The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Lauderdale County

Women are strong…

as evidenced even as far back as 1860.

Documented in the 1860 Lauderdale County, Alabama Slave Schedule for District 2 a 33 year-old female slave had five sets of twins in succession and all but three were alive at the time of the census record. The enumeration took place first day of June, 1860.

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That David Crockett was very prominent in our family lines…

he even married at least one of our allied ancestors.

I am in the process of proving a number of different family lines that date back to a patriot who either served or contributed in the Revolutionary War. Among those is Jeremiah Lucas. Some of the documentation of his patriotic service follows:

  • 1779   Age: 31 Roster of SC Patriots

Jeremiah Lucas enlisted in the Third Regiment on 10 Mar 1779 and was discharged in August 1779

  • 1780  Age: 32

    South Carolina

    Jeremiah served in the militia under Colo. Roebuck after the fall of Charleston (Roster of S. Carolina Patriots in the American Revolutionary War).

  • 1786 19 Aug  Age: 38

Jeremiah Lucas Rev pay Description: Militia pay since fall of Charleston in Roebucks Regiment

Jeremiah Lucas was the father of our Willis Lucas who was a Physician. Willis Lucas, M D was the father of our Sarah Frances Lucas who married Jacob Duckett Casey as his third wife and had our Willis Robert Lucas Casey who was born about 1841 in Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Jeremiah Lucas and wife Sarah Willis Ingram Lucas had ten known children. They were: Joseph Lucas 1773 – 1848, Ingram William Lucas 1777 – 1841, George Lucas 1782 – 1855, Jesse Lucas who was born 1788, Jeremiah Lucas born 1791, William “Willie” Lucas 1793 – 1861, Peggy Lucas born 1797, and Sarah Elizabeth H Lucas who was born 9 January 1801 in Union County, South Carolina; she died 13 July 1851 in Greenville, Hunt County, Texas.

Davy Crockett home

Home of Davy Crockett in Lawrence County, Tennessee

Sarah Elizabeth H. Lucas married John Hampton Hamilton, son of Jeremiah & Ann (Hampton) Hamilton on 7 Jul 1819 in Davy Crockett’s home, Lawrence County, Tennessee. The marriage was solemnized by Davy Crockett.

Place and Cause of death as transcribed from the Family Bible by Levin Hamilton and in a letter to Uncle Asberry & Aunt Liza Hamilton, dated August 13, 1882, Paris, Texas reads:  “Sarah H. Hamilton died at Greenville, Texas July 13, 1851 aged 50 years 6 mo 4 days- of fever. Her end was peaceful and happy rejoicing that she was going home to join those who had gone before “Blessed are the Dead who die in Lord”. C. A. Warfield.

Sarah Elizabeth H Polly Lucas Hamilton

Sarah Lucas Hamilton was the third person to be buried in East Mount Cemetery, Greenville, Hunt County Texas [Source: Honorable Mention Early Families Hunt Co, TX  R976.4272, Vol 3, page 34; record is located at the Dallas Public Library]. Her grave marker cannot be found and a letter to cemetery department brought news that the records went no further back than 1920. A fire had destroyed the records before that. After the fire a census was taken and if the grave was unmarked or unreadable they simply put “unknown”.

Known children of John Hampton Hamilton and Sarah Elizabeth H Lucas Hamilton were : William Carroll “Bill” Hamilton born 1820; Ann Hampton Hamilton Adams born 1821; Joseph Decator  Hamilton born 1822; Martha Parrom Hamilton Warfield born 1824; Jane Anderson Hamiton Tennyson born  1825; Jeremiah Jay “Jerry” Hamilton born 1826; Asberry Francis Hamilton born 1828; Joshua Butcher Hamilton born 1829; John Hampton Hamilton born 1831; Sarah Elizabeth Washington Hamilton Wilson born 30 Apr 1834; and George Willis Washington Hamilton born 30 Apr 1834.

There is no grave marker, but she was the third person buried in East Mount Cemetery. Over time her marker has been lost. East Mount Cemetery is located in Greenville in Hunt County, Texas.

