The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

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An idea that maybe we will take up…

Old Photograph Contest. I am working on the details as we speak.

This is a photograph submitted for consideration in an old photograph contest by a newspaper. It is an outstanding photo of an annual reunion of the Peebles Family. Unfortunately, this Peebles family descends from Robert Peebles of Ulster, Ireland. That Robert Peebles was of Scot descent, but many Scots were remanded or left for Ireland and left their Scotland home behind; these are the some of the Scot-Irish that would come to America. The Ulster Peebles are not kindred of Captain David Peebles, or so well respected researchers  state. Nonetheless, it is a piece of history and should be valued.

Peebles family reunion newspaper clipping

So many Peebleses and so little time…

William Henry Peebles and some of his grand and great-grandchildren: Kenneth and Jimmy Jinks; and Tootsie and Betty Peebles children of his son Houston Coleman “Buddy” Peebles.

to document them all, but I try. William Henry Peebles 1871-1947, son of George Henry Peebles and Catherine “Kate” Rebecca Jane Terry Peebles and brother to our Robert Duncan Peebles, was married twice. His wives were Sally C Alexander and Eliza Holland Graham.

By his first wife William Henry Peebles  had two known children: Maggie Peebles and Katie Peebles. Maggie Peebles married Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Terry and had a large number of children that included: Leonard R Terry born 1910, Clarence Terry born 1915, Bessie Terry 1919-1924, Cleveland Henry Terry 1922-1992, William Terry born 1923, and Bruce M Terry born 1928. They were all born in Lawrence County, Alabama. Daughter Katie Peebles married Isaac “Ike” Terry 1887-1963 as his first wife. They had three children: Willie L Terry 1911-1988,  Katie F Terry 28 April 1913-19 Dec 1987, and John Henry Terry 1 Aug 1915-19 Feb 1992. John Henry Terry owned Terry’s grocery store in Decatur; and had worked as a carpenter helper in his younger years. Isaac “Ike” Terry was the son of George Washington Terry, Jr and  Sarah V “Sallie” Watson, his third wife. Ike Terry had eighteen known children by his three wives.

William Henry Peebles married a second time to Eliza Holland Graham 1880-1939. They had the following known children: Ida Peebles born 1896, James Walter “Jim” Peebles 1898-1927, Lura Segalia Peebles 1899-1973, Nan Marie Peebles Maness 1903-1976, Velma Eren Peebles 1904-1990, Fannie Lavenia Peebles 1906-1971, William Henry “Will” Peebles 1908-1966, Elbert Lee Peebles 1910-1961, Buford May (Cook )Peebles 1912-1926, Robert McKinely Peebles 1914-1986, Houston Coleman “Buddy” Peebles 1919-1969. There are interesting histories with all but especially for Eliza Graham Peebles and Lura Segalia Peebles.

Elibert Lee Peebles married Naomi Lee Jinks born 9 January 1908 in Haskell County, Texas and died 14 December 1989 in Lawrence County, Alabama. Her parents were Allen Jinks and Lockie V A V Edwards. Elbert Lee Peebles was born 29 September 1910 in Lawrence County, Alabama and died 3 February 1961 in Morgan County, Alabama. Their children are: Annie Ruth Peebles who married an Evans, then an Adkins, Peggy Peebles who married a Chapman, Mildred Peebles 1938-2011 who married George L  Madison, Pfc Elbert Lee Peebles 24 January 1929- 27 December 1949, James Alford Peebles 16 February 1931-22 August 1994, FREDrick Eugene Peebles 19 February 1933- 5 November 2010, Mildred Peebles 1938-2011, Wendell Houston Peebles 10 Mar 1941- 2 December 2002 (died in Georgia), Carl PRESTON Peebles 25 February 1943- 5 January 2011, Charles Russell Peebles and Shirley Jane Peebles 1948-1991 who married Jerry DeWayne Skipworth Jr. Shirley Peebles Skipworth’s eulogy was presented by Rev Houston Peebles; her middle name in her obituary states June, but is likely Jane.

Charles Russell Peebles, son of Elbert and Naomi Jinks Peebles, married Linda Christine Parker. He worked at Otasco and was lauded as a top salesman. They have two children: Angie Peebles Watson and Amanda Peebles.

Photo of Charles Russell Peebles

Isbell roots in the Shoals area spread far and wide…

and there are some prominent figures among them. As part of my goal to place as many markers on unmarked graves as possible, especially for ancestors, I purchased a chronicle marker for Capt. Godfrey Daniel Isbell who is likely buried in the oldest cemetery in Madison County, Maple Hill.

