The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Carolyn Murray Greer

A peach of a man…

is our first known immigrant ancestor with the surname of Menefee. Carolyn Murray Greer wrote this biography which is posted on WikiTree for the progenitor of the Menefee family…which extends down to Giles County, Tennessee and into northern Alabama.

Name

George Menefee Esquire, spelled Minifye in earliest documents

Birth

Born: circa 1596
Devon, England, UK

Parents

Probable: George Minifie and wife Mary Pendleton

Siblings

Sister Minife who married John Bishopp
Sister Menife who married Roger Booker
William Minifie who George Minifye sponsored in 1639

Spouses

Jane Pierce
Mary Potts

Marriages

Married first to widow of John Rolfe whose maiden names was Jane Pierce
Married second to
Married third to
Married fourth to Mary Potts

Children

Elizabeth Minifye who married Capt Henry Perry by Mary Potts

Immigration to America

Name: George Minifie
Arrival Year: 1623
Arrival Place: Virginia
Source Publication Code: 3520
Primary Immigrant: Minifie, George
Annotation: From state papers in the Public Record Office, London, a census of the inhabitants of Virginia taken between January 20 and February 7, 1624 or 1625. Lists 1,232 names, with ages and ships taken. Item no. 1272, Colonial Records of Virginia, has many more[1]
Page: 31

Death

His death date is given as 1646 in records I have researched.

Burial

1645
Parish Church of Weston(Westover) Virginia

The name Menefee has had numerous spelling variations over the centuries. Some spelled the name: Minife, Minefie, Minifye, Menifye and other variations of the surname, but the most prevalent spelling has become the surname written as Menefee. Those Menefee men were important people to lend their name to the history and the formation of this country, the great United States of America.

First settled by the English colonists in 1607 at Jamestown in the Virginia Colony, the County was formally created in 1634 as James City Shire by order of King Charles I. James City County is considered one of only five original shires of Virginia to still be extant today in essentially the same political form.

To further information on his immigration to America, George Menifie, who was born in 1596 or 1597, came to Virginia in 1623 on the Samuell from Wiltshire, England.

George Menefee is listed as counted among the living in James City on the first census taken in February of the year 1623. This first census was taken after the 1622 great Indian massacre who took the lives of a quarter of the 1,240 inhabitants within an hour of the start of the bloody ordeal.[2]

George Minify was listed among those in the VA Early Census Index in 1624. He lived in Virginia Pioneer Township, James City County in Virginia.[3]

George was born about 1596. George Menefee passed away in 1646. George Menefee was responsible for bringing over immigrants from England and with each sponsorship he received a grant of land.

In 1639 George Menefee sponsored William Minifie to be brought over to Charles City with a large group of people, and George received a bounty land warrant of acreage in Charles City.[4]

George Menifie arrived in Virginia in 1623, was Burgess for James City County, 1629, and member of the Council, 1635-1646.He was one the wealthiest men of his day in the Colony, and was probably the leading merchant.

In 1634 he lived at “Littleton,” or “Littletown,”‘ not far below Jamestown.His large garden here ” contained fruits of Holland and Roses of Provence.” His orchard was planted with apple, pear and cherry trees, and peach trees. George Menifie introduced the first peach trees to America as he cultivated the first peach trees.Around the house grew, in the fashion of the times, rosemary, thyme, and marjoram.He took a prominent part in the deposition of Governor Harvey.

Later he removed to “Buckland,” an estate of 8,ooo acres in Charles City County. His only child, Elizabeth Menifie, married Captain Henry Perry of Charles City County. Captain Perry was a member of the Council. They left two daughters and co-heiresses. Daughter Elizabeth Perry married John Coggs, gentleman, of Rainslip, Middlesex, Esq. Daughter Mary Perry married Thomas Mercer, stationer, of London.

George Menifie helped raise an native american boy after he reached about ten years of age. It can be presumed that he took care of him after the death of William Perry. The following is an account:

Pg 281
[June 10, 1640.] Mr. George MeniFye, Esqr., this day presented to the court an indian boy of the country of Tappahannock, Christened and for the time of ten years brought up amongst the english by Captain William Perry, deceased, and […]”The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography”
Pg 282
Mr. George Menifye: the indian was examined and found to have been well instructed in the principles of religion, taught to read, instructed to writing: and whereas there hath formerly been given by will, a stock of three hundred pounds sterling by Nicholas Farrar, late of London, Merchant, deceased, by [for?] the Indians, whereof 24 pounds sterling was yearly to be paid to any person that should bring up three of the indian children the said Mr. Menifye for his better supportation in the education of the said indian boy desire certificate from the court of the bringing him up and instructing him in christian religion as is said: the governor and council approving and commending the care that hath been used towards this youth have condescended to the request of the said Mr. Menifye and have thought goo to recommend hereby his suit for the allowance of 8 pounds per annum, part of the said 24 pounds. towards the maintenande the said youth and to that purpose in testimony of the premises have thought good to cause the seal of the colony to be hereunto affixed.Given at James city the tenth day of June, a domini 1640.[5]

The site of old Westover Church, near the house at “Westover,” still contains a number of tombs formerly in or near the old building. The name John James supplies information as to one of the early ministers of the parish. John Bishop was an early resident of Charles City County, as was Walter Aston. Howell Price was once clerk of the county. Virginia Council, 1641.

George Menefye was present at Court held at James City October 13, 1641. Those in attendance were:Sir Francis Wyat, Knt., Governor, Captain John West, Captain Wm. Pierce, Mr. George Menefye, Mr. Wm. Brocas, Mr. Amb. Harmer, Mr. Richmond Bennet.

The land owned by George Menifye, at least at the time, might be located using the information from this source:

[…]The area of the plat of John Harvey being given, also its northern boundary. Back Street, its eastern boundary “the Swamp lying on the East side of the said New Towne,” its southern boundary, **upon the highway close to the banke of the Main river, the approximate position of the tract was ascer- tained after several trials.

From the descriptions of the Harvey and Hamor tracts the position of those of George Menefy J and Richard Stephens, and also those of the two cross streets, all of which are men- tioned in the descriptions of the two first named, were readily found, and finally the tract of John Chew, all as shown on the Map of lames City, Va., 1607-1698.

N. B. — Lines indicated on the *’ Plat of the Tracts ** by numbers I, 2, 3, 4, II, 10, 9, are part of Sherwood (5) survey. [6]

Will

GEORGE MENEFIE of Buckland in Virginia, Esquire.Will 31 December 1645; proved 25 February 1646-7.To be buried at discretion of my wife in parish Church of Weston [Westover]. All debts in Virginia to be satisfied.All Tobacco or money debts in England to be transferred to my books, “The shipp Desire now Iyeinge before Buckland may with all possible expedition be dispatched way for England, and to bee part loaded with what Tobacco is ready here above, and receive the remainder of her ladeinge belowe, vizt, tooe hundred Hoggsheads on the partable account” 100 hoggshead my own account and the rest by discretion of a note to be found in a small book of tobacco shipped and to be shipped.
My 100 hogsheads and my part in the ship Desire and cargo, and my 1-16 part of the William and George be consigned to Captain Peter Andrews, he to give an exact account to my heirs and executors.
To my daughter Elizabeth Menefie all my land at Weston, att James Citty, and at Yorke River.
To my brother John Bishopp, the money he owes me, and one-third part of my crop of Tobacco made the last summer at my plantation of Buckland.
My sheep at Buckland to be a joint stock between my daughter Elizabeth, and son-in-law Henry Perry.
To Mr. Jo. James £20 and 1000 lbs of Tobacco, he to preach a sermon at my funeral.
To Mr. Jo. Converse, Chirurgeon, 2000 lbs of Tobacco.
To my brother Roger Booker £50, he to assist Humphrey Lister in collecting my debts.
To Jo. White, Merchant, £50, provided he continue one year longer in Virginia and collect my debts as formerly.
Tobacco not able to go in the Desire to be sent in the Flower of London Goods consigned in the William and George to be returned in Kind.
Everything to my wife and daughter.Executrix and guardian to my daughter; my wife Mary.
Tobacco due to me from Captaine Tho. Varvell shall be Satisfied by Walter Aston. Satisfaction to be made to Mr. Humfrey Adlington for his care in my business concerning Chamberlaine, by Captaine Peter Andrews. Overseers friends Captain Peter Andrews, Richard Bennett, Esq.
Witnesses Howell Prise, Hunifrey Lister.Fines, 31.

Sources

  1. Source Bibliography: JESTER, ANNIE LASH, and MARTHA WOODROOF HIDEN. “Musters of the Inhabitants in Virginia 1624/1625.” In Adventurers of Purse and Person; Virginia, 1607-1625. N.p.: Order of First Families of Virginia, 1607-1620 [Princeton University Press], 1956, pp. 5-69.
  2. Original Lists of Person of Quality, by Hotters
  3. Virginia, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1607-1890
  4. Complete listing of Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666 (from book published 1912 by George Cabell Greer, now copyright-free)
  5. The Virginia Council & General Court Records 1640-1641 From Robinson’s notes, Virginia Historical Society Collection.
  6. Virginia Land Patent Record, Book I, p. 3. t /did, Book I, p. 5. J /did, Book I, p. 4.

Will you be my hero?

John Birdwell is one of my heroes and ancestors. John Birdwell led a very storied life. He is the son of George Birdwell and Mary L Looney Birdwell. His father was a Revolutionary War Patriot. He is likely one of your, too, if your surnames include Allen, Looney, Harmon, Isbell, Murray, Birdwell, Gregory, Sparks, Lenz, and a myriad of others.

The featured image is where John Birdwell’s property was located in Mississippi Territory, later Madison County, Alabama. He owned property in Tennessee, and in the counties of Madison, Lawrence, Franklin County, and Fayette County, Alabama. He also owned property in Texas, Rusk County and possibly Nacogdoches County.

John Birdwell was born in the Bent of the James River (sound familiar Peebles family?) on 24 Sep 1770. He lived and owned property in the states of Tennessee, Alabama, and Texas. He died at Mt Enterprise, Rusk County, Texas on 16 Feb 1854 at the home of his son, Allen Birdwell. The account of his death is tragic.

The Birdwell descendants are eligible to join:

  • Iirst Families of Tennessee
  • First Families of Alabama
  • Daughters of the Republic of Texas
  • Sons of the Republic of Texas
  • Daughters of the American Revolution (#A098196)
  • Sons of the American Revolution
  • Colonial Dames of the XVII Century

He first came to Texas in 1838 by some accounts [4], while one reference gives a date as early as 1835, he did not move permanently until 1842 after the death of his wife, Mary Allen Birdwell. His son, Col. Allen B. Birdwell, wrote in his own notebook ledger that he moved to Texas in 1842 and that his father John Birdwell lived with him in Nacogdoches County[5]. John Birdwell was still living in Allen Birdwell’s household in Rusk County in the 1850 census. The Handbook Of Texas by the Texas State Historical Association, says: “Allen Birdwell’s father John may have moved to Nacogdoches County, Texas, in 1838, and Allen and his wife Lucinda (Ross) followed by 1842.” [6]

John Birdwell was in Houston on July 8, 1838, when he wrote a letter of recommendation for George Nixon which is preserved in the George Antonio Nixon manuscripts collection at the University of Texas Arlington [7]

A family history states that John Birdwell moved to Nacogdoches County in 1838 and “lived at Old North Church two years,” then moved twelve miles to Mt. Enterprise in what became Rusk County when Rusk was formed from part of Nacogdoches.

John Birdwell signed his will Jan. 24, 1854, and it was entered in Probate Court April 27, 1854.Will is provided as image in this narrative.

John Birdwell died Feb. 16, 1854. The estate included $1,400 cash and included slaves and possibly other property since Col. Allen B. Birdwell posted a $4,000 bond with the Rusk County Probate Court to serve as administrator of his father’s estate, a considerable bond in those days.[8]

FIRST FAMILIES OF TENNESSEE Descendants of John and Mary Birdwell are eligible for membership in the First Families of Tennessee, First Families of Alabama, the Sons of the Republic of Texas, and the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.

1770 John Birdwell and Mary Allen grew up in Sullivan County, N.C., which later became Sullivan County, Tennessee. They married and lived there several years before moving to Alabama.

1781 John Birdwell (born 1770 Virginia, died 1854 Texas) and wife Mary Allen… in 1781 were in Sullivan County, North Carolina (now Tennessee), 1809 Madison County, Alabama; 1819 Lawrence County, Alabama.[9]

FIRST FAMILIES OF ALABAMA 1805 The Birdwells settled in Madison County, Alabama in 1805, where they were charter members of the Enon Baptist Church which later became First Baptist Church of Huntsville. John Birdwell was the first clerk. (Alabama Historical Society marker in Marshall County lists their daughter “Sarah Birdwell Isbell, one of the earliest settlers of Madison County, 1805.” His son Allen Birdwell stated in his ledger that his parents took him to Alabama in 1805, when he was three years old).

1808 “Birdwell Family Tree” by Velma Stovey Schonder, p. 59: “JHB thinks that JB was living in Madison Co., AL by 1808. He was one of the organizers and first clerk of The First Baptist Church in Huntsville, AL. …The church minutes for 6-1-1811 state that the church authorized Brethren Watkins, Pruet Brock, Birdwell and Powell to view a place for a meeting house (Dale Langston, from microfilm notes at Madison Co. Library Heritage Room, Huntsville). “JB is on the 1809 census Madison Co. Al/Ms Territory, p.7, with 2 males under 21, 1 male over 21, 6 females under 21 and 1 female over 21. According to JHB his last 4 children were born there, while his first 4 children married there.” Page 23 (different version, p.72): “John Birdwell…moved Tx 1838.”

1809 Enon Baptist Church Records (Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama), Sept. (2?), 1809:

1809 September (1st?) Saturday 1809. 1st The Church Met & after Prayer proceeded to Business– …5th The Church Appoints Brother Birdwell to Write the Association Letter & Bring the same to next meeting–

1810 Enon Baptist Church Records, Sept. 1, 1810: September 1st Saturday–1810 The Church met and after proceeded to business– 1st Opened a door for the reception of member– 2nd the church took up a reference from last meeting and laid it over till next meeting– 3rd The Church agree to delegate Bros. Hellums, Childress and Birdwell to The Association.

1818 Madison Co. DB E, p. 133 #500: item 500: dated 8-18-1818 Grantor, John & Mary Birdwell Grantee, George Oglethorpe Gilmer For the sum of $3300 Ind. SW/4 Sec. 18-2-E lying east of Briar Fork of Flint River, & 10 Ac. in 3/2 & 10 a. N/2 NW4 sec. 17-2-1E. Proven 11-3-1818 & DR (Pope) (Note: 10 a. in S/2) purchased by Birdwell from Joseph Powell. Witnessed by: Lewis B. Taliaferro, Jacob Pruett, and Levi Isbell. [10]

1818 1818, Aug. 18 – Madison County, Alabama; John Birdwell and wife Mary deeded land to George. Oglethorpe Gilmer. Witnesses: Lewis B. Taliaferro, Jacob Pruitt, Levi Isbell. Levi Isbell was John and Mary Birdwell’s son-in-law. [11]

1819 In January 1819 John and Mary Birdwell moved to Lawrence County, Alabama where they purchased large tracts of land and were also founders of this church,Birdwell Springs Baptist Church, which later changed its name to Enon Baptist Primitive Baptist Church. They were both established within the Mississippi Territory since Alabama was still a part of the native american nation and not yet a state.

The First 200 Years of the First Baptist Church of Huntsville [Alabama] gives the origin of that Enon Church as several years earlier: “All of Enon’s very first members were squatters since the government’s Nashville land office, which handled the sale of Madison County lands, did not even open for business in the Madison County area until August 1810, more than a year after Enon was established.[12]

Page 3: “After having met in private homes for two years, the church in June 1811 appointed a committee —- William Watkins, Jack Prewit, Isaac Brock, John Birdwell, and Joseph Powell –‘to view a place for a meeting house.’ That led to the start of construction of a log building on the western bank of the Brier Fork of Flint River, a few hundred yards north of the present terminal of the North Huntsville Executive Airport. The small building, exact location unknown, was close to the river bank…, affording a convenient place for baptismal services. For some reason, perhaps a shortage of funds, construction was halted short of completion. Almost two years later, Feb. 6, 1813, a new committee was named, consisting mostly of the first group plus William Hellums, to complete the work, and while there was apparently no fanfare to herald its conclusion, the structure was finished and in 1815 did accommodate the second annual meeting of the Flint River Association. …”with regard to the squatter hypothesis, it is interesting to note that the providers of Enon’s one-acre lot, John Birdwell and Joseph Powell, did not themselves receive title to their jointly-held property until April 1814, the church construction having begun on their proffered land three years earlier. But things were ‘looser,’ less formal in those days.”[13]

A History of Early Settlement: Madison County Before Statehood,” The Huntsville Historical Review (2008) by the Huntsville-Madison County Historical Society provides this information of the church and its: “The closest meetinghouse was Enon Baptist Church on the Briar Fork of the Flint Reiver. Established in 1809, one of its three founders, and its first pastor, was a preacher who lived and owned two pieces of property in the region, John Canterbury. There is no evidence that he was a slaveholder, but the second Enon pastor, Richard Shackelford, was a major landowner who at his death had more than a dozen slaves. He was called as a pastor in 1815 and served until his death in 1823. Enon’s first meetinghouse was a lot building constructed in 1813 on the Briar Fork. (This is on land of the present Madison County Executive Airport.) [14] “Joseph Powell and John Birdwell, charter members of the Enon Church, jointly owned the land adjacent to land owned by both Canterbury and Shackelford. The church building had been erected and in use for a year before Powell and Birdwell themselves received title to the property that they had provided to the church.” [15]

1819 1st Saturday January 1819 (Jan.2) “John Birdwell and Mary his wife” were granted letter of dismissal from the Enon Church in Madison County on the first Saturday in January, Jan. 2, 1819. (ref., First Baptist Church Minutes, James K. Harrison, First Baptist Church History Committee.)

They moved to Lawrence County near Moulton and established a new church.

1819 “F.W. Helmbold, Curator of the Society, in his historical presentation, revealed the fact that the Enon church was constituted originally as Birdwell Springs Baptist Church on the third Monday in June (June 21), 1819.”[16]

1820 The 1820 Federal Census Record reads: Lawrence County, AL.

John Birdwell & wife over 21,
3 sons under 21,
6 daughters under 21.

The 1820 Federal Census Record in Franklin County, Alabama has John Birdwell listed there as well. He owned property in many places.

The 1820 Federal Census Record for Giles County, Tennessee lists a John Birdwell, but this one is John Birdwell’s nephew John (son of Robert) and family His nephew was probably the John Birdwell in Giles County, Tennessee.

1820 John Birdwell was assigned by an act of the Alabama legislature to review the Flint River in Cotaco County (later Morgan) Alabama, from its junction with the Tennessee to its main fork, to see if it was navigable [17]

3 Dec 1820 “On December 6, 1820, an act of the Alabama Legislature was approved which designated David Parker, Jonathan Burleson, and John Birdwell, or any two of them, to make a careful “review” of Flint River, from its mouth to the main fork therein, and report the practicability of its navigation, the distance examined, and the expense necessary to improve the river for navigation. On the 20th of December an act was approved to incorporate the Flint River Navigation Co. The incorporators were Fleming Jordan, George Taylor, James McCartney, John Sprowl, Stephen Pond, John P. Brown, John Grayson, Dial Perry, David Walker, Ebenezer Byram, Stephen McBroom, William Derrick, and David Cobb, and they were authorized to improve the navigation of the Flint River in Madison County, from Capt. Scott’s Mills to the Tennessee River. Section 2 of the act provided a penalty of $3 for each day a tree cut or felled into the stream so as to obstruct navigation was allowed to remain, the proceeds of such fine to be applied to the improvement of the river.”[18] The Act is quoted in Alabama Genealogical Quarterly, vol. 1, p.216, and also the Alabama Genealogical Society, Inc., Magazine (1976) vol. 18, issue 1-4, p.38.

Owen, op. cit., p. 595: “It does not appear that much, if any, work was done under either of these acts. In any event, there was none of sufficient permanence to affect the navigation or other characteristics of the stream at the present time. References.—Acts, 1820.[19]

1819 “Enon Church. This church is situated in Lawrence county, ten miles east of Moulton. It was originally called Birdwell’s Spring Church. It was one of the constituent members of the association. It was organized in July, 1819, on nine members, whose names are as follows: Stephen Penn, Mary Penn, John Birdwell, Mary Birdwell, Ezekiel Thomas, Jenny Thomas, George Keys, Elizabeth Keys, and Sarah Simpson.”[20]

They left this church for a few years and helped organize Hopewell Church near Danville.

Page 169: “Hopewell Church, Morgan County. This church was received into the association in July 1825. It was constituted on the first Saturday in December, 1824. The presbytery was Elders Featherstone, Walden, Stephen Penn and John Birdwell. …We suppose it is the place where the church house now stands, about two and one-half miles east of Danville.”

SOME EARLY ALABAMA CHURCHES (ESTABLISHED BEFORE 1870) (1973) by Mabel Ponder Wilson, Dorothy Youngblood Woodyerd, Rosa Lee Busby, Daughters of the American Revolution Alabama Society, p. 95: “Organized in 1819, this church was first known as Birdwell’s Spring Church. The nine organizing members were Stephen Penn,…John and Mary Birdwell….”

Page 130: “Hopewell Baptist Church (located two and one-half miles east of Danville) Hopewell Baptist Church was constituted… l824, with the Presbytery composed of Elders Featherstone, Walden, Stephen Penn, and John Birdwell.”

LIFE AND LEGEND OF LAWRENCE COUNTY, ALABAMA’, by Dorothy Gentry (Tuscaloosa, 1962): “Enon, originally called Birdwell’s Spring Church, located ten miles east of Moulton was organized in July, 1819 on nine members, whose names were Stephen Penn, Mary Penn, John Birdwell, Mary Birdwell, Ezekiel Thomas, Jenny Thomas, George Keys, Elizabeth Keys and Sarah Simpson.”

1823 In October 1823, one William Birdwell (1766-1823), age 57, was executed at Moulton, Lawrence Co., AL. for the murder of Mr. Rhea. Thought to be the son of John Birdwell’s older brother Robert Birdwell (1751-1815) of Giles County, Tennessee. The two had had a dispute 10 years before.

1824 The Morgan Baptist Association: “One of the oldest churches in Morgan County, Hopewell was organized on the first Saturday in December 1824. It is mentioned in Hosea Holcombe’s 1840 A History of the Rise and Progress of the Baptists of Alabama. The presbytery was composed of Elders John Birdwell, Stephen Penn, Walden, and Featherstone. Charter members were Barkley Ballard, Polly Ballard, William Johnson, Sarah McDowell, Martha Rodgers, James Simmons, Stacy Simmons, Elizabeth Simmons, Polly Simmons, Solomon Simmons, Mary Simmons, Nicholas Gillentine Sr., Jane Gillentine, Richard L. Gillentine Jr., Martha Gillentine. Annie Gillentine, Gideon Spalden, and Nancy Spalden.” The first deacon was Nicholas Gillentine and the first clerk was William Johnson. The first recorded pastor was Henry W. Hodges in 1827. The church was located on land deeded to the church by William Johnson, “near the well of Brother Simmons” about two and one-half miles east of Danville, eight tenths of a mile south of what is now Highway 36, between Hartselle and Danville. The church was received into the Muscle Shoals Association in July, 1825.”

1828 Lexington (KY) REPORTER, July 23, 1828, p.1 contains a letter John Harris of Moulton, Lawrence Co, AL., to Andrew Jackson on the character of his late father John Harris, Justice of the Peace of Lawrence County. Column 1 cites “John Birdwell, Esq.” among those vouching for him. Column 5 is signed by John Birdwell, Allen Birdwell, and others.

John Birdwell received letter of dismission from Enon in 1842 when his wife Mary died and he moved to Texas. He was known to have visited Texas already by 1838 and probably made several other trips between Texas and Alabama.

Alabama Genealogical Society, Inc. magazine, Volume 21, Issue 1-2 (1958), (reissue? 1989) p. 24: “The First Meeting House. On Saturday, June 1, 1811, the church appointed the following committee ‘to view a place for a meeting house’: …John Birdwell and Joseph Powell.” p. 25: “…west bank of the Brier Fork of the Flint River, on a triangular piece of land about one acre in size. It was in the Northwest Quarter of Section 17, Township 2, Range 1 East of the prime meridian. This entire section (160) acres) was patented (or deeded) by the United States of America to John Birdwell and Joseph Powell…” p.26: “John Birdwell was the son of George Birdwell and Mary. John Birdwell was born in 1770 in Virginia. He married Mary Allen in Tennessee. Some of his children were born there. He moved to Mississippi Territory, Huntsville Meridian about 1805. According to the minutes of Huntsville First Baptist Church, his last Sunday as clerk was January 2, 1819. From there he moved to Lawrence County Alabama where he donated land and helped form the Birdwell Springs Baptist. About 1836 he moved to Fayette County, Alabama, then into Walker County, Alabama. Around 1845, after the death of his wife, he moved with his son, Col. Allen Birdwell, to Rusk County, Texas, where he died in March 1854. He has many descendants in Texas.”

FOOTPRINTS (Ft. Worth Genealogical Society, 1979), vol. 23-23, p. 107 says John Birdwell moved to Rusk Co, Texas in 1845.

His will is published in Alabama Genealogical Society Magazine (Birmingham, AL: 1985), Vol. 19, Issue 1. (Reissue 1989?)

Isbell Country: Genealogy of an Isbell Family by Odessa Morrow Isbell (2000), pp. 11, 19-20: “John Birdwell was in Alabama by 1805; settling north of Huntsville in 1805. He owned land in Sullivan Co., Tennessee and kept two homes so he could homestead Alabama property. He came to Texas in 1842-43 with son Col. Allen Birdwell. …”

1842 George W. Birdwell administered the estate of Robert Bell estate in 1842 in Rusk County, Texas (one book states incorrectly it was John Birdwell). Robert Bell (27 May 1797 TN-13 June 1842 Rusk Co, Tx) was former sheriff of Cherokee County, Alabama. His wife Belinda Scott (b.4 Jun 1795 TN d. 1842) also died in 1842 not long after her husband.

Some Mallorys and Bells (Greenville, Tx.: 1950) by James Robert Mallory, pp. 21-22: “Robert Bell…sent down to Cherokee County, Alabama, for John Birdwell, who was County Judge when Robert Bell was Sheriff.” (Correction: Robert Bell was sheriff of Cherokee County when John Birdwell’s nephew George, son of Joseph Birdwell, was county judge there.) Page 22: “The three families, Bell, Gray and Birdwell came out to Texas together, arriving in 1839. Bell’s headright joined that of Houston….” The author recites his grandfather’s descriptions of Sam Houston visiting the Bell home when he was a young boy. p.26: “John Birdwell, who had come to Texas with Robert and Belinda Bell and had been very close to the Bell family since their days in Alabama, was made Administrator of the Estate of Bell, at Bell’s dying request. Creditors immediately asked for an accounting and Birdwell auctioned off the farm and all the personal belongings of the family for benefit of the creditors.” p.27: “Birdwell, who had taken a headright and then bought up several more from disgruntled settlers, saw that it was impracticable for the Howeths to try to take care of all these children, so he ordered that the two boys, James, fifteen, and William, eleven, be bound out to Robert Gray, who had married Cynthia Scott, a sister of Belinda Scott Bell.”

1854 Birdwell family records show that John Birdwell died Feb. 16, 1854, at age 83 years, 4 months, 23 days, in the home of his son, Col. Allen Birdwell, and was buried in the family cemetery on the site. A fairly large number of the Birdwell family was buried in the cemetery, along with some related families and a number of slaves. After the farm had passed out of the Birdwell family, the later owners rather callously plowed the cemetery under. Trees marking some of the graves were cut down, while the gravestones were thrown into a ditch and covered. A partial list of those known to be buried there was supplied by Mrs. Bohannon of Mt. Enterprise, and a descendant of the Birdwell family, and printed. Some burials were recorded in the Birdwell family bible and appear in the book The Mitchells of Linn Flat by Gwenneth Mitchell, including the notation that John Birdwell’s grave is there.