Sarah Elizabeth H “Polly” Lucas Hamilton has qualified for the distinction of the Citizen Medallion of the Republic of Texas. The Citizen Medallion is to mark the graves or cenotaphs of people whose residence was in The Republic of Texas before 19 February 1846 before Texas became a state.

  • Citizen medallion Republic of Texas


There are a lot of unique things about the Shoals area…

and they are all good. The family of Dale Robertson had a most unique gravemarker made custom just for him, a motorcycle enthusiast. Dale is buried at Richardson Chapel Cemetery in Lauderdale County, Alabama. His family members say, he would love it. Here it is:

Dale Robertson gravemaker


Here is an excellent example of why our children need to…

be taught cursive writing in school. Lt Levi Casey issuing orders to troops during the Revolutionary War. This document is the actual handwriting and signature of Lt Levi Casey issuing an order to his soldiers during the Revolutionary War. It is dated 7 Aug 1782. Levi Casey rose in rank from Colonel to Lieutenant to Brigadier General during his tenure in the Revolutionary War. He was one of the reknown OverMountain men as was David Crockett.

Br General Levi Casey served terms as a House of Representative and then had been re-elected Senator but did not get to serve his last elected term because he had a massive heart attack and died Feb 1807. He was first interred at Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington, DC and in circa 1832 he was re-interred in the Congressional Cemetery.

His widow, along with her Duckett nephew came to Alabama before 1820 and settled in Lauderdale County, Alabama in the community of Rawhide. She, some of her children, and other relatives are buried in the Casey Family Cemetery on what used to be her property.

Transcription:
D____
I desire you will draft or other ways order one third of your company to hold themselves in readiness to march by the fifteenth of this instant to the Cherikees you are to provide flower/flour for sixty days provisions for each man and two good beef cattle and as pack horses a[re] not to be had would recommend that each man take horse and that one half carry forward and the other half act as horsemen and change as they can agree or be ordered and any that have not any horses of their own you are to impress in the bounds of your own company you are to collect all the swords you can and put them into the hands of the men.

August [symbols] 7th 1782                                                                                                                Cap [symbols] Saxon

I am ____and hum [symbols]
(take this to mean your humble servant)
Lt Levi Casey

Official Orders 7 Aug 1782

Official Orders 7 Aug 1782


There are heroes in every family…

and that is as true for the George family of Barton, Colbert County, Alabama as is for everyone. If you have not researched your family history, you may not even know how many heroes that you carry around a little bit of them in your dna today. It is important for children to know their roots, and then it is up to their parents to give them wings. Jennifer George asked about her George lineage. And just a short intense study of the family provides a lot of ground work for Jennifer and her family to add to; photos are especially important in family history in my estimation and only the family can provide those, except maybe for grave marker photos. Jennifer George’s parents are Lloyd George and Cheryl Ussery George. Floyd’s parents were Wilmer and Jessie Pearl Johnson George. Wilmer’s full name was Velma G but was called Wilmer, or perhaps that was a middle name. Jessie Pearl Johnson’ parents were John William Johnson or perhaps John Thomas Johnson; researchers have given both names for her father. Wilmer George and Jessie Pearl Johnson George had three known children: Clarice George Holt, Wilmer J George and Lloyd Douglas George. The following is gleaned from Lloyd George’s obituary:

Lloyd Douglas George, 48, Colbert Heights, died Nov. 9, 2001.The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, 2001, at Morrison Funeral Home chapel, Tuscumbia, with burial in Tuscumbia Oakwood Cemetery. Officiating will be Tommy Heaps and Charles Richey. Mr. George was a native of Sheffield. He was the former owner of Georges Wrecker Service. He was a member of Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church. Mr. George was preceded in death by his father, W.G. George; brother, W.J. George; and sister, Clarice Holt. He loved deer hunting, arrowhead hunting and fishing. Above all, he loved Courtney (Pawpaws girl).He is survived by his wife of 27 years, Cheryl Ussery George, Colbert Heights; mother, Jessie George, Tuscumbia; daughter, Jennifer George Wilkinson, Colbert Heights; grandchild, Courtney Wilkinson, Colbert Heights; nieces, nephews and many friends. Pallbearers will David Koon, Randy Jackson, Don Southall, Gilbert Borden, Mark Handley, James Bingham, Benji Dunn and Terril Chapman. Published in Florence Times Daily on November 11, 2001

With a cursory review of the military records, I do not find any record that a Velma or Wilmer George served during WWII, but that alone does not mean that he did not serve. Velma “Wilmer” George’s obituary which is shown here names his three children and states that he leaves five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. All his known siblings were still living except one, David Allen George who was born 1923 and apparently died in 1932.

Obit for Velmer Wilmer George Velma “Wilmer” George’s parents were David Keylon or Kellan George and Sarah Anna Moody George (1890-1987 ). They had three known sons and three known daughters. Their children were:  Velma G Wilmer George  (1910 – 1992), Martha Ida George Patrick (1913-1997), Odell Elizabeth George Patrick (1915-2010), David Allen George (1917-1991). Charlie George (1923-1932), John William George (1926-1998) and daughter Frances George Pate born 22 August 1932.

David George’s 5 June 1917 registration card for WWI provides the following information: he was 30 years of age, he had a wife and three dependent children, he farms for self, he is tall, has blue eyes and light hair, and is not bald, and he signed the document with his mark. It also gave his name as David Kellan George and his birth date as 18 December 1888 (whereas grave marker give birth as 19 December 1888) and states he was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee. David and Sarah Anna Moody married 23 Jun 1906 in Cherokee, Alabama. David died  17 March 1965 in Colbert County, Alabama. He like most of the family named George are buried at Barton Cemetery.

David George’s parents were William Alexander George and Martha Catherine “Mattie” Harbin George who was born 30 November 1873 in Lincoln County, Tennessee and died in 1962.  William Alexander George was born in 1853 in Lincoln County, Tennessee and died in June o f 1921 in Colbert County, Alabama. He reportedly died from the effects of contracting Typhoid Fever. Their children were:  Mahaley George Oliver (1870-1937, Nancy George Bolden (1876-1966), Sarah Minnie Lee George Lindsey (1884-1967), David Keylon George (1888-1965), Robert B George (1890-1951), John Thomas George (1891-1967), Oscar George (1894-1929), and Arthur George (1894-1927).

If this is the same William and Martha (sometimes listed as Margaret) who were in Rhome, Wise County, Texas in 1920,1930, and 1940, there may have been more children. A daughter named Nona is listed on those census records.

William Alexander George’s parents were named William and Nancy Perry George. William Alexander George first wife and family were: wife Nancy Marilda Fanning (1824-1850) and children Benjamin George, Elizabeth D George and Mahaley Marilda George who may have married Pleasant D Reynolds.

William George was born 1810 in Tennessee likely in either Franklin or Lincoln County and died 1896 in Smithfield, Lincoln County, Tennessee. His burial site is unknown at this date. He was called Billy by family and friends.

It would seem that William George may have  had a second family as well: wife Elisabeth R Clifton and children Ira Barker George born 1834, Nancy M George (1837-1900), Reuben W George  born 1839, William George born 1841, Sarah E George born 1842, Catherine Olive George born 1844, Mary Elizabeth George born 1847, and Isabella George. This needs more research to disprove or prove it, but seems possible since one of the sons was named Reuben. It appears that this Mrs George removed to Texas.

William George married again to Nancy Perry (1824-1897). Nancy Perry was the daughter of James Perry and Mary Polly Oliver Perry. William George and Nancy Perry married 6 May 1847 in Lincoln County, Tennessee. They had the following children:  James M George (1848-1899), Sarah Jane George (1850-1880), Samuel Jefferson George (1852-1910), William Alexander George (1854-1921), Felix Philander George (1858-1939)  who was called Dock, and M C George (1861-1870).

William and Nancy Marilda Fanning George’s son, Benjamin was killed in action during the War Between the States. Son, Samuel Jefferson George married Mary Elizabeth Fowler and he was born and died in Lincoln County, Tennesse. Samuel Jefferson George was a farmer. He was born on the 4th of July 1846 and died 18 September 1933. His burial was in Fanning Cemetery in Lincoln County.  Samuel J George and Mary Elizabeth Fowler George had the following children: Aldar George Mearse (1893-1963), Hannah George Pruitt (1898-1985), Mary Louella George Taylor (1900-1958), and Louellar George Taylor (1920-1921). It is possible that other William George’s sons also served during the War Between the States, but the scope of this limited research does not cover whether they served.

Photo of Samuel Jefferson George

 

William George’s parents were: Reuben George and Nancy Hodges George. Reuben George was born 31 Jul 1776 in Bedford, TN or Virginia and died  in Aug 1854 in Coffee County, Tennessee. No burial site has been located. Reuben was married first to Ann Handley, or so it would seem, but the dates are not adding up. Their son was Jacob Handley if indeed his wife was Ann Handley. Further research is required for this to be a certainty.

Reuben and Nancy Hodges George were married 13 June 1798 in Jefferson County, Tennessee. They  had the following children: Eleanor Ellen George born 1799, Rebecca Elizabeth George (1804-1882), Edmond George (1807-1887), William George (circa 1808-1876), Susan George born circa 1809, Travis George (1810-1860), Daniel George born 1816, Nancy E George born 1820,Mary Ann George born 1822, Louisa George born 1824, and Mariah George born 1829. There may also have been a son named Charles.

Reuben George (Junior’s) father was also named Reuben George born  25 Nov 1749 in Culpepper, Virginia and died 16 Jan 1832 in Pendleton, Virginia. His mother was Mildred Rogers George 1733-1788. She was buried in Stokes County, North Carolina. There seems to have been a large family of children of born to Reuben and Mildred Rogers George. The names listed are not verified as accurate, but listed just for reference in future research: Phillip George, Anna George, Mary Molly George, Rebecca George,  Lucy George, Byrd George,  Joseph George, Travis George,  Jesse George, Joseph George, Anne George, John George, Presley George, William George, and James George. If I counted correctly that is fifteen children; seems like too many for one mother, but it is believed possible.

Reuben George pension application for service during the Revolutionary War number i s S395567 as accessed from the “U. S. Revolutionary War Pensions and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900.” Reuben served as a Private  from Pendleton County Virginia, under the command of Col. Edward Stevens of the Virginia Line for a term of war for three years.  He was inscribed on the Roll of Virginia at the rate of 8 dollars per month to commence on the 4 of December 1818 with the Certificate of pension issued the 13 of Mary 1819? and sent to Hugh Holmes, Esq. in Winchester, Virginia. His Survivors Pension Application archive # M804. The Archive Roll number is 1062 and there are a total of 18 pages.

At the age of 68 when he made application he stated that he was enlisted at Pendleton County, Virginia in (the spring) of 1777  in Culpepper County, Virginia. He seemed to have lived in Pendleton County, Virginia at the time. He served in a company commanded by Captain John Elison, 10 Virginia Regiment and served until __ day of November 1783 when discharged at Hackensack, New York. He took part int he battles at Germantown, Brandywine, and White Marsh.

There are George family papers, 1718–1936. 163 items. Mss1G2937a and  are likely housed in Virginia.

This collection concerns four generations of the George family primarily of Fairford, Thornberry, and White Chimneys, Caroline County. Included is correspondence of Lewis George (1779–1847) with Elliott M. Burruss discusses the hiring of slaves (folder 1). There are papers of John Dudley George (1758–1781) including a copy of his will dated 17 March 1780 giving directions for the division of his slaves among beneficiaries (folder 5). Reuben George’s will  written 16 May 1799 provides for the bequest of named slaves (folder 6). And there are papers of Henry Hortensius George (1824–1902) include an undated list of slaves divided into lots and with monetary evaluations provided (folder 8).

There are certain to be errors in this research, as there always seem to be when you can not have in your hand the primary documentation for each and every record. Corrections will be needed and other information added by the family. Hopefully this gives them a sound foundation on which to build their family history.

With just a day and night devoted to intense research, the George family can now know with certainty that they have heroes within their family. You can not get much higher in hero status than being a soldier of the Revolution.


The Rolling Store…

was a part of my mother’s childhood in Colbert County, Alabama. There used to be a store at the corner of Wilson Dam Road and 6th Street. There she and her siblings would take an egg and get penny candy. Or the Rolling Store would come by and an egg would be traded for penny candy. If you look around the 10:00 minute mark you will see the Murphy Brothers Rolling Store that used to traverse the roads in Lauderdale County. This story is among those of the Great Depression:


History gone…

again. The photo below is of the Old Mel White homeplace on Bumpass Creek Road in Lauderdale County, Alabama. The owners are pictured and are identified as Mel and Elizabeth Scott White.

Mel White homeplace on Bumpass Creek Road


Strange that…

two  young women from two different lines of a family could be classmates at college in 1913.

Miss Eulalia Kerby and Miss  Sarah LUTIE Murray were both in the Freshman class at State Normal College in Florence in 1913.

Here is part of the list of freshmen for that class:

Photo of freshman class in year 1913

There is a list of students in the Freshman class of 1913 at State Normal School and this photo. There were no names attached to identify what names match which person.

List of some of the freshman class 1913

Small world.


Sometimes you find family history in unexpected places…

and this is one case.  The photograph below represents the third grade class at Brandon School in 1911. Miss Coplan was the teacher. The students in the photograph are named as follows:

First row:Hamer Gamble, Theo Wilks, Oscar Hardiman, Paul Trammel, John Smith,
Clyde Cole, Paul Faulkner

Second row: Daisy Kirby, Teresa Johnson, Ethel Kirby,
Gertrude Trammel, Mae Rickard, Alma Nichols, Gertrude Cole, Audrey McKinnley,
Ethel Ray, Elsie Ray, Colina Bevis

Third row: Alvin Landrum, Charlie Freeman, unknown, Ray Harris, Hoarse Kirby, Ann Laura Hale, Miss Coplan, Maud Tucker, Leslie Patterson, unknown, Susie Adams

Three of the Kerby children are shown in this photo: Daisy Kerby, Ethel Kerby and Horace Kerby, but of course the names were spelled incorrectly.

Photo of 1911 third grade Brandon School students

Life becomes a little confusing, however, because the first photo is named the 3rd Grade Class, but the second photo, below, is named the 5th Grade Class. Horace Kerby is pictured in both. He looks to be an age more closely aligned with 5th than 3rd grade. As with his ancestors, he became a painter by trade.

Photo of 1911 5th grade class at Brandon School

The names stated for the students in Miss Mary Milner’s fifth grade class were:

First row: Kilburn Faulkner, Edward N James, Audrey McKinney, Clayton White, May Anderton,  Annie Phillips, Katie Hewitt

Second row: Salone White, Louie Cole, Odie Ramsey, Theo Wilkes, Jesse F  Eastep,
Pink Gamble, Albert Douglass and Horace Kirby. Miss Mary Milner, teacher, is
not pictured.


Oh, how we long to know our roots…

and where we came from. Marie Purdy Myrick and Tim Purdy  have a nice surprise coming their way. She posted on Facebook that showed up in our newsfeed page with a request for help with her family history. And we can help a little.

We traced back as far as Francis Purdy. Francis Purdy had a son named Ebenezer Purdy whose son was James Purdy. James Purdy  married Phebe Purdy (Peter , Francis 3-2-1) a cousin. James was born 1750 in Westchester County, New York. He first removed to Dutchess and then to Chenango County, New York. The migration of the family followed along these lines: Canada>New York>Michigan>Washington state. James Purdy had a son named Stephen Purdy.

The lineage then follows that Stephen Purdy had a song named Josiah Purdy. Josiah’s parents were Stephen Purdy born 1788 and Sally whose last name remains unknown.

Josiah Purdy was born 1806 and married Rachel Diantha Hartwell who was sister of Colonel Samuel Hartwell who had married Phebe Purdy, an aunt of Josiah’s. They lived at Georgetown, Hamilton Township, Dutchess County, New York.Photo of Sarah Singer Purdy Hath Josiah had a brother named Nelson Purdy who lived at Cleveland Ohio. There was also a sister named Sally born 1813 and there must have been other siblings. Further research will be needed by the family.

If research took us along the right path Josiah had the following children: Horace born 1835, Lavinia born 1839, Egbert Francis born 1841, Lucretia born 1844, Preston born 1846, Loren born 1849 and Arminia Alice born 1851.

Josiah Purdy had a son named Preston Purdy, likely Preston C Purdy. Preston C Purdy married Sarah Elizabeth Singer. The photo is of Sarah Singer Purdy. Sarah Singer’s parents were Job Singer and Huldah Randal

This map shows the incorporated and unincorpor...

This map shows the incorporated and unincorporated areas in King County, Washington, highlighting Seattle in red. It was created with a custom script with US Census Bureau data and modified with Inkscape. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Palmer. Josiah and Sarah Purdy had one child, Orren Jay Purdy. Sarah married second to Jerome Bonaparte Hath and had a number of children, seven if the count is right; six boys and one girl. Preston married a second time to Eurista or Eulista Lapham and had a family of children. 

Orren Jay Purdy married Annie Nettie Scott whose parents were Willard and Jennie Scott. By 1930 Orren was a widower. Orren served honorably in the Spanish American War [one record has him listed as a civil war solder, but that is not possible because he was not born until 16 May 1882 although another birthdate is noted.  He was born in Red Willow County, Nebraska. He served as a Private in Co B, 30th Regiment of US Volunteer Infantry. Orren J Purdy died i18 Nov 1954 and  is buried at Oak Hill Cemetery in Owosso, Michigan. Orren Purdy may have had more children, but he did have a son named Esley Truman Purdy

Annie Nettie Scott Purdy apparently had three husbands. First was husband  Orren Jay Purdy. They had the one son, Truman Esley Purdy. The second marriage was to Albert Anthony Lepard who was born ca 1868. The children from that marriage were Charles Lepard 1910 and Warren Eugene Lepart 1911-1987. The third marriage was to Edward F Gruebner born ca 1888. Their children were Max F Gruebner born ca 1920, Earl W Gruebner born ca 1922, and Betty Jane Gruebner born ca 1927.

Esley Truman Purdy was born about 1905 in Genesee County, Michigan and died 11 Oct 1956 in Seattle, King County, Washington.

E T Purdy was an employee or a member of the crew on several ship voyages. It appears that the voyages started in 1951 and ended in 1955. There was a number of them. Some are listed below.

Elsey Purdy was on the voyage from Seattle Washington that sailed 18 Oct 1951 and arrived at Yokohoma Japan 25 Nov 1951. On that voyage E T Purdy was employed for seven months as an Evap. Util. He can read, is 5″10″ and weighs 175 pounds. The ship was named the General Mason M Patrick.

He made a voyage from Yokohoma Japan to Seattle arriving in Seattle on 22 May 1952. The ship was named General Simon B Buckner and he was 46 years old.

He was on a voyage that departed from Pusan Korea and arrived in Seattle 5 July 1954. The ship was named Marine Adder; he was 47 years old.

He was on a voyage from Pusan, Lorea that arrived in Seattle 8 Jan 1955. The ship was named the Sergeant Archer T Gammon; he was 47.

Esley’s wife was likely Letha Irene Fort. Esley Trumen Purdy died at age 51 on 11 Oct 1956 in Seattle, King County, Washington; his wife died three years later. Reports are that he was killed, whether by accident during a voyage or what is not known at this time. The only record found to date of a Serah Blood, who the family gives as his wife was for a Sarah May “Sadie” Blood who married a Ridenhour. Further research is recommended.

Their son Truman Esley Purdy is next in the family line, but there may be other children. He was born 20 Apr 1936 or 1933 in Michigan and died  23 Feb 2000 in Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama. He is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama. He married Mary Lena Kimbrough and there are at least two children: Tim Purdy and Marie Purdy Myrick of the Shoals area. The Veteran’s Gravesites, ca. 1775-2006 record  has the following information and birth year of 1933 instead of 1936:

Name: Truman Esley Purdy
Service Info.: PVT US ARMY KOREA
Birth Date: 20 Apr 1933
Death Date: 23 Feb 2000

 On the 1940 census record Esley was listed as four years old and in the household of his father and mother. They lived on Belsay Road in Flint, Genessee County, Michigan.