There are other cousins of the Isbell family who have done a lot of documentation of the family, most notably Ray Isbell who is a descendant of John Birdwell who married Sarah H Isbell and his documentation is appreciated and some of it incorporated here. Captain Godfrey Daniel Isbell was one of our family heroes. He and other family members secured our nation’s independence from the rule of a king.

Captain Godfrey Daniel Isbell

Birth:
1750 Lunenburg County, Virginia

Death:
1812 Madison County, Mississippi Territory, now Alabama

Godfrey Isbell served as a Captain in the Revolutionary War in the North Carolina Militia. He performed admirably in battle and participated in the Battle of King’s Mountain and the Battle of Musgrove’s Mill. He provided patriotic service and civil service during the war.

Godfrey Isbell was the son of Henry Isbell Jr. and Hannah Isbell of Virginia.

His exact grave site remains unknown but thought to be buried at Maple HIll, reputedly the oldest cemetery in Huntsville. Although formally established by deed recorded in 1822, the oldest intact gravemarker appears to be that of Mary Frances Atwood who died in 1820. And his burial would have been even earlier than that in 1812.

Some list his wife as Martha Milton, others give the wife’s name as  Hannah Clark. He may have married twice or more. Some notes that reference Godfrey Isbell that are documented follow:

1771 in Charlotte, Albermarle County, Virginia:
Godfrey Isbell, Thomas Isbell, and Pendleton Isbell posted a bond of 50,000.00 lbs for Godfrey’s appearance in court to answer to the charge that he did beat and ill treat David Gordon. (ref., John Carlton of Orange County and Albemarle County, Virginia by George H. Caldwell)

March 19, 1780:                                                                                                                                                                                                         Godfrey Isbell served in the Washington County, North Carolina (Tennessee) Militia

Feb. 21, 1782:                                                                                                                                                                                                               Godfrey Isbell was bondsman for his first cousin Thomas Isbell when he married Discretion Howard in Wilkes County, North Carolina. This couple is described as Presbyterian by descendant Zella Armstrong but they are buried at Grandin Baptist Church, Caldwell County, North Carolina.

This Thomas Isbell is not to be confused with Godfrey Isbell’s son Thomas Isbell who had four wives.

Thomas Isbell was also a soldier of the Revolutionary War and has a multitude of descendants still. From his Sons of the American Revolution application file is excerpted the following:

From family Bible in possession of the family                                                                                                                                       “Thomas Isbell enlisted at the age of 18 and served two years.”                                                                                              A pension was allowed Discretion [nee Howard]Isbell, widow of Thoams Isbell, in 1843 for the actual serivce of her husband in the Virginia troops. See certificate of Bureau of Pensions under date of September 15, 1897 which verifies the above statement and is attached hereto. (apparently lost, as it is no longer attached.”

August 10, 1783:                                                                                                                                                                                                             Wilkes County, North Carolina : warrant issued in death of John Anderson, killed in a fight in December according to the Anderson family history.

1793: in South Carolina

1799-1800: in Cumberland County, Kentucky

1801-04: in Wayne County, Kentucky

1808: Godfrey was living in Warren County, Tennessee, where he was a member of the first Warren County Court. His land adjoined the land of James Gailey.

March 19, 1811:                                                                                                                                                                                                       Minutes of Cumberland Presbytery: At Big Spring, Wilson County, Tennessee: Godfrey Isbell, was a representative from Liberty Congregation.

The obituary of Godfrey’s son Jabez’ daughter Lucinda Isbell Bookman states that she joined Cumberland Presbytery “early in life,” so a reasonable deduction is that Jabez was Prebyterian also.
The First Presbyterian Church of Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama was not established until 1818.

1811:                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Godfrey Isbell sold land in Warren County, Tennessee, when he moved to Alabama. In 1813, his widow Hannah Isbell was listed on the tax lists for Madison County, Alabama.

1815:                                                                                                                                                                                                                             Hannah and Jeptha Vining Isbell were on the tax list for Madison County.

November 1816:                                                                                                                                                                                                         Jabez Isbell was issued letters of administration on the estate of Godfrey Isbell at the Orphans Court of Madison County, Alabama. Hannah may have died by this time.

