The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Posts tagged “Cherokee Alabama

So far away but so near in function…

were the kitchens of the plantations in our area of northern Alabama. Or at least the Pond Springs Plantation and the Cunningham Plantation seemed very far from each other in the horse and buggy days. One commonalty of the two plantation homes were their kitchens.


Pond Springs Plantation,  also known as the Joseph Wheeler Home, Hillsboro, Lawrence County, Alabama

The three houses now on the property include a dogtrot or double log cabin possibly built before 1818, a somewhat later two-story Federal-style house (1830’s), and the main wing built around 1872.

This photograph by Alex Bush, 1935 shows the kitchen at Pond Springs located in Lawrence County, Alabama in the Wheeler Basin community was typical of the kitchens of many plantations. Pond Springs originally was owned by the Hickmans who apparently sold their interest in the plantation, known as Pond Spring, to Colonel Benjamin Sherrod, partner in the initial kitchen at pond springspurchase of the property.

Colonel Sherrod was born in Halifax County, NC, migrated first to Georgia, then about 1818 settled in Alabama where he established several cotton plantations throughout the Tennessee River Valley. Sherrod’s own home, Cotton Garden, was located north of the nearby town of Courtland, and it appears that his eldest son, Felix, and his family lived at the Pond Spring place.

The owner of more than 300 slaves, Benjamin Sherrod was an early Alabama tycoon, with extensive and varied business interests. He also served as chief promoter and stockholder of the Tuscumbia, Courtland, and Decatur Railroad, one of the earliest west of the Appalachians.

The Pond Spring plantation passed from Sherrod’s son, Felix, to a grandson, also named Benjamin Sherrod. In 1859, Benjamin married Daniella Jones of nearby Caledonia plantation, and at the time of his premature death in 1861, the plantation became Daniella’s. Daniella (known as Ella) Jones Sherrod, born in 1841,  was the daughter of Richard Harrison Jones and his wife, Lucy Early, who was the daughter of Georgia Governor Peter Early. The Jones family had moved from Georgia to Alabama in 1822.

After Benjamin Sherrod’s death, Daniella returned to her parents’ home. Caledonia, where in the fall of 1863, she met General Joseph Wheeler while he and his troops camped near the Jones home. They were married following the War in 1866. Wheeler moved his family to New Orleans after the War Between the States for four years, then relocated back at Pond Springs where they raised their family of children.


Cunningham Plantation, now known as Barton Hall, located near Cherokee in Colbert County, Alabama

This reproduction of a drawing by Harry J. Frahn, 1937 of the plan of the kitchen at the Cunningham Plantation in Colbert County, Alabama seems typical of plantation kitchens of that day.

Drawing of the kitchen of Cunningham Plantation.These kitchens both, at Pond Springs and at the Cunningham Plantation, include a bedroom, presumably for the cook and her family. Thus confined, the cook was never relieved from work as she faced constant demands from the main house. John White, a former slave from Texas who lived in a kitchen- quarter, remembered that his proximity to the Big House made him a frequent target of his owner’s temper.

English: Cunningham Plantation (Barton Hall), ...
.


Do you ever wonder what the military men of the past…

think of what is going on in America today? The Shoals area abounds with men and women who have answered their nation’s call, sometimes during war time. We honor all veterans for their service and for protecting our freedom.

Thomas Franklin Woodis is one of those veterans. He served during World War I. Tom enlisted in the Army 6 March 1918 and was released 21 February 1919. He is first row seated on the right in the photograph. He was a very handsome soldier.Photo of Thomas Franklin Woodis in Army during World War I

Tom was born 4 December 1898 in Colbert County, Alabama. The Woodis family lived in Allsboro. Tom Woodis was the child of Charlie Bud Woodis and Lucy Francis McCaig Woodis. He was in a large family of children. His siblings were John Fletcher Woodis, Joseph Andrew Woodis, Charlie H Woodis, Mary Effie Woodis, William Wesley Woodis, Jessie James Woodis, Shelby L Woodis, Roe Harris  Woodis, and Terry Cohal Woodis.

Thomas Franklin Woodis, 90, Route 2, died Thursday, Feb. 9 1989, at Tishomingo County Hopsital, Iuka, Mississippi, after a brief illness.

In addition to being a veteran, he was a Methodist, and a retired farmer. The funeral was held at Alsboro Methodist Church. Burial was at Alsboro Cemetery near Cherokee, Alabama.