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Texas, 1854-1857, by A.S. Ruthven, Grand Secretary and Past Grand Master, vol. II (1857), p.242: Mount Enterprise Lodge, No. 60. p.243: Past Masters. Master Masons. …Allen Birdwell, John Birdwell

The Mitchells of Linn Flat, by Gwenneth Aenone Marshall Mitchell (Austin, 1981), refers to the Birdwell Cemetery on pp. 174, 202, 214 and 215. Page 174: John Birdwell, his grandson John C. Birdwell, and John A. Birdwell Jr. were buried in a row, side by side, “at the Birdwell family burying ground on the Allen Birdwell place, not far from the family residence near Orton Creek,” three miles from Mt. Enterprise. On p. 202: “The cemetery has been abandoned for some years and pine trees grew over it. Some twenty years ago the ground was smoothed over and seeded in range grass.” From Gwenneth Aenone Marshall Mitchell (posted 10-29-1999 on Birdwell List, on Rootsweb.com): “Rusk Co., Texas History by the Rusk Co. Historical Society, 1982: page 112: John Birdwell, “old great-grandpap”, John C., his grandson, and John Birdwell (Old Uncle John) are all 3 buried in a row side by side. John C. in the middle, Grandpap on the southside, and Uncle John on the north side. Lucinda Ross Birdwell was most likely the first buried there.

1809 census shows 2 sons and 6 daughters born 1788-1809.

1820 The Federal Census record for Lawrence County, Alabama shows:

John Birdwell & wife over 21
3 sons under 21, 6 daughters under 21

1830 Federal Census for Lawrence County, Alabama shows:

John Birdwell & wife,
1 son (John),
2 daughters 15-19 (Lucinda & Ann),
1 dau 5-9 (Talitha).

1840 census shows all children gone from home.

The combined censuses of 1809, 1820 and 1830 show these children:

1 m b1788-1809 Moses 1796
1 m 1788-1809 Allen 1802
1 f Nancy 1795
2 f Eliz 1797
3 f Sarah 1799
4 f ?Mary Polly c1800-1804?
5 f Susan c1805-7
6 f Jane 1807
1 male 15-19 (1811-1815) John 1814
1 f 15-19 (1811-1815) Lucinda 1812
1 f 15-19 (1811-1815) Ann 1813
1 f 5-9 (1821-1825) Talitha 1821

Children of John Birdwell and Mary Allen:

1 Nancy Birdwell b Nov. 3, 1795 married James S. Romine
2 Moses Birdwell b 1796 married .1815 Sarah Duncan
3 Elizabeth Birdwell b Dec.31, 1797 (Jan. 1, 1800?) married 1813 James Isbell
4 Sarah H. Birdwell b Feb 14, 1799 married Levi Isbell
5 Allen B. Birdwell b Mar 22, 1802
6 ? Mary/Polly Birdwell c1800-5 (on some lists), (died young?)*
7 Jane Birdwell 1806- m. Samuel Neal (Jane Birdwell m. 10/27/1825 Samuel Neal (10/29/1825 recorded Lawrence Co. Marriage Book 1A, p.226; Gandrud, p.27); lived there 1830 w/ 1 son under 5. Lived in Panola Co., MS in 1850.
8 Susan Birdwell 1807- married Joel S Watkins
9 John Alexander Birdwell 1812-1871
10 Lucinda Birdwell 1809-1811 married James M. Vaught
11 Ann Birdwell Feb. 15, 1813-1868 married James B. Fowler
12 Son bc1816 (1810-20) on 1820 census, d 1820-30*
13 Talitha R. Birdwell June 18, 1821 married James Smyley Wright
  • It is possible that one of the married daughters and her husband (Romine or Isbell?) was living with them in the 1820 census and there was no son who died young. However, both James Romine and Levi Isbell were born well before 1800 and do not fit the 1810-20 age bracket.

Some lists of children online include these:

  • 1 Mary Birdwell 1800-1888 m1 John McCormack,2Josiah Phelps. This Mary was the daughter of John, son of Robert Birdwell
  • 2 George William Birdwell 1811-1831, some lists show him as another son, and some say died at Moulton, Lawrence Co., AL. (confusing him with Moses?), but he was not in the household in the 1830 census.
  • 3 Matilda Birdwell Jan 20, 1816-d 1895 Bristol, Ellis Co, Tx is on some lists as another daughter, but note that Talitha R. Birdwell’s name is incorrectly transcribed as Matilda by some researchers. The Matilda Birdwell of Bristol, Tx. was the daughter of John Birdwell of Giles Co., Tn.; granddaughter of Robert and Ellen (Sanford) Birdwell, Robert being the brother of John Birdwell who married Mary Allen. Matilda married in Giles CO., TN. 12 Dec 1834 Neal C. Dever (1802-1878).
  • 4 Judge Thomas Gaines Birdwell b1804 Giles Co, TN was not a son. He was a son of John Birdwell’s nephew John (son of Robert), and a brother of Mary and Matilda above. Interestingly, his son Thomas J. Birdwell’s daughter Pearl married John William Culver, son of Susannah (Culver) Isbell Culver, widow of Zach Isbell, son of Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway.
  • 5 William McElree Birdwell 1837-1906 was a grandson (son of John A.), rather than a son as some lists incorrectly show. [21]

1912 “For My Children: Memoir of Rev. George Preston Birdwell” (1912): “My grandfather, John Birdwell,…died at my father’s house near Mt. Enterprise, Texas, at the age of 84 years. He was never sick in his life, never had a chill nor a fever. There were nine boys in the family, and all died between the ages of 84 and 90. My father, Colonel Allen Birdwell, was born in West Tennessee…moved with his parents to North Alabama and settled about one mile from Raleville in Lawrence County…. In 1838 he came to Texas to look at the country. He was well pleased and in 1841, he moved to Texas. He settled first near Old North Church in Nacogdoches County. I think he made two crops there before he bought his home, three miles south of Mt. Enterprise, in Rusk County. This was all Nacogdoches County then, in Rusk County. This was all Nacogdoches County then….” [22]
Family links: Parents:

George Birdwell (1721 – 1780)
Mary Birdwell (1742 – 1811)

Spouse:

Mary Allen Birdwell (1780 – 1840)

Children:

Nancy Birdwell Romine (1795 – 1885)
Moses Birdwell (1796 – 1832)
Sarah H. Birdwell Isbell (1799 – 1876)
Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway (1800 – 1872)
Allen B. Birdwell (1802 – 1893)
Susan Birdwell Watkins (1809 – 1888)
Lucinda Birdwell Vaught (1811 – 1873)
John Alexander Birdwell (1812 – 1871)
Ann Birdwell Fowler (1813 – 1868)
Talitha R. Birdwell Wright (1821 – 1905)

Siblings:

Robert Birdwell (1745 – 1815)
George Birdwell (1760 – 1816)
Benjamin Birdwell (1765 – 1840)
Moses Birdwell (1769 – 1848)
John Birdwell (1770 – 1854)
William Birdwell (1772 – ____)

Sources

  1. Find A Grave Memorial# 50518424
  2. Find A Grave Memorial# 50518424
  3. Find A Grave Memorial# 50518424
  4. The Mitchells of Linn Flat by Gwenneth A.M. Mitchell, pp. 184, 201
  5. Col. Allen B. Birdwell Journal
  6. Jennifer Eckel, “BIRDWELL, ALLEN,” Handbook of Texas Online, accessed June 27, 2015. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association
  7. Special Collections, George Nixon Collection, Box GA122, Document 00189
  8. Rusk County Deed Book N-O (1860), p. 367
  9. FOOTPRINTS, vol. 23-24 (Ft. Worth: Fort Worth Genealogical Society, 1979), p. 107:
  10. Madison County, Alabama Deed Books A-E, 1810-1819, by Dorothy Scott Johnson (1976)
  11. Madison County, Alabama Deed Book E Page 133
  12. The First 200 Years of the First Baptist Church of Huntsville by Joseph M. Jones, p. 2
  13. The First 200 Years of the First Baptist Church of Huntsville by Joseph M. Jones, p. 2
  14. ‘A History of Early Settlement: Madison County Before Statehood, The Huntsville Historical Review (2008) by the Huntsville-Madison County Historical Society, p. 69
  15. A Dream Come True, The Story of Madison County and Incidentally of Alabama and the United States, Vol. 1, James Record. (Huntsville: Hicklin County, 1970), pp. 39-40.
  16. The Alabama Baptist Historian (1970), p.20
  17. History of Morgan County, Alabama by Knox, p. 54
  18. History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, published 1921 by Thomas McAdory Owen and Marie Bankhead Owen page 595
  19. Betts, Early history of Huntsville, by Betts, 1916, pp. 33, 70
  20. History of the Muscle Shoals Baptist Association by Rev. Josephus Shackelford, 1891, p. 165
  21. Find A Grave Memorial# 50518424
  22. Birdwell Family, East Texas Families, pp.233-34, 279-80

LEVI CASEY – A MOST DISTINGUISHED FORGOTTEN MAN

Biography

Levi Casey had many names bestowed upon him during his short lifetime. He was an Overmountain Man,[1] Militia Man, Captain, Colonel, Brigadier General, Congressman, Senator, son, brother, husband, and father; most importantly of all was the title Patriot.

Levi Casey was born in the year 1749 in the state of South Carolina according to records submitted and accepted into the D.A.R. files.[2] That would seem accurate considering he died in the first day of February 1807 in his 59th year which would put his birth year at 1749, unless he died on his birthday. He was born in what was then the old Ninety-Six District in which he had a hand in dividing into what would become Newberry County.[3]

In the Revolutionary War, brothers Benjamin, Randolph and Levi lent service as did their father, Abner Brooks Casey. Abner gave service and provided aide to the cause. Abner Brooks Casey was awarded a Bounty Land Grant in Kentucky for his effort.

The Casey brothers were in the Second Carolina Regiment under Col. Elijah Clark and fought in the Battle of King’s Mountain. Levi Casey became a (started out as a Captain) Lieutenant, then a Colonel of South Carolina Troops, and finally a Brigadier General, commanding the brigade consisting of the Laurens, and Newberry regiments. He commanded a company at the attack on Savannah and distinguished himself at Rocky Mount, King’s Mountain, Hanging Rock, Musgrove’s Mils, Fishing Creek, Blackstocks, and Cowpens.

After the fall of Charlestown, the British authorities considered South Carolina under British control, and some of the rebels even went to the British camp and sought protection. Levi and others would not entertain taking that action for one second. They were true blue and staunch patriots of the American cause and would willingly take any risk to secure Independence.

US Congressman. Elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Eighth and Ninth Congresses, he served from 1803 until his death. Casey was a South Carolina native but very little is known of his early life.

During the Revolutionary War he was commissioned a Captain in the Continental Army and fought with distinction at the Siege of Savannah (1779) and at the battles of Rocky Mount (1780), Hanging Rock (1780), and Cowpens (1781).

At the end of the conflict he was a Colonel in command of South Carolina’s Little River Regiment, and subsequently became a Brigadier General of the State Militia.

He was a five-term member of the State Senate (1781 and 1782, 1800 to 1802) and served nine terms in the State House of Representatives (1786 to 1788, 1792 to 1795, 1798 to 1799), prior to his election to the US House.

In 1802, he was elected as a Republican to serve in the U. S. House of Representatives within the 8th and 9th Congresses representing the state of South Carolina. There he served the 7th District that included Abbeville, Laurens and Newberry Districts. He served in that capacity from 4 March 1803 until his death 1 February 1807.

He was elected to the 10th Congress before the close of the 9th Congress, but died, likely in the state house, in Washington D. C. on the first day of February from a massive heart attack.

He was the first elected dignitary in our nation to die while in office (followed closely by another elected official who was buried in the Congressional Cemetery before Levi Casey was disinterred) and was initially buried at the St. Paul’s Presbyterian Cemetery [Rock Creek Cemetery] in Georgetown. Being the first experience in our young nation of someone dying while serving in office, there was no official burying ground for dignitaries at the time and that fact created a little bit of a conundrum. Efforts were quickly made to secure and dedicate a spot for just such dignitaries, and thus the Union Cemetery known as the Congressional Cemetery came to fruition.

Levi Casey was reelected to a third term but died before taking his seat in the Tenth Congress. Originally buried in a cemetery outside the Washington city limits, he was re-interred with honors at the Union (Congressional) Cemetery on 10 August 1832. [4]

It must have been good to have been one of Levi Casey’s constituents when he served them, his state, and his country. They were fortunate that a patriot and politician like him would share his and his colleagues’ progress and lack thereof for the young nation and its citizens. His wife, Elizabeth from the respected Duckett family of Maryland, had a lot of influence on his service as a political figure. The rule and custom of the Caseys was when he returned home from the “Federal City” he issued and sent out invitations ‘to all the people in his district (covered several counties), to assemble at his house on a day named, at which Gen. Casey would have a large barbecue and ample provisions for man and beast, and his friends were required to spend a week as his guests, during which time he would render to them a full account of his acts in Congress; and the balance of the time was spent in feasting and dancing and such other amusements as suited the tastes and inclinations of his guests

Parents:

Abner Brooks Casey (1700 – 1796)
Harriet Green Casey (1700 – 1786)

Spouse:

Elizabeth Duckett Casey (1759 – 1839)

Children:

John A Casey (1775 – 1862)
Sarah Siner Casey Rhodes (1789 – 1872
Levi Garrett “Old Flynn” Casey (1791 – 1855)
Elizabeth Casey Johnson (1795 – 1872)
Jacob Duckett Casey (1796 – 1853)
Samuel Otterson Casey (1801 – 1866)

Sibling:

Christopher Casey (1755 – 1840)
Randolph Casey
Benjamin Casey

Part of Levi Casey’s Service Record

Name: Levy Casey
Event Type: Military Service
Event Date: 1782
Event Place: United States
Event Place (Original):
Age:
Military Rank:
Birth Year (Estimated):
Death Date:
Affiliate Publication Number: M246
Affiliate Publication Title: Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783.
Affiliate Film Number: 1
GS Film Number: 000830280
Digital Folder Number: 007196920
Image Number: 00109[5]

1783: Commissioners Appointed to Divide Districts into Counties

Levi Casey changed the landscape of our country in more ways than one. In the article written in The Edgefield Advertiser, a South Carolina Newspaper, Levi Casey is mentioned. The text that mentions Casey reads as follows:

“It is recorded in Judge O’Neal’s Annals of Newberry County that in 1783 an ordinance was passed appointing Commissioners to divide the Districts of Charleston, Georgetown, Beaufort, Cheraw, Camden, Ninety-Six and Orangeburg into counties of convenient size. In Ninety-Six the Commissioners were “Andrew Pickens, Richard Anderson, Thomas Braddon, Levy Casey, Philemon, Waters and Arthur Simkins.”[6]

Rank of Colonel in the Revolutionary War

Name: Livy Casey
Event Type: Military Service
Event Date: 08 Jun 1782
Event Place: South Carolina, United States
Event Place (Original):
Age:
Military Rank: Colo
Birth Year (Estimated):
Death Date:
Affiliate Publication Number: M246
Affiliate Publication Title: Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783.
Affiliate Film Number: 89
GS Film Number: 000830368
Digital Folder Number: 004171622
Image Number: 00326[7]

1768 South Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index: 1790-1890

Name: Levi Casey
State: South Carolina
County: Newberry (Old 96 District)
Township: No Township Listled
Database: South Carolina Census Index[8]

1790 Federal Census Record

Levey Casey
United States Census, 1790
Name Levey Casey
Event Type Census
Event Date 1790
Event Place Newberry, South Carolina, United States
Page 53[9]

1800 Federal Census Record

Name: Levi Casy
Event Type: Census
Event Date: 1800
Event Place: Newberry District, South Carolina, United States
Page: 68
Affiliate Name: The U.S. National Archives and Records ::Administration (NARA)
Affiliate Publication Number: M32
Affiliate Film Number: 50
GS Film Number: 181425
Digital Folder Number: 004955934
Image Number: 00136[10]

Levi Casey Burial

Name: Levi Casey
Maiden Name:
Event Type: Burial
Event Date: 1807
Event Place: Washington, District of Columbia, District Of ::Columbia, United States of America
Photograph Included: Y
Birth Date:
Death Date: 03 Feb 1807
Affiliate Record Identifier: 6984077
Cemetery: Congressional Cemetery[11]

“Gen. Levi Casey, Representative in Congress from this State died at the City of Washington, on the 1st inst. The usual mourning and funeral honours were voted him.”[12]

There are researchers who list Brigadier General Levi Casey’s death date as 3 February 1807, but his death occurred on Sunday, the first day of February in the year 1807. His obituary was published in The National Intelligencer on Friday, the 6th day of February 1807 and states that Levi Casey died on Sunday. This man must have been larger than life, for he was the first, or one of the first that received the high honor of a state funeral. The text of his obituary follows:

Died, in this city, on Sunday morning at 4 o’clock, 1st instant of a pulindnick disease, Brigadier General Levi Casey, of South Carolina, in the fifty-ninth year of his age.

The fatal illness of this amiable gentleman was but of short duration; his closing moments were passed with that serenity which arises from the reflection of a well-spent life; his last breath was drawn with a calmness, resulting only from true fortitude and virtue.

Early in the revolutionary war, General Casey received the command of a company, with which, he gallantly assisted at the siege of Savannah, in the attempt made by the Americans and French to storm the British works. He was afterwards distinguished as a brave and prudent officer in the battles of Rockey Mount, Hanging rock, Musgoves, King’s mountains, Fishdamford, Blackstocks and at the Cowpens, where, he performed very important services to General Morgan. Through the whole war he enjoyed, as a brave and valuable officer, the applause, friendship and confidence of General Sumpter.

During many years after the close of that war, in which his conduct was so important and successful, he represented Newbury district in the state legislature, both in the Senate and House of Representatives, and was, at the time of his death, on the fourth term of service in Congress, a representative from South Carolina.

The friends and family of no man have more cause to lament a loss of this land, than those of General Casey; for in sweetness and equanimity of temper, he was equaled by few; in the tenderness of affection, of domesticities, surpassed by none.

He was from the commencement of the revolution, a uniform patriot; he has left behind him, the surest testimony of public confidence and private worth, the universal love of his neighbors. Painful as the regrets of his family must be, they will derive some consolation from the marked respect which was paid to his funeral by the national legislature. In this too, will the old revolutionary soldier participate; because, he will be in it, the memory of the brave is not forgotten.

The following is the order of procession as it moved from the capitol.

1. Marine Corps
2. Chaplains of Congress
3. Ministers
4. Physicians
5. Corpse
6. Pall bearers, (six Generals)
7. Mourners
8. Speaker preceded by the sergeant of arms, and followed by the Clerk
9. Members of the House of Representatives
10. President of the Senate preceded by the sergeant at arms, and followed by the Secretary
11. Members of the Senate
12. Heads of Departments and officers thereof
13. Citizens.

When the procession arrived at Rock Creek, it was formed on foot, (two and two) the carriages following behind, and proceeded in that manner to the grave.

The Speaker of the House of Representatives, the President of the Senate, and the Pall-bearers, with white scarves over the right shoulder and white gloves. The chaplains of Congress and other ministers with white scarves over the right shoulder and round the hat, and white gloves.

The sergeants at arms, clerk of the House, and Secretary of the Senate, with white scarves over the right shoulder only.

The members of the House of Representatives, with black crape on the left arm.[13]

Sources

[14]

  1. The Overmountain Men, Publisher: Overmountain Press; Second edition edition (January 1, 1986)
  2. D.A.R. Patriot Index, Volume 1, page 467 as LCol PS SC)
  3. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=C000226
  4. Charleston Courtier, periodical published Monday, February 16, 1907
  5. Citing this Record: “United States Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2DG-4DS4 : 21 December 2016), Levy Casey, 1782.
  6. The Edgefield Advertiser, a South Carolina newspaper, year not known, page 2
  7. Citing this Record: “United States Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2DG-W77L : 21 December 2016), Livy Casey, 1782.
  8. 1768 South Carolina, Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index: 1790-1890,
  9. Citing this Record “United States Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2DG-W7SD : 21 December 2016), Livy Casey, 1782.
  10. Citing this Record: “United States Census, 1800,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHRC-363 : accessed 14 June 2017), Levi Casy, Newberry District, South Carolina, United States; citing p. 68, NARA microfilm publication M32, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 50; FHL microfilm 181,425.
  11. Citing this Record: “Find A Grave Index,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QVV3-3F96 : 13 December 2015), Levi Casey, 1807; Burial, Washington, District of Columbia, District Of Columbia, United States of America, Congressional Cemetery; citing record ID 6984077, Find a Grave,http://www.findagrave.com.
  12. Charleston Courtier, periodical published Monday, February 16, 1907
  13. The National Intelligencer, February 6, 1807
  14. Research compiled and tribute written by a fourth great-granddaughter of the patriot Br. Gen. Levi Casey, Carolyn Murray Greer, completed on 15 June 2017

A journal of a life of memories…

has been written in parts by Beth Terry Murray. She has approved our posting some of them here. They will come in the parts as written. Enjoy.

My Daddy was killed in an accident…

For those of you that might be wondering what type of accident my daddy was killed in, then here is your answer. He had been using a drill earlier in the morning of October 3rd and it flew out of his hand because of a short in it. My daddy was used to being a jack of all trades so at lunch he went to the truck and “fixed” the drill. I can see him in my mind as I had watched him “fix” things many times. I’m sure he wiggled the cord, maybe even found a place where there was wire exposed and used electrical tape to fix it. My guess, not sure about that at all. Anyway, he wanted a color tv which were not cheap back in those days, so he was doing extra odd jobs for different people.

That afternoon he was under a ladies house in Leighton, lying on a piece of tin, which had water under it, whatever the job was he had finished and asked the lady to unplug the drill. As she was going into the house to unplug it, he reached for it, and was electrocuted. His death was instantaneous, and the palm of his hand had been burned where the electricity had entered. Later, probably years later, it occurred to me that this was a man that would not wear a wedding ring because too many electricians had been electrocuted that way. Yet on that day he was lying on a piece of tin, with water underneath, using a drill that had flown out of his hand earlier. Some might say “He had a bad day.”
I would have to say, “It was the day that had been appointed for God to take him home.” That day will come for all of us, I pray each of us will be ready.

A note to all of you that read these posts: they probably were not the most pleasant thing you have ever read, but I did not mean it to be that way. Daddy never felt sorry for himself, he always was very happy go lucky. He attempted to swim across the river one time and almost made it, before giving out. He was always cutting up with someone or pulling a prank on someone, he loved to laugh, and the only time he ever whipped me with a belt I think he cried more than I did. Anytime I was scared at night, I would run across the hall to my mother and daddy’s bed, my mother would tell me to go back to my room, but my daddy who was on the other side would call me over there, hold up the covers and let me lay down with my back to him. He would wrap his long arms around me and whisper in my ear that “everything was all right and he loved me”. He definitely was something special.

 


A Journal of a Life of Memories…

has been written in parts by Beth Terry Murray. She has approved our posting some of them here. They will come in the parts as written. Enjoy.

One Man’s Life

This post is about my Daddy’s life. He was born on April 6, 1925 to Thomas Benton Terry and Lula Elizabeth Mayes Terry, he was named Wilburn Drew Terry and was the baby of the family. When he was 6 years old his mother ran off to Texas with another man and left him and his 6 siblings with their daddy. They lived in Courtland near, what would later become the airbase. His daddy was a dirt farmer and could not take care of all the children, so my daddy roamed from house to house with what little clothes he had and he stayed with the different families until they told him he would have to move on because there was not enough food. As I recall he would stay with 6 different families: 1. Hoover Reding’s family, 2. Hollis Green’s family, 3. Fuzzy Terry’s family, I know the other 3, but I am drawing a blank at this time.

His mother came home periodically, mainly after the cotton had been picked and my grandfather had money. Why he would give it to her I have no idea, maybe she made promises she didn’t keep, I don’t know. She bought my daddy a pair of red cowboy boot’s one time and promised him he could go back to Texas with her, he just needed to run get his clothes together, which he did. When he got back to the bus stop she was at the back of the bus waving goodbye to him. (this story he told me himself and yet, he had no bitterness about it) When he got older he went to live with his sister Gladys and her husband in Gadsden. He even attended Emma Samson school for a while, but never graduated from any school. He joined the army and got his GED while there.

Helen and Hoover Reding were dating, and decided to introduce my mother to daddy. She was putting up a Christmas tree and I suppose it was love at first sight according to the stories she always told me. They dated for a while and he asked her daddy if he could marry her and of course, Papa Jenkins consented. However, after daddy had asked her and gone home, Papa called mother into the living room and asked her if she knew who Daddy’s mother was? She said yes, but she was not marrying his mother. My mother was also the baby of a family of 10 children and she and Helen had a job in Decatur and would ride a bus everyday to work.

My mother and daddy were married in a double wedding with Hollis and Amelia Green, at the Methodist Church in Town Creek.
So if you ever see where Susan Green Williams calls me her sister on Facebook this is the reason, our parents got married together and ran around together. I’m thinking the year they married was 1948, but I may be wrong. They lived in Courtland for several years before moving to Town Creek. Thomas Richard Terry (Ricky) was born on April 23, 1954 and a precious daughter Martha Elizabeth Terry (Beth) was born on September 5, 1956.
Life was good, laughter was plentiful, and soon a plan began to form for them to build a house on land mother inherited from her parents.

To be continued……….

 


Isbells and historical homes….

Photo of the Taylor-Roberts-Isbell home

In an article on al.com from 2013, another Isbell home was featured. This was the Roberts-Taylor-Isbell home. The article is reprinted below:

 

Roberts-Taylor-Isbell House ‘just full of history’

The 1854 Roberts-Taylor-Isbell House, the lovely, Greek Revival townhouse on Government Street

Photo of the Taylor-Roberts-Isbell home

Historic home restored to its original state.

near the Broad Street intersection, is one of the main attractions on the Mobile Historic Homes Tour this weekend, and it’s worth the price of admission all by itself. “It’s just full of history,” Roy Isbell said.

The Isbells, who have done a great deal of the work on the house themselves, see their project as a preservation rather than a restoration. The house caught fire in 2009, but wasn’t badly damaged. “The fire is such a small part of the house’s history,” Debbie Isbell said.

Visitors will notice different wallpaper styles in every room, which was very much in style at the time it was decorated. “Every inch of the house was covered in paper,” Roy Isbell said.

To reproduce the original wallpaper in the foyer, Roy and Ray commissioned a stencil, which was copied from the 1890s wallpaper they found under the staircase, then did the walls by hand. The trompe-l’oeil border is also a reproduction from the 1850s.

“It’s not that they couldn’t afford crown molding,” Ray Isbell explained. “Paper was ‘in.’”

When the Isbells bought the house in 1994, it was filled with furniture and memorabilia from the three related families who had occupied it since it was built. The Roberts and Taylors loved to collect things, and the Isbells have set out many treasures for tourgoers to enjoy, from 1930s Shakespeare Club pamphlets in the parlor to the 1875 china in the dining room.

The Isbells have also written a history of the home for the docents to narrate during the tour. A few highlights: Joel Abbot Roberts, a local banker, built the main house in 1854, but the first house on the lot was built circa 1837 by Joel’s father, Dr. Willis Roberts of Georgia. Joel Abbot Roberts’ ledger, on display in the front parlor, shows that he paid $24 for the parlor pocket doors.

Mirabeau Lamar, president of the Republic of Texas from 1838-41, was a family friend who visited often; his portrait hangs just outside the dining room, and the Isbells have a copy of a poem he wrote in tribute to Joel Roberts’ wife, Mary, called “Flowers from the Heart.”

Four generations of the Roberts family lived here until 1897, when the home was acquired by R.V. Taylor; in turn, four generations of Taylors occupied it until 1988. The west wing was R.V. Taylor’s home office at the turn of the century when he was the mayor of Mobile. His only daughter, Helen Buck Taylor, married Captain J. Lloyd Abbot III, who counted among his ancestors Gen. Edmund Pendleton Gaines – for whom Dauphin Island’s Fort Gaines is named.

But that’s just the tip of the iceberg of what guests on the home tour will learn about Mobile history and the Isbell House’s place in it. If you’re from Mobile, you may even discover some anecdotes about some of your relatives. The Roberts, Taylors and Isbells had quite a few cousins, including Herndons, Toulmins, Langdons, Pillans, Inges, Wallers and more.

“This house was never the grandest in Mobile,” Ray Isbell said. “But at the same time, it has so many original features to it.”

The Taylors had been quite wealthy, but were wiped out in the 1929 stock market crash, he said, and after that, couldn’t afford to do much in the way of renovations. “The true value of the house is that so little of it was changed,” he said.


SAD. Sad. Sad.

No words can express the sadness on the loss of little ones.

Blytheville Courier Isbell home fire 1951

 


HOME is spelled f-a-m-i-l-y

From long ago now and far away, there are memories that are cherished. Home. Family. Gran. Aunts and uncles and first cousins. Family like my children have never gotten to be a part of, extended family. It made you feel safe, secure, loved. You learned what was important even when you did not know that you were being instilled with values and wit and humor. My ancestors James Richardson Isbell and Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell lived in that

little community of Paint Rock while other kin lived in Larkinsville and other surrounding towns and communities. In Jackson County during those days Isbell was a fairy common name. There was John Isbell, James Isbell, Allen Isbell, Levi Isbell. There were Birdwells, too. John Birdwell, Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell’s father,  with all his family were in Jackson County before statehood as well. There were the Houk and the Peters families, and the

susan-anna-isbell-murray

Susan Anna Isbell Murray

Murray lines. Rev Simeon Houk whose wife was Tobitha Murray Houk married William Deaton Jackson Murray and Susan Anna Isbell Murray in the year 1848 in Jackson County.

 

My Birdwell/Isbell line settled in Jackson County, Alabama after they had brought their family into the Mississippi Territory a good fourteen years before statehood. And then moved to Franklin, now Colbert County, Alabama. But first were the towns of Paint Rock and Woodville, Trenton, Pleasant Grove, and the communities of Aspel and LimRock and all the surrounding little towns and communities.

When I read the account of one man named Hodges recount in a speech in 1993 his experience and delight in being born and raised in the little community of LimRock and Aspel. His title is Judge Bob Hodges and his story sounds so much like one that my Gran may have told. It made me feel at home, safe, and longing for the good old days, the simple days, the days of extended family. The content of his speech follows:

AN ADDRESS AT LIM ROCK ‐ ASPEL HERITAGE DAY on October 9 , 1993 by Jackson County Circuit Judge Bob Hodges

Before you take anything else I say seriously, I want to read to you my father’s business card he used at Hodges Drug Store for over 30 years: “Robert Leslie Levi Buchannon Fairbanks Hodges, Jr……. Born on land lying N W One-fourth o f S E One ‐ fourth of Sec 10, Township 4 , Range 7E, Berry’s Cove, North Lim Rock, Alabama…… Now located in trading business about, 1 2 miles N E born site…….Come’n see me…. T

elelphone: Day: 2 longs and 1 short Nite: 2 longs and a half….” As you can see, he never forgot where he came from, and he was one of the best representatives o f the Lim Rock Chamber of Commerce who ever served. My roots go back here a t least three generations before me, and my memories of this community go back to the years of my childhood just before World War II. I want to share some of them with you today, because the heritage of a place, to me, means what culture that place has left us ‐ that unique and special quality a community has that is measured not just by its physical boundaries and its geographical features, but by its people: Who they were, what they believed in, and what they raised their children to be. And so, as I began thinking about what to say today, I considered In any memories of this community and its people, and ‘the special place it has occupied in my heart and in my family.

It began, for me, over 60 years ago, when three brothers left the cotton fields here on a sharecropper farm and moved ten miles up the road to the big city of Scottsboro. Each of them, my Dad, my Uncle Mess, and my Uncle Charles, never missed a chance t o remind travelers who stopped at Hodges Drug Store ‘that Lim Rock and Aspel were not just places you passed by on your way from Woodville to Scottsboro ‐ Lim Rock and Aspel, to them, was an oasis where you could come from Huntsville or Scottsboro or wherever else and quench your thirst for plain and simple beauty and good solid. working people who loved a good laugh and a rocker on the porch in the evening after a plate of pinto beans and corn bread and turnip greens, and the sound of the animals in the barn at night. The stuff a farm boy never finds, no matter how long he has been gone from the farm and no matter how far removed he has become in his dress and his income, from that simple beginning. The stuff he always longs to return to, and he can only find in a place he called home.

From my great ‐ grandfather George Johnson Hodges, known to the folks in this community only as Crockett,  or my Grandfather Bob, for whom I was named, to my father, I learned legends of the people who lived here. They were told over and over to me and to others in my hearing so many times that they have become the stuff of this community. Whether they ever really happened or not is now not important to me when I think of them and of this community ‐ What i s important is the humor and the dignity of those who were portrayed in the stories I heard and the respect of the storytellers for them and for this community.

M y memories begin with evenings spent with. my grandfather here as a very small child on the porch of a two ‐ story log house which sat just over yonder around the curve from the Methodist Church. And I remember the smell in the springtime in those evenings of freshly turned earth, and of his eagerness over the crop he thought he could coax out of it, and of our watching and waiting for the sound of the Joe Wheeler to come churning through the night, its whistle blowing for the people of Lim Rock.

I remember Clyde Gentle’s store, where my father had his first job as a boy clerking and keeping up with the eggs and chickens on the rolling store, and the smell of pine wood floors and kerosene, and the sight of mule harnesses hanging from pegs, and glass jars of candy, while we waited for the Joe Wheeler to return me to Scottsboro after a weekend. Even as a child, there was a sadness on leaving, a sense that the old man in the overalls who was waving bye to me as the train pulled out from Clyde Gentles’ store, and so many others like him in this community were somehow special parts of my beginning that I wanted to come back to and hold on to until I understood the peace and the simple virtues of this place.

I remember cotton fields and hoes and long pick sacks and  the hot day in the field when my grandfather and Charlie Stewart watched me drink in gulps from a cool thermos jug and then cackled and told me it was a chamber pot they kept under the wagon for themselves.

Some  of the past citizens of this community, many of them now dead and gone, have become legends in my mind, because of the stories I was told about them. The athletes in Lim Rock took on superhuman proportions for me. Dr. Rayford Hodges swore to me in the drug store as he was sipping his coffee, time and again, that Rabbit Gray, the catcher for Lim Rock’s baseball team, played barefooted and once caught a foul ball that traveled 200 feet and never got higher than his head. M y father swore to me that Shine Lusk kicked a 50 yard field goal barefooted for Lim Rock’s football team, against the wind, in the closing seconds of a big game against Aspel.

The people of this community were always church ‐ going people on Sundays. My father’s earliest memories were of being carried in a wagon by my Grandmother to the Primitive Baptist Church. He remembered it well, because when they got to my Grandfather with the footwashing, he always let out a cackle when they got to the foot with the stub of a little toe he had cut off when cutting railroad ties.

The people of this community“ have always stood out for me as being folks with a never ‐ give ‐ u p attitude. Through the droughts, the flooding rains, the bitter winters, the poverty of the depression, the great tornado that swept through Paint Rock and here, the infant flu deaths that struck family after family ‐ through all those times when it seemed that a mother and father and children could not possibly hold up for another day ‐ your ancestors and mine ‐ and some of you who are older and here today ‐ squared up your shoulders and spit on your hands and went back to work and endured. I think that never ‑ give ‐ u p attitude is best remembered by  me in  a little story by Bob Hodges my grandfather told me that happened back in the late twenties.

My Uncle Mess, an older and larger boy than my father by far, had my father down, pinned flat to the ground, pummeling him at will, when my grandfather discovered them on his way back from milking. “What’s going on here?”, he asked. Immediately, my father, who was flat on his back and taking a mighty whipping, said: “Papa, you better get him off of me or I’m gonna kill him.”

The generations of the people of Lim Rock and Aspel before us were hard ‐ working, church ‐ going, mostly quiet ‐ spoken people, it seems from my memory and from stories I heard. But in all that toil and adversity they faced as farmers and farmers’ children, there beat within many of them the pulse of a sense of humor that no other community surpassed.

My father never got past the little nine ‐ grade school house that used to sit down the road over yonder, and he always envied his older brother, Charles, for being so bright and for getting a college education. There came a day when my father’s old school teacher came in the drug store to get a prescription filled and my father” waited on her. He was working there as a teenager then, and he had some conversation with the lady, and then called all of us employees over t  meet her.

We gathered around, and he said, “Now, Miss Birdie, tell all these people what you just told me.” She looked at u s and said: “He was the brightest student I ever had. He made all A’s and h e could work any problem I ever gave him. He was a brilliant student.”  My father swelled up and beamed at all of us, and the little old lady made her way to the store going out, and she turned, looked back at my father, and said: “CHARLES (not R.L.), it sure was nice to see you again.”

My grandfather and my father had the same name, except for the junior and senior that separated them. One day a juror summons came to the drug store delivered by the sheriff and made out to just R . L . Hodges. My father made a call to the courthouse and discovered that, by the birthdate, it was intended for my father. He called my grandfather to the store and told him he had a jury summons delivered there for him.

M y grandfather took the subpoena, never said a word, went to the courthouse the next week, and served on the jury. Many months went by, with never another word being said. Then, just before Christmas, Mr. Brad Stewart, a long ‐ time friend and customer of m y father’s, delivered a nice big country ham to m y father as a gift, wrapped in brown paper and labeled “R.L.Hodges.” My father put it on a table at the back of the store until he could take it home at quitting time. In comes my grandfather, walks straight to the back room, picks up the ham, and starts out the drug store. “Papa” screamed my father. “Papa ‐ that’s m  ham!” “Son,” my grandfather said, “If that was my name on that jury summons, that is my name on this ham.” And off he went.

Lim Rock and Aspel people have always been known as good neighbors. My grandfather Bob Hodges’ neighbor was Charlie Stewart, who lived on the next farm down the road toward the school house. One cold January day, when the snow was on the ground and more predicted, a Saturday, my grandfather told Charlie that h e was taking his wife and children down to Paint Rock Valley to sit with a sick relative for the night, would be gone the whole weekend, and would Charlie milk the cow and feed the mule the next day. Charlie readily agreed to help out.

The next morning, more snow having fallen during the night, and bitter cold, Charlie came trudging up in the darkness, milked the cow, set the pail on the back porch, fed the mule, and on his way out through the snow, just as he passed my grandfather’s bedroom window, my grandfather threw up the shade and the window, and said, “Much obliged, Charlie.” You don’t find good neighbors like that any more.

There are many, many other stories I could tell which reflect the solid kind of people who founded this community and those who came after them. It says something about what we revere in this community and its people that those of us who have ties here come back and back again and are here today to celebrate it.

Someone once wrote that you can never really go home again, but I think we can, time and again, in our memories. Less than thirty days before my father died, just before Christmas of 1983, we took our last ride together. He was s o frail I had to help him in the car, and he was so weak he could hardly talk above a whisper. “We’ll  o anywhere you want,” I said as I backed the car out of his driveway. “I’ll show you,” he said, and he just from then on, pointed his finger where he wanted me to turn.

W e came here, and w e rode through Aspel and by Jenny’s Chapel and past Gentry Hastings’ house and down to Pinky’s Store to say hello and then by the old Clyde Gentle store where he first worked as a boy. And then on we went, by the fields where there used to be cotton and by the piece of ground where the barn and log house once stood, and around the curve where the old schoolhouse once stood, and then out into Berrys Cove where he was born, until. he became too tired to continue. He wasn’t talking during the ride, but both of us were thinking of these communities and his childhood and all the years that had brought him full circle back to here. You see, he never ever forgot that this was home. And you never ever forgot to take him in. That is why I am here today, and that is why I thank you for letting me be a part of it.

The phone number has changed for us – It’s no longer ” 2 longs and 1 short”, but our “trading business“, as he said on his card, is still about 1 2 miles

susan-anna-isbell-murray

Susan Anna Isbell Murray

northeast of Berrys Cove, and, for our family, this is still home.

THE END

Robert L . (Bob) Hodges practiced law before being elected Circuit Judge of Jackson County, Alabama. He is a highly esteemed judiciary by profession, much sought after as a speaker, and without equal as a storyteller and writer. Bob is the son of the late      R . L and Zelma (Nichols) Hodges, Jr. who set an impeccable example before him.


Felix Grundy was a very popular given name for many…

here is a short biography of Felix Grundy Norman, Sr., 1808-1885

F & AM Square and CompassFELIX GRUNDY NORMAN, lawyer, was born January 4, 1808, near Smyrna, Rutherford County, Tenn. and died August 5, 1885 at Tuscumbia [Alabama]; son of John and Margaret [Stockird] Norman who lived at Smyrna. He was denied early educational advantages, but was taught in the rudiments by an older brother. He began life as a merchant but later taught school for several years. He studied under William Casper, was admitted to the bar in Tuscumbia in the early thirties, and practiced at that point and the surrounding country until his death. He was mayor of Tuscumbia for many years, and represented his county in the legislature for sessions of 1841, 1842, 1844, 1845 and 1847-8, inclusive. Although he supported the Confederacy with his means and influence, he was debarred from active participation on account of his age. He was a Democrat; a Presbyterian; and a Mason. Married: August 17, 1848 at Dickson, to Jane Lavina, daughter of Henry and Jane [Shelton] Cook of Spotsylvania County, Va., residents for some years of Huntsville, later locating in Tuscumbia where they spent the remaining years of their lives, the former for some time government agent for the disposition of Indian lands. Children: 1. John Henry; 2. Felix Grundy, m. Della Phares, Salinas, Calif.; 3. Mary Barton, m. John R. Charlton, La Verge, Tenn.; 4. Kate Cook, m. Hall S. Kirkpatrick; 5. Thomas Edgar, m. Lee Ellis, Memphis; 6. James Beverly, last residence: Tuscumbia.

Bibliography
Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Vol. IV. by Thomas McAdory Owen, Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1921.

 

Felix Grundy Norman, Sr.

Biography of Felix Grundy Norman, Sr., 1808-1885

FELIX G. NORMAN, of Franklin [County Alabama], was born and educated in Tennessee. He represented Franklin for the first time at the session of 1841, and by continuous elections, he served in the House until the close of the session of 1847-8, since which time he has been in private life, engaged in the practice of law. While in the Legislature, Col. Norman was a very efficient member, both in debate and in Committees. He was a Democrat from honest conviction, and never departed from that faith, but always kept himself in the path of duty according to the best of his judgment. Acting on principle, he opposed at every step the resolutions of the General Assembly accepting Alabama’s portion of the proceeds of the public lands. In the same manner, he opposed what he considered the improper identity in the same resolution, on the Constitutional amendment providing for biennial sessions of the Legislature, and for the removal of the Seat of Government at the session of 1845. In all this, he only yielded to a sense of duty, to prevent injustice, or an unsafe precedent. However laudable his purpose, he course on the question of removal resulted to his injury, through influences subsequently brought to bear against him, in a political sense.
For many years, Col. Norman was Grand High Priest and Grand Master of the Masonic fraternity of Alabama, who presented him, on his retirement, appropriate medals, commemorating his services to the craft.
From his bearing in the Legislature, the courtesy he always exhibited in debate, the intelligence with which he handled questions, and the ease and graceful elocution which seemed natural to him, Col. Norman was unquestionably cast in a large intellectual mould, capable of expansion beyond the limits within which it was his fortune to be confined as a political aspirant. Although rigid in the tenets of his party, and at times somewhat acrimonious under provocation, he was not blind to the merits of a measure because it may have originated with his opponents. He was bold and fearless, often displaying the gallantry of ancient knighthood in the legislative arena, shivering a lance with friend or foe without personal malice. His face was luminous with good feeling, and his whole deportment was that of a gentleman sensible of the rights of others, and careful of his own, in all that relates to the substantial etiquette of life. Had his lot permitted a more congenial opening for the development of his character after the inward model, there is no doubt that Col. Norman would have filled a large space before the public, and achieved a reputation as proudly National as that which he now enjoys is, in local view, distinguished for ability and honor. Perhaps the greatest obstacle to his advancement to higher places has been a certain measure of self-respect and honorable sensibility, which made intrigue and management the usual medium of success repugnant to his nature. He has abundant reason, however to be satisfied with the result, in his own high and unimpeachable character. He is still in the meridian of life, and he resides in Tuscumbia.

Bibliography
Source: Reminiscences of Public Men in Alabama, by William Garrett, Atlanta, GA: Plantation Publishing Press, 1872.

Feather Pen

Masonic Plaque. Washington Lodge No. 36. Tuscumbia, Alabama. Felix G. Norman, Worshipful Master. William Harvey, Senior Warden. Lewis G. Garrett, Junior Warden. July 3 1847. A. L. 5847. American Independence 71. Felix Grundy Norman. Most Worshipful Grand Master

 

Bibliography Source: Two Hundred Years at Muscle Shoals, by Nina Leftwich, Tuscumbia, Alabama, 1935: When the cornerstone of the new 1847 Tuscumbia Masonic building was put down, a engraved cooper plaque was placed inside the stone. Text of plaque in graphic above.

The Norman home in Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama:

Norman home in Tuscumbia, Alabama

The Norman house is an historic residence in Tuscumbia, Alabbama. The house was built in 1851 by Felix Grundy Norman, a lawyer who also served as mayor of Tuscumbia and in the Alabama Legislature from 1841to 1845 and again in 1847–48. Norman’s father-in-law was the land agent for the sale of the Chickasaw and his brother-in-law, Armistead Barton, built Barton Hall in nearby Cherokee, Alabama.

The house sits on the corner of Main and Second Street, and has two identical facades facing each street. Each face has a central pedimented portico supported by four tuscan columns. Each portico is flanked by three part windows consisting a nine-over-nine sash window which is bordered by narrow three-over-three sashes. The interior retains its Greek Revival woodwork and mantels.

Feather Pen

JOHN NORMAN, brother of Felix Grundy Norman,  was born in Rutherford County December 5, 1804, son of John and Mary Margaret (Stockard) Norman. Extent of schooling not determined. Married in Rutherford County Tennessee September 13, 1867, to Nancy Neal; children-Cynthia Jane, Margaret Rebecca, Mary A., Harriett E., Martha E., John B., Josephine B., and Sarah F. Norman. Removed to Carroll County Tennessee, c.1828, to engage in farming and clearing landholdings in 8th civil district. Appointed a trustee of Huntingdon Academy, Carroll County, in 1845 but resigned in 1848. Elected constable, 1832; sheriff, 1838-44; clerk of circuit court, 1854-56; county judge, 1856; one of committee to plan for repair of courthouse and building jail. Served in the Tennessee House, 33rd and 34th (Reconstruction) General Assemblies, 1859-61; 1865-67; representing Carroll County; served in the Tennessee Senate, 35th General Assembly, 1867-69; representing Carroll, Dyer, and Gibson counties; member Opposition Party in 33rd Assembly; Unionist in 34th and 35th. Mason; member of Zion Presbyterian Church. Died in Madison County October 5, 1874.

Bibliography
Sources: Prepared Roster, House, 33rd General Assembly; Goodspeed, History of Carroll County, 802, 803; Rutherford County records: “Marriage Records, Vol. 1, 1804-37,” p. 155; “Wills, Settlements and Inventories, Vol. 6, 1824-27,” pp. 194-95; Carroll County records: “Minutes, County Court, 1826-33, Pt. 2,” p. 532; “1838-42, Book 3, Pt. 2,” p. 223, 390; “1843-50, Pt. I,” p. 144, “Pt. 2,” p. 390; “1850-55,” pp. 25, 30; “1855-59,” pp. 59, 213-214; ‘Marriages, 1838-60,’ pp. 235, 274, 412; Jackson Whig and Tribune, October 31, 1874; infomation supplied by greatgrandaughters, Mrs. Julian Devault and Mrs. Allen Holliday, McKenzie.