1816:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    The estate of Godfrey Isbell was inventoried by John Birdwell, one of the founders of Enon Baptist Church and First Baptist Church of Huntsville (1809). Two of John Birdwell’s daughters married granddaughters of Capt. Godfrey Isbell’s first cousin, Zachariah Isbell Jr. Those daughters are mine and Ray Isbell’s ancestors as is John Birdwell.

John Birdwell, who inventoried Godfrey Isbell’s estate, was one of the founders of Enon Baptist Church (First Baptist of Huntsville), which in 1810 was located a few hundred yards north of the present terminal of the North Huntsville Executive Airport. The small building, exact location unknown, was “close to the river bank…affording a convenient place for baptismal services. For some reason, perhaps a shortage of funds, construction was halted short of completion. Almost two years later, 6 Feb 1813, a new committee was named…to complete the work, and while there was apparently no fanfare to herald its conclusion, the structure was finished and in 1815 did accommodate the second annual meeting of the Flint River Association.” Of note is that Godfrey Isbell was NOT shown in the membership records of that Baptist Church.

Documentation may be found in the following sources:

Annals of Tennessee (1853) by James G.M. Ramsey, p.212

History of Cumberland County (1947) by J.W. Wells, p.35

Tennessee Cousins by Worth S. Ray

The King’s Mountain Men by Katherine White, page 192

The Overmountain Men (1986) by Pat Alderman, p.59

The Patriots at King’s Mountain (1990) by Bobby Gilmer Moss

History of Tennessee by Goodspeed, p. 455

Revolutionary Virginia: The Road to Independence by Brent Tartar, p. 357

Service Source:
NC ARCH MILITIA ROSTER OF WOMACK’S FORT RAMSAY: ANNALS OF TN P 212; ASHER,WILKES CO CT MIN VOL I P 29; NC ARMY ACT BK A PT 12,P 1650
Service Description:
1) ALSO SOL CAPT JACOB WOMACK; COL JOHN SEVIER,GRAND JUROR.
2) WILKES CO 1781; FURNISHED SUPPLIES

Some documentation for the relatives of the Captain will be noted here. A wife of Godfrey Daniel Isbell was Hannah Clark who died in 1816. Godfrey’s children include sons: Thomas Isbell 1784-1862,  James Milton Isbell 1784 – 1814, and Jeptha Vining Isbell 1787-1836. A brief of Dr Isbell’s life and family follows:

Dr Jeptha Vining Isbell

Birth: 1787
Death: 1836
Tuscaloosa County
Alabama, USA

Dr Isbell was a state legislator, and was among the founders of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Dr. Jeptha Vining Isbell lived in Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama, where his father, Godfrey Isbell, died about 1812.Jeptha moved to Tuscaloosa about 1816, because he is on numerous records there and is considered among the founders of that city. He served in the state legislature at various times as well as (per one reference) in the State Senate. He probably went to St. Stephens and Cahaba during 1817-21 or traveled there when the house and senate were in session.He was a member of the House of Representatives, Second session begun and held at the town of Cahawha, on the first Monday of Nov 1820 (ref., MSS. History of Tuskaloosa, by Hon. W. Moody).He purchased property as a Homestead entry on 9 July 1823 in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. The homestead entry for eighty acres was located here: 1 W½SE HUNTSVILLE No 21S 9W 24.Tuscaloosa became the state capitol in 1826, and Jeptha V. Isbell was already living there. The book PIONEERS OF TUSCALOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA PRIOR TO 1830 has several pages containing references to Dr. Jeptha V. Isbell.Jeptha Vining Isbell served during the War of 1812. U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815 provided the following information about Jepthah V Isbell and his service:  Name: Jepthah V Isbell  Company: DYER’S REG’T, CAVALRY AND MTD. GUNMEN, TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS.  Rank – Induction: PRIVATE  Rank – Discharge: PRIVATE  Roll Box: 108  Microfilm Publication:He married first to Asbury Cash (born 1787), daughter of James Cash and Margaret Dozier Cash. After her death, he married her sister Margaret Dozier Thomas (born 1783), widow of James Thomas, and had one daughter, Hypasia Ann Isbell.The widow Margaret Dozier Thomas Isbell married Daniel Wright 9 Jan 1827 in Lawrence County, Alabama, marriage performed by Manoah Hampton, Justice of the Peace. Manoah Hampton was a person of great historical value, but that is another story.Hypasia Ann Isbell, daughter of Jeptha V. Isbell and Margaret Dozier Thomas Isbell Wright, married Judge Andrew M. Wright, her stepfather’s son by his first wife.

 

Son of Godfrey Isbell, Thomas Isbell was a very interesting character.