Survivors included his wife, Dora M Turner Woodis, Cherokee; son, Arthur Woodis, Cherokee; daughters, Marie Johnson, Lodi, California, Virginia Smith, Golden, Mississippi; and brother Terry Cohal Woodis, Florence; nine grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren. Son Roe Stanley Woodis died at the age of 48. He was a World War II veteran and was involved in a crash of the Sweat’er Out aircraft during the war.


The Goodloe family from Cherokee…

was a large family with roots in the Colbert county area, and well-respected. This photo of one of the sons from the Cherokee, Colbert County family of Goodloes will be a part of the telling of the Goodloe family history and will be featured in our future book. This photo was taken during a family reunion in 1917 in Smyrna, Tennessee. Smyrna is in Rutherford County where this Goodloe son relocated to and raised a family of children. He died and is buried there as well.

photo of the Goodloe family reunion in 1917

Back row, left-to-right:
William Ray Goodloe, Dr. James Bostick, James Camp Goodloe, Jr., Mrs. Max Holland Goodloe (Florence Hull Goodloe), Max Holland Goodloe, Calvin White Goodloe, Frank Grant Goodloe

Front row, left-to-right:
James T. Bostick, Charles Goodloe Bostick, Mrs. Faith Goodloe Bostick, James Camp Goodloe Sr., William H. Bostick, Mrs James Camp Goodloe (Faith White Goodloe), Jean Goodloe, Mrs. Frank G Goodloe (Enna M Goodloe?), Nelle Goodloe

Those in the photograph were named by  the great-grandson of Max and Florence Goodloe and the great-great-grandson of James Camp Goodloe, T. Berkeley Goodloe

James Camp Goodloe married Mary Catherine Kate White and they had the following known children: Faith White Goodloe 1877 – 1971, Camp Lee Goodloe 1880 – 1898, Michael Goodloe 1884 –    (this is possibly same person as Max Holland Goodloe), Max Holland Goodloe 1885 – 1978, Frank Grant Goodloe 1886 –   , William Ray Goodloe 1890 – 1948, Calvin White Goodloe 1891 –  , Thomas B Goodloe 1893 –   , and James Camp Goodloe Jr 1895 – 1941.


He is such a good little photographer…

just look at the magic that happened when he snapped this family portrait with his new camera Santa brought him for Christmas last year. Yep. That’s my little Logan. He is the Loganator. Gotta love him.

Vogue! Strike a pose.

If you look closely, our Taylor Anne Sledge is in the background and  happy playing with what Santa brought for her.


Half the population of Cherokee…

must have been at the Patrick famiy reunion.

Patrick Family Reunion

Thomas Sparks is currently overseas serving our country.


Ned Hays and his family…

vintage 1901. Ned is pictured with his new wife and his five sons.  They lived at Chickasaw in Colbert County, Alabama. Chickasaw was renamed Riverton and many Hays descendants live there today. Still others live in Cherokee and on the other side of  US Highway 72 in the county. The spelling of the name varies in documents over the span of years; sometimes it is spelled Hays and other times it is spelled Hayes. Historically, the name was Hayes and then some of the surname started going by Hays here in America.

Charles Nathaniel Ned Hays Family 1901 in Chickasaw Alabama 

Information  from the book “Hays-Hayes Kinfolk and Allied Families”  authored by Cora Isbell and published in 1976 states:

Our  family line Hays/Hayes decends from Jesse Hays a resident of Lauderdale County, Alabama (approx. 1830-1845?) later he moved to Franklin (now Colbert) County, Alabama (1845) where he died around 1859. his father was Kinchen Hays of Northampton County, North Carolina for which our information is very sketchy.

Jesse Hays worked as a tutor to the Wilcox (Wilcoxson) family and married one of the daughters. He was married to Sarah Ann Wilcoxson, and known children are:

  • Eliza Ann (born about 1836) Lauderdale County, Alabama
  • Sylvia Bell born April 7, 1837  Lauderdale County, Alabama                                                                                   
  • Mary S. born July 9, 1839 Lauderdale County, Alabama
  • Henry D. (Richard) abt. 1842
  • John Jesse born Aug 3, 1844 Lauderdale or Franklin
  • Isaac D. abt. 1847 (Died as Child?)
  • Edward Tustin April 15, 1856 in Franklin County, Alabama USA

Before Cora Isbell died she found proof that Jesse Hays born ca 1803 was the son of Kinchen Hays and Sylva Bell Hays, daughter of Samuel Bell of Northampton County, North Carolina. A deed in Lauderdale County, Alabama from Mary Parker to “my grandson Jesse Hays” identifies her as widow of Samuel Parker of Northampton County, North Carolina.  Mary was a Kinchen before she married  to Samuel. When Kinchen died in 1805 Jesse and brother Cornelious were wards of Darius Parker. When he died they were made wards of Josiah Parker. Sylva remarried Henry Sauls. Some of these families moved to Alabama.

Mary Dawson Kinchen was married twice. Her husbands were Arthur Hays and Samuel Parker. Arthur Hayes was Kinchen Hays’ father. Kinchen Hays was Jesse H. Hays’ father. Mary Dawson Kinchen’s mother was a Dawson.

Arthur Hays was born 1750 in Pennsylvania and died in North Carolina in 1833.  Quite a number of Hays children were born around 1750 in Pennsylvania, according to the American Biographical and Genealogical Index. A partial list of those listed as born were: Asa, Ada, Andrew, Archibald, Charles, David, Enoch, Elizabeth, George, Henry, Hugh, Jacob, James, John, Jonathan, Joseph, Koper, Magdalen, Margaret, Nathan, Nathaniel, Mordecai, Samuel, Solomon and the list goes on.

Current research gives Jesse H Hays’ family of children as follows: Henry D Hayes 1835 – 1868, Elizabeth Ann Hayes 1836 –  , Mary S Hayes 1837 –  , Sylvia Bell Hays 1838 – 1912, Charles Richard Hayes 1841 –   , John Jesse Hays 1844 – 1924, Isaac D Hayes 1847 –   , Edward Tustin Hayes 1856 – 1933.

Edward Tustin Hays was born 1856 in Riverton, Colbert County, Alabama. He married Mary Isabelle Strong in Nov of 1882.  Mary Isabelle Strong was born 1866. Ed died in 1933 and Mary died in 1956. Together they had the following children:  William Jesse Hays 1885 –  , Callie Laurine Hays 1887 –  ,Wiley Lester Hays 1887 –   , Mertie Bell Hays 1888 –  , Thadius Hays 1891 –   , Amos Franklin Hayes 1894 –  , Elmer Hays 1896 –  , Dossie B Hays 1900 – 1962, Dorey Hays 1900 –  , Maud Maudie Hays 1900 –  , and Richard I L Hays 1906 –   .

Dossie Bell Hays married Caledonia Donia Bell Hall. Known children are: May Bell Hays 1925-1981 and Annie Olean 1927-1966.

Hays or Hayes descendants are numerous throughout the Shoals area.


Sweet Taylor Anne…

is in ECM Hospital with pneumonia and severe dehydration. Her Mom says she is pitiful and that breaks my heart. Logan has strep throat and asthma problems now. The whole family has been sick with a stomach virus for what seems like forever. Taylor Anne Sledge is just one.

Taylor Anne Sledge


Hello Soldier, I am your brother…

Hillard and this is our little sister Alice.

Somehow it was always Alice who got into trouble, perhaps it was because Hillard just wouldn’t agree to punishment. Alice was in charge of seeing that her young brother got home in a timely manner from school – and herself for that matter. That must not have been an easy task because so much seemed to peak his interest. That particular afternoon the  trek home from the schools across town seemed particularly harrowing for Alice.

Hillard MurrayShe recounted the story of that afternoon and it seemed a movie was playing in her head as she relived the events of that unforgettable day. It was a day in early September of 1945. She was but nine years old, or almost for her birthday was in December. She was exasperated with her brother because she was sure that he would get her into trouble with his lollygagging.  After all the past is prologue.

Something had caught her brother’s attention further down the sidewalk in downtown Sheffield that particular day. He hurried to the store down the street.  I am sure she must have tapped those little feet and let out a few breaths of aggravation as she insisted that they go on down the road toward home; he refused to budge. Hillard later said it was a soldier with an Army duffel bag going down the street and then into the store.

When they reached the grocery store just a few blocks before the train tracks, Hillard stopped dead in his tracks. His little nose was pressed against the windowpane of the storefront window. Alice must have thought aloud and asked, what now?

World War II had just ended. Then, Alice noticed there was a soldier in there. The soldier was drinking a Coke. Alice noticed Hillard’s gaze go up to the soldier’s mouth  (and his little nose go up on the windowpane) as the soldier lifted the Coke bottle to his mouth, and then down as he lowered the bottle and its precious contents to the table again. Again. Again. And again. Alice nagged at him to come on,  let’s go home; but to him she was all but  invisible. All that mattered was that Coke bottle and the path it took from table to mouth, from mouth to table.

But then, she noticed something else. Maybe it was the soldier’s gold tooth that had her brother in awe of the young man in uniform. Not that the little boy and girl were not patriotic, but a Coke was a rare and precious commodity, and so was a gold tooth – a real genuine gold tooth. Gasp.

Of a sudden the little boy bounded forward and entered the store. She was caught unaware. She fumed as she considered that Hillard might have a nickel in his pocket. A nickel would buy a Coke, but just one.  She steamed that, dern, she didn’t know where he would get them but it seemed that Hillard always had a nickel in his pocket. A child with a nickel was exceedingly rare in those hard times that came on the heels of the Great Depression and a world war that had just ended. So, she drug her feet and went in after him hoping that he would just come on home with her and before she was to get into trouble because of his precociousness.

After entering the store, her brother continued to watch every move that the soldier made; every breath the soldier took. I insert here that I can all but tell you what happened next. That soldier asked the little boy, “What are you doing, Jabbo?”  The little boy was watching the soldier’s every breath; the sister was watching what would without a doubt be the little brother’s last breath. That was a certainty and an all but done deal.

Her brother made a query of the object of his intense study. He asked, “What is your name soldier?” The soldier answered, “James Murray.” The little boy said, “Soldier, I am your brother Hillard and this is our little sister, Alice.” Now, anyone with one eye and half-sense could predict what was to happen next.

Little brother and sister remembered for a lifetime the thrill of that day. Their mother had died when Alice was just a little girl and Hillard not much older. James Murray was but fifteen and the oldest child when his mother died. There was another brother, Ed Lee, who was the second oldest child.

Hillard and Alice recalled that their brother got them a taxi cab and they went shopping. Hillard and Alice recounted that, “He bought us everything.” Hillard stated about the day and the length of time it took to get home from that point that James must have known everybody in the town. It must have seemed like the whole entire town talked to and welcomed their big brother back home.  I don’t think anyone got in trouble that day for getting home late from school. To this day Hillard states that James was his hero. Much too late to ever tell him, I discover he is my hero, too.


Best Friends Forever…

yep and yessiree. Uncle Joel and his two best friends forever are in the photo below. At Taylor Anne’s first birthday party, I witnessed a very heartwarming conversation between Uncle Joel and the little one, Logan Sledge. It was Taylor Anne’s birthday but some of us brave ones countered someone’s wishes when we brought presents for the Wolverine as well as the Princess Birthday Girl.

One of those was Joel Speegle, or Uncle Joel to Taylor Anne and Logan. As he was about to give Logan his ‘forbidden’ gift, Logan bent his head back, really far, far back, to address the big guy standing in front of him. Looking at the difference in stature of the two Mutt and Jeff comes to mind, only more Jeff and less Mutt, if you remember those two.  He asked Uncle Joel, “Did you know that you are my best friend? My v-e-r-y best friend in the WHOLE wide world, Uncle Joel?” And I would say from the lump in lump in my throat and the tightening of Uncle Joel’s lip that he did know it as it went without saying. Joel and Zac, Logan and Taylor Anne’s father, have been bffs since early childhood; and the tradition carries on.

Joel Speegle is one of my heroes as he is serving overseas in the military, but he is scheduled to return home to Cherokee soon. But, not soon enough for his family I would wager. Godspeed Joel Speegle.

Uncle Joel and his BFF


I know he can hear me right now…

singing happy birthday, singing happy birthday very badly. But if it were a recording it would be recorded with love – lots of love. Happy birthday Zac Sledge. You are a wonderful son, grandson, and an awesome dad. And you and Anna have given us Taylor Anne who owns half of the little pieces of my heart and Logan who owns the other half of the little pieces of my heart. Happy birthday. Family, friends, and co-workers shared Zac’s birthday dinner at Logan’s Roadhouse in Florence last weekend.

Zac and Anna and those babies live in Cherokee, Alabama. Logan started Pre-K this year at Cherokee Elementary. His wonderful, and beautiful, teacher is Candi Rutland Malone. Taylor Anne is my little Queen-of-Quite-a-Lot. Logan used to pretend to be the foreman at the job – Jeff Sherrod. He was a really awesome foreman; he got a work badge to prove it.

Hey, Jeff Sherrod, I know what you want for your birthday! Roll Tide gear, right?

Zac Sledge's birthday dinner at Logan's Roadhouse

Anna Cain Sledge, Zac Sledge, Jeff Sherrod