virginia. His parents intended him to join the ministry and sent him to study with a theologian. However, in early 1776 he accepted a captain’s commission in the Continental Army commanded by his cousin, George Washington, and then fought at Long Island, Trenton (where he was wounded), and Princeton. In 1780, he transferred to the Army’s Southern Division and fought in a series of skirmishes around Charleston. The following year, he led his cavalry to victory in close combat with British regulars at Cowpens. His success there, in particular his hand-to-hand saber battle with the British commander Tarleton, earned Washington a Congressional medal. He then joined the American forces in North Carolina for battles at Guilford Courthouse, Hobkirks Hill, and Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded and captured. He remained a paroled prisoner-of-war in Charleston until the city’s evacuation by the British at the end of 1782. After the war, Washington stayed in Charleston, where he served in the state legislature. He later refused a gubernatorial nomination, but in 1798 returned to public service as a brigadier general for service in America’s undeclared naval war with France. Washington died on March 6, 1810.

Thomas Sumter (1734 – 1832) was born in Hanover County, Va. Raised on the frontier, a veteran of the French and Indian War, he settled in South Carolina in 1765. During the American Revolution he led a partisan campaign against the British in the Carolinas and the success of his small force gained him the nickname, “Gamecock of the Revolution” (and led to his name being given to the island-fort off Charleston where the Civil War began). After the war, Sumter sat in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate.

Andrew Pickens, 1739 — 1817 was born near Paxtang, Pa. The son of Irish immigrants, he settled in South Carolina in 1763. In the American Revolution, he helped defeat the Loyalist forces at Kettle Creek, Ga., contributed to the decisive victory at Cowpens, S.C. (1781), and commanded the forces that captured Augusta, Ga.


Ever wonder what others from family lines looked like?

The following is a pdf file with an article from the White River Valley Historical Quartlery in the issued dated Spring 1964. It traces our Abner Casey’s lineage from the Tyrone County, Ireland to Taney County, Missouri. Some photos are included of those lines. Enjoy. Click on the hyperlink below to access the article.

Caseys from Tyrone County Ireland to Taney County Missouri article from White River Valley Histroical qtrly


She did too die…

in Lawrence County, Alabama even if the state has no record of her death. Conversely that means that she lived. Yes, she lived and died in Lawrence County, Alabama. She was born in 1884 in Lauderdale County, Alabama. Her family originally resided at a community named Rawhide, but she was born in the area known now as Center Star near Gabriel Butler’s Bluewater Creek cemetery and on Chief Doublehead‘s former Reserve property. She lived there until

Willie Viola Casey Peebles' obituary

Obituary was published Monday, 4 December 1939 in the Decatur Daily

shortly after the 1900 Federal Census was enumerated. Then  she moved with her husband to his stamping ground in Lawrence County, Alabama. It was there she died in 1939.  But, The state has no death certificate on file for Willie Viola Casey Peebles. Numerous attempts to obtain an official death certificate has resulted in a response of are you sure she did not die in another state. I would stomp my little feet and say, I am SURE she died in Lawrence County, Alabama. I can take you to her grave and show you her marker. I can show you her obituary from the Decatur Daily Newspaper dated 4 December 1939. OH, yes, she lived.

In 1888 records of Goodsprings Church in Center Star, she is listed as a member of the church. That is the same church that Gabriel Butler helped establish. It was a lovely little white wooden church and should have been of great historical value but since then it had been added on to and now is bricked, so how much of its historical value is left is not for me to say. I just know that every time I have driven or gone by that little church, I always think of her.

Her maiden name was Willie Viola Casey. She was undoubtedly named after her father Willis Robert Lucas Casey. A measure of how much she was loved by family might be indicated by the fact that at least two descendants were named in her honor. My mother and other grandchildren lovingly called her ‘Willmaw.” She married George Washington Peebles (Maj) and became the mother of  eleven known children.

One of her grandsons recalled her fondly. He stated that she was a very religious woman. His favorite memory of her was her singing. He stated that she could sing every bit as well as Loretta Lynn. He recalled that on bringing the family cow up for milking that she would be singing the song “Amazing Grace.” He cherished that memory.

My mother’s memory of her always seemed wistful if her body language was any indication. Mother talked of her having breast cancer. As she recalled the next part, her face would show the pain she felt at the recall of those memories. She stated that her grandpa  told Willmaw that if she had her breasts cut off she could no longer live in his house. Mother said that Willmaw did not have her breasts cut off; and that her grandpa got his way of her not living, at least living very long, in his house. She said Willmaw didn’t live long after that in his house, and I shuddered at the thought. Perhaps this is the reason that in my grown up years I am so adamant that only a woman can govern her own body as it has never been Government Issue.

Mother would go on to talk about going to Willmaw’s funeral. If I recall correctly, it was Luke who drove an old school bus and took all those who cared to ride to Willmaw’s funeral at Cottingham Cemetery. The cemetery is located just off the highway. Back in the 1960s when I would take Mother and others around to the cemeteries Cottingham Cemetery would pretty much tear your car up if you drove back to it. There was a little loop around the cemetery that circles the cemetery. After a business located and built their shop near it, they improved the road and a car could easily maneuver back there and all around the little cemetery. 

Getting there was likely an adventure for the kids like my mother, but nothing would compare with the return trip. She stated that Luke drove the bus and that Luther would lean out the door of the old decrepid school bus and  hold a coal oil lamp to try to illuminate the way to drive back home. It must have been a long, long trip back home under those circumstances. It left a little tear in her heart for the rest of her life.


Error, omission or Oversight?

WHSP-C-07275-18 Anwar Sadat, Jimmy Carter and ...

Anwar Sadat, Jimmy Carter, and Menahem Begin at Camp David

It was the land called Oversight. The Jacob Duckett of the following text is the father of Elizabeth Duckett who married our Gen Levi Casey of Revolutionary War fame. Gen Levi Casey was also a Congressman, and  a South Carolina State Representative. The text of the document follows that is entitled The Land Called “Oversight

The colony of Maryland emerged with a group of 200 people sailing on the ships, the Arc and the Dove from England, arriving in 1634. The land was given by Royal Charter to George Calvert, 1st Lord of Baltimore. He died before the document was signed and his son, Cecilius Calvert assumed rulership of a ten million acre tract of wilderness known as Maryland and Delaware, today.

Jacob Duckett (1714-1764) owned 85 acres of land situated in Frederick Co., MD called “Oversight.” William Boteler, born 1738 in Frederick Co., MD, and who was married to Ann Duckett, daughter of Jacob Duckett, inherited this 85 acre land situated in Frederick, Co., MD called “Oversight” from his wife’s father. Women were not allowed to inherit land at this time. According to the Will of Jacob Duckett, Ann Duckett Boteler received a cow and a calf from her father’s estate, as was befitting in those times for women. Her husband inherited the land called “Oversight.” The acreage was later sold to James Sergant for 150 pounds. The land lies between Catoctain and the Blue Ridge Mountains.

The same land known as “Oversight,” was changed by the 32nd president of the United States, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, (FDR). The land was developed through the “New Deal,” under the “Works Progress Administration,” (WPA) The ‘great depression” of 1929-1941 created jobs for the many out of work. The land was created into a National Park and Presidential Retreat, renamed, “Shangra-la.”

Dwight David Eisenhower, 34th President of the United States, saw fit for another name, “Camp David,” after his son David Eisenhower, Jr. “Camp David,” has been available for eleven different presidents over a 66 year period. During that interval, many negotiations took place there.

One was with President Jimmy Carter, a peanut farmer and nuclear physicist from Plains, GA. He set up the, “Camp David Accords,” to work for peace in the Middle East. When the peace talks stalled, President Jimmy Carter invited Sadat and Begin with their senior aides to the presidential retreat, “Camp David.” After 13 days of negotiations, the leaders announced the conclusion of the accords, which provided the basis for continuing peace in the Middle East and between Egypt and Israel. Sadat and Begin received the Nobel Peace Prize in December 1979 for their great efforts.

References: Moravian Families of Carroll’s Manor, ppg. 113-14; Maryland & Virginia Colonies, ppg. 184, Doliante; Land Records of Prince George’s Co., MD 1726-1730, ppg. 7 and 39; Encarta Encyclopedia, Grolier Encyclopedia; Encyclopedia Americana.