Thomas Isbell

Birth: 1784
Montgomery County
Virginia, USA
Death: 1862
Monticello (Wayne County)
Wayne County
Kentucky, USA
From the strongest evidence, Thomas Isbell was the son of Capt. Godfrey Isbell in that he witnessed Godfrey’s consent for his daughter Nancy’s marriage.By his four wives (Leah Francis, Sarah McBeath, Sophia McLain, and Sarah J. Calhoun) he fathered 21 children.Thomas Isbell’s name first appeared in Wayne County, Kentucky, records, 5 March 1804, when he signed a marriage bond for James Brooks and Nancy Isbell [who was born in Virginia]. A note was included with the bond which states:
(1)”To Godrey [sic] Isbell- Sir as it is necessary for me to have your permission from under your hand therefore send by William Simpson.”
(2)” This may certify you that I have given consent for my daughter Nancy to James by Godfrey Isbell- witnessed by Thomas Isbell and Samuel Forbes.”
Thomas Isbell’s relationship to Nancy and Godfrey Isbell is not stated, but brother and son is probable as it was customarily an older brother who served as bondsman for a younger sister’s wedding. “However, it is to be noted that none of Thomas’ children were given the Christian name
of Godfrey.” (ref., June Baldwin Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky Marriages, 1801-1860, 1972. Vol.I, A-J,p. 153).Wayne County, Kentucky Marriages,1801-1860, (1972) by June Baldwin Bork, Vol.I, A-J,p. 153 and p.176: The Isbell Cemetery is located across the road from the old Isbell house (supposedly haunted) and on Ray Ellers farm in Wayne County. The reason for no Isbell stones is, according to tradition, that Thomas Isbell was superstitious about them. In an unidentified report, this home was described as having been built in the late 1700s, made of hewn logs with two floors and two huge fireplaces. The kitchen was as large as the main room. There was a front and back porch and was located on what is now Highway 167- the road from Monticello to Cooper in Wayne County.His wives were Leah Francis Isbell 1785-1833 and Sarah Jane Calhoun Isbell 1825-1890. He is buried in the Isbell Cemetery in Wayne County, Kentucky.

Another son of Godfrey Isbell was James Milton Isbell. There are probably other children as well.

James Milton Isbell

Birth: 1784
Death: 1814
Walker County
Alabama, USA
His state of birth is not known, but could have been Lincoln County, Kentucky or Pendleton County, South Carolina. Researchers state different birth states.There are discrepancies in the reported death place; some also give his date and place of death as 1812-13 in Wayne County, Kentucky, and others say Warren County, Tennessee and yet others, like me give it as Walker County, Alabama. There seems to be no documented burial.Some give his mother’s name as Martha Milton, but since he married Hannah Clark in the year 1795 in Lincoln County, Kentucky and she did not die until 1816, Hannah Clark Isbell is deemed his likely mother.James Milton Isbell married Sarah Jane Wallace, who was born in 1784 in Kentucky. And though her death date is not known, her burial place is given as Lawrence County, Alabama. There were at least two children born to this couple: Barbabas Wallace Isbell who was called Barney by family and friends. He was born 1809 and died 1853 and Godfrey Jefferson Isbell who was born 1811 and died 1877. At the present date that is all the information about James Milton Isbell and his family.

Yet to be explored are these siblings and their families. From the list of those of the Isbell surname who served in the War o f1812, it begs to question whether our Godfrey Daniel Isbell who was a Captain in the Revolutionary War who one of the Godfrey’s who served in the Virginia Militia during the War of 1812. This question arises in my mind with his death date. And if not our Godfrey, then who are these Godfrey Isbells as that was not a common name in our family lineage.

Isbells who served in the War of 1812:

Godfry – Pvt 1 Reg’t (Clarke’s) Virginia Militia
Godfrey – Pvt/Corpl 7 Reg’t (Gray’s) Virginia Militia
Godfrey – Pvt 8 Reg’t (Wall’s) Virginia Militia
James – Pvt 5 Reg’t Virginia Militia
James T. – Pvt 7 Reg’t (Gray’s) Virginia Militia
John – Pvt 41 Reg’t (Trueheart’s) Virginia Militia
John W. – Pvt Flying Camp (McDowell’s) Virginia Militia
Lewis M. – Pvt 1 Corps D’Elite (Randolph’s) Virginia Militia
Robert S. – Pvt 7 Reg’t (Gray’s) Virginia Militia
William – Pvt 64 Regiment Virginia Militia
William I. – Ensign 8 Reg’t (Wall’s) Virginia Militia
Jabas – Pvt Dyer’s Reg’t Cavalry and Mounted Gunmen, Tennessee Vol.
Jepthah V. – Pvt Dyer’s Cavalry and Mounted Gunmen, Tennessee Vol.
Miller – Pvt 3 Reg’t (Johnson’s) East Tennessee Militia
Temple – 2 Lieut. Bunch’s Reg’t (1814) East Tennessee Militia
Thomas – Corpl. Bunch’s Reg’t Mounted (1813-1814) East Tennessee Militia
Thomas – Corpl. 5 Reg’t (Booth’s) East Tennessee Militia
Thomas (Isabell) – Pvt 2 Reg’t (Cheatham’s) West Tennessee Militia
Daniel – Pvt Nash’s Regiment South Carolina Volunteers
Jabas – Pvt 16 Reg’t (Burrus’) Mississippi Militia
Levingston – Pvt 3 Reg’t (Miller’s) Kentucky Militia
Littleton – Pvt 5 Reg’t (Atkinson’s) North Carolina Militia

There are heroes in every family…

and that is as true for the George family of Barton, Colbert County, Alabama as is for everyone. If you have not researched your family history, you may not even know how many heroes that you carry around a little bit of them in your dna today. It is important for children to know their roots, and then it is up to their parents to give them wings. Jennifer George asked about her George lineage. And just a short intense study of the family provides a lot of ground work for Jennifer and her family to add to; photos are especially important in family history in my estimation and only the family can provide those, except maybe for grave marker photos. Jennifer George’s parents are Lloyd George and Cheryl Ussery George. Floyd’s parents were Wilmer and Jessie Pearl Johnson George. Wilmer’s full name was Velma G but was called Wilmer, or perhaps that was a middle name. Jessie Pearl Johnson’ parents were John William Johnson or perhaps John Thomas Johnson; researchers have given both names for her father. Wilmer George and Jessie Pearl Johnson George had three known children: Clarice George Holt, Wilmer J George and Lloyd Douglas George. The following is gleaned from Lloyd George’s obituary:

Lloyd Douglas George, 48, Colbert Heights, died Nov. 9, 2001.The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11, 2001, at Morrison Funeral Home chapel, Tuscumbia, with burial in Tuscumbia Oakwood Cemetery. Officiating will be Tommy Heaps and Charles Richey. Mr. George was a native of Sheffield. He was the former owner of Georges Wrecker Service. He was a member of Wesley Memorial United Methodist Church. Mr. George was preceded in death by his father, W.G. George; brother, W.J. George; and sister, Clarice Holt. He loved deer hunting, arrowhead hunting and fishing. Above all, he loved Courtney (Pawpaws girl).He is survived by his wife of 27 years, Cheryl Ussery George, Colbert Heights; mother, Jessie George, Tuscumbia; daughter, Jennifer George Wilkinson, Colbert Heights; grandchild, Courtney Wilkinson, Colbert Heights; nieces, nephews and many friends. Pallbearers will David Koon, Randy Jackson, Don Southall, Gilbert Borden, Mark Handley, James Bingham, Benji Dunn and Terril Chapman. Published in Florence Times Daily on November 11, 2001

With a cursory review of the military records, I do not find any record that a Velma or Wilmer George served during WWII, but that alone does not mean that he did not serve. Velma “Wilmer” George’s obituary which is shown here names his three children and states that he leaves five grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. All his known siblings were still living except one, David Allen George who was born 1923 and apparently died in 1932.

Obit for Velmer Wilmer George Velma “Wilmer” George’s parents were David Keylon or Kellan George and Sarah Anna Moody George (1890-1987 ). They had three known sons and three known daughters. Their children were:  Velma G Wilmer George  (1910 – 1992), Martha Ida George Patrick (1913-1997), Odell Elizabeth George Patrick (1915-2010), David Allen George (1917-1991). Charlie George (1923-1932), John William George (1926-1998) and daughter Frances George Pate born 22 August 1932.

David George’s 5 June 1917 registration card for WWI provides the following information: he was 30 years of age, he had a wife and three dependent children, he farms for self, he is tall, has blue eyes and light hair, and is not bald, and he signed the document with his mark. It also gave his name as David Kellan George and his birth date as 18 December 1888 (whereas grave marker give birth as 19 December 1888) and states he was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee. David and Sarah Anna Moody married 23 Jun 1906 in Cherokee, Alabama. David died  17 March 1965 in Colbert County, Alabama. He like most of the family named George are buried at Barton Cemetery.

David George’s parents were William Alexander George and Martha Catherine “Mattie” Harbin George who was born 30 November 1873 in Lincoln County, Tennessee and died in 1962.  William Alexander George was born in 1853 in Lincoln County, Tennessee and died in June o f 1921 in Colbert County, Alabama. He reportedly died from the effects of contracting Typhoid Fever. Their children were:  Mahaley George Oliver (1870-1937, Nancy George Bolden (1876-1966), Sarah Minnie Lee George Lindsey (1884-1967), David Keylon George (1888-1965), Robert B George (1890-1951), John Thomas George (1891-1967), Oscar George (1894-1929), and Arthur George (1894-1927).

If this is the same William and Martha (sometimes listed as Margaret) who were in Rhome, Wise County, Texas in 1920,1930, and 1940, there may have been more children. A daughter named Nona is listed on those census records.

William Alexander George’s parents were named William and Nancy Perry George. William Alexander George first wife and family were: wife Nancy Marilda Fanning (1824-1850) and children Benjamin George, Elizabeth D George and Mahaley Marilda George who may have married Pleasant D Reynolds.

William George was born 1810 in Tennessee likely in either Franklin or Lincoln County and died 1896 in Smithfield, Lincoln County, Tennessee. His burial site is unknown at this date. He was called Billy by family and friends.

It would seem that William George may have  had a second family as well: wife Elisabeth R Clifton and children Ira Barker George born 1834, Nancy M George (1837-1900), Reuben W George  born 1839, William George born 1841, Sarah E George born 1842, Catherine Olive George born 1844, Mary Elizabeth George born 1847, and Isabella George. This needs more research to disprove or prove it, but seems possible since one of the sons was named Reuben. It appears that this Mrs George removed to Texas.

William George married again to Nancy Perry (1824-1897). Nancy Perry was the daughter of James Perry and Mary Polly Oliver Perry. William George and Nancy Perry married 6 May 1847 in Lincoln County, Tennessee. They had the following children:  James M George (1848-1899), Sarah Jane George (1850-1880), Samuel Jefferson George (1852-1910), William Alexander George (1854-1921), Felix Philander George (1858-1939)  who was called Dock, and M C George (1861-1870).

William and Nancy Marilda Fanning George’s son, Benjamin was killed in action during the War Between the States. Son, Samuel Jefferson George married Mary Elizabeth Fowler and he was born and died in Lincoln County, Tennesse. Samuel Jefferson George was a farmer. He was born on the 4th of July 1846 and died 18 September 1933. His burial was in Fanning Cemetery in Lincoln County.  Samuel J George and Mary Elizabeth Fowler George had the following children: Aldar George Mearse (1893-1963), Hannah George Pruitt (1898-1985), Mary Louella George Taylor (1900-1958), and Louellar George Taylor (1920-1921). It is possible that other William George’s sons also served during the War Between the States, but the scope of this limited research does not cover whether they served.

Photo of Samuel Jefferson George

 

William George’s parents were: Reuben George and Nancy Hodges George. Reuben George was born 31 Jul 1776 in Bedford, TN or Virginia and died  in Aug 1854 in Coffee County, Tennessee. No burial site has been located. Reuben was married first to Ann Handley, or so it would seem, but the dates are not adding up. Their son was Jacob Handley if indeed his wife was Ann Handley. Further research is required for this to be a certainty.

Reuben and Nancy Hodges George were married 13 June 1798 in Jefferson County, Tennessee. They  had the following children: Eleanor Ellen George born 1799, Rebecca Elizabeth George (1804-1882), Edmond George (1807-1887), William George (circa 1808-1876), Susan George born circa 1809, Travis George (1810-1860), Daniel George born 1816, Nancy E George born 1820,Mary Ann George born 1822, Louisa George born 1824, and Mariah George born 1829. There may also have been a son named Charles.

Reuben George (Junior’s) father was also named Reuben George born  25 Nov 1749 in Culpepper, Virginia and died 16 Jan 1832 in Pendleton, Virginia. His mother was Mildred Rogers George 1733-1788. She was buried in Stokes County, North Carolina. There seems to have been a large family of children of born to Reuben and Mildred Rogers George. The names listed are not verified as accurate, but listed just for reference in future research: Phillip George, Anna George, Mary Molly George, Rebecca George,  Lucy George, Byrd George,  Joseph George, