The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Florence

Generals friends of Generals…

in the Revolutionary War and forward…hmmm now how could that impact a family heritage?

Colonel and then Lieutenant Levi Casey and likely his brothers and father fought alongside of some of the most famous generals in history. General Francis Marion “The Swamp Fox” and General Thomas Sumter to name two. General Thomas Sumter and Levi Casey were close friends.

South Carolina Generals

Francis Marion (1732 – 1795) was born in Berkeley County, S.C. A planter, he had fought against the Cherokees in 1759 and 1761, and when the American Revolution began, he volunteered and led “irregulars” in several engagements; because his sprained ankle had led him to leave Charleston, S.C., before its surrender to the British, he was available to command the remaining resistance in South Carolina after the colonials’ loss at Camden, S.C. Known as the “Swamp Fox” because the British Col. Tarleton called him “this damned old fox” and because he operated out of a secret hideout on a river island, he used guerrilla tactics to strike at stronger British and Loyalist forces, disrupting enemy communications, capturing supplies, and freeing prisoners before disappearing into the wilderness. From 1781 on he led his troops under Gen. Nathaniel Greene. After the war, he served in the South Carolina senate and commanded Fort Johnson in Charleston harbor (1784–90).

William Washington was born on February 28, 1752 in Stafford County, Virginia. His parents intended him to join the ministry and sent him to study with a theologian. However, in early 1776 he accepted a captain’s commission in the Continental Army commanded by his cousin, George Washington, and then fought at Long Island, Trenton (where he was wounded), and Princeton. In 1780, he transferred to the Army’s Southern Division and fought in a series of skirmishes around Charleston. The following year, he led his cavalry to victory in close combat with British regulars at Cowpens. His success there, in particular his hand-to-hand saber battle with the British commander Tarleton, earned Washington a Congressional medal. He then joined the American forces in North Carolina for battles at Guilford Courthouse, Hobkirks Hill, and Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded and captured. He remained a paroled prisoner-of-war in Charleston until the city’s evacuation by the British at the end of 1782. After the war, Washington stayed in Charleston, where he served in the state legislature. He later refused a gubernatorial nomination, but in 1798 returned to public service as a brigadier general for service in America’s undeclared naval war with France. Washington died on March 6, 1810.

Thomas Sumter (1734 – 1832) was born in Hanover County, Va. Raised on the frontier, a veteran of the French and Indian War, he settled in South Carolina in 1765. During the American Revolution he led a partisan campaign against the British in the Carolinas and the success of his small force gained him the nickname, “Gamecock of the Revolution” (and led to his name being given to the island-fort off Charleston where the Civil War began). After the war, Sumter sat in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate.

Andrew Pickens, 1739 — 1817 was born near Paxtang, Pa. The son of Irish immigrants, he settled in South Carolina in 1763. In the American Revolution, he helped defeat the Loyalist forces at Kettle Creek, Ga., contributed to the decisive victory at Cowpens, S.C. (1781), and commanded the forces that captured Augusta, Ga.


Here is an excellent example of why our children need to…

be taught cursive writing in school. Lt Levi Casey issuing orders to troops during the Revolutionary War. This document is the actual handwriting and signature of Lt Levi Casey issuing an order to his soldiers during the Revolutionary War. It is dated 7 Aug 1782. Levi Casey rose in rank from Colonel to Lieutenant to Brigadier General during his tenure in the Revolutionary War. He was one of the reknown OverMountain men as was David Crockett.

Br General Levi Casey served terms as a House of Representative and then had been re-elected Senator but did not get to serve his last elected term because he had a massive heart attack and died Feb 1807. He was first interred at Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, DC and in circa 1832 he was re-interred in the Congressional Cemetery.

His widow, along with her Duckett nephew came to Alabama before 1820 and settled in Lauderdale County, Alabama in the community of Rawhide. She, some of her children, and other relatives are buried in the Casey Family Cemetery on what used to be her property.

Transcription:
D____
I desire you will draft or other ways order one third of your company to hold themselves in readiness to march by the fifteenth of this instant to the Cherikees you are to provide flower/flour for sixty days provisions for each man and two good beef cattle and as pack horses a[re] not to be had would recommend that each man take horse and that one half carry forward and the other half act as horsemen and change as they can agree or be ordered and any that have not any horses of their own you are to impress in the bounds of your own company you are to collect all the swords you can and put them into the hands of the men.

August [symbols] 7th 1782                                                                                                                Cap [symbols] Saxon

I am ____and hum [symbols]
(take this to mean your humble servant)
Lt Levi Casey

Official Orders 7 Aug 1782

Official Orders 7 Aug 1782


Ever wonder what others from family lines looked like?

The following is a pdf file with an article from the White River Valley Historical Quartlery in the issued dated Spring 1964. It traces our Abner Casey’s lineage from the Tyrone County, Ireland to Taney County, Missouri. Some photos are included of those lines. Enjoy. Click on the hyperlink below to access the article.

Caseys from Tyrone County Ireland to Taney County Missouri article from White River Valley Histroical qtrly


J T Flagg Knitting Mill…

was a place where lots of Shoals area people were employed at one time. The following photograph shows the workers. The date of the photograph is not known, or the name of the workers. Any help in making identification would be appreciated.

photo of workers at J T Flagg Knitting Mill in Florence Alabama in an undated photo


Weeden Heights School…

in an old photo.

old photo of Weeden Heights School in Florence AL


A 1937 photo of a beautiful Shoals lady…

can you be the first one to identify her?

This is a 1937 photo from the Junior Class at Florence State Teacher’s College annual. It was the first annual for Florence State.

Linnie Beckman 1937


I never knew there was a Jefferson Hotel in Florence…

but here it is in the photo of Court Street made back in 1913. That was the most beautiful courthouse. They took it down in the 1960s, iirc.

Photo of Court Street in Florence AL showing the old courthouse and the Jefferson Hotel


Strange that…

two  young women from two different lines of a family could be classmates at college in 1913.

Miss Eulalia Kerby and Miss  Sarah LUTIE Murray were both in the Freshman class at State Normal College in Florence in 1913.

Here is part of the list of freshmen for that class:

Photo of freshman class in year 1913

There is a list of students in the Freshman class of 1913 at State Normal School and this photo. There were no names attached to identify what names match which person.

List of some of the freshman class 1913

Small world.


Sometimes you find family history in unexpected places…

and this is one case.  The photograph below represents the third grade class at Brandon School in 1911. Miss Coplan was the teacher. The students in the photograph are named as follows:

First row:Hamer Gamble, Theo Wilks, Oscar Hardiman, Paul Trammel, John Smith,
Clyde Cole, Paul Faulkner

Second row: Daisy Kirby, Teresa Johnson, Ethel Kirby,
Gertrude Trammel, Mae Rickard, Alma Nichols, Gertrude Cole, Audrey McKinnley,
Ethel Ray, Elsie Ray, Colina Bevis

Third row: Alvin Landrum, Charlie Freeman, unknown, Ray Harris, Hoarse Kirby, Ann Laura Hale, Miss Coplan, Maud Tucker, Leslie Patterson, unknown, Susie Adams

Three of the Kerby children are shown in this photo: Daisy Kerby, Ethel Kerby and Horace Kerby, but of course the names were spelled incorrectly.

Photo of 1911 third grade Brandon School students

Life becomes a little confusing, however, because the first photo is named the 3rd Grade Class, but the second photo, below, is named the 5th Grade Class. Horace Kerby is pictured in both. He looks to be an age more closely aligned with 5th than 3rd grade. As with his ancestors, he became a painter by trade.

Photo of 1911 5th grade class at Brandon School

The names stated for the students in Miss Mary Milner’s fifth grade class were:

First row: Kilburn Faulkner, Edward N James, Audrey McKinney, Clayton White, May Anderton,  Annie Phillips, Katie Hewitt

Second row: Salone White, Louie Cole, Odie Ramsey, Theo Wilkes, Jesse F  Eastep,
Pink Gamble, Albert Douglass and Horace Kirby. Miss Mary Milner, teacher, is
not pictured.


The Acqueduct on the Muscle Shoals canal…

is the subject of this 1913 photograph.

acqueduct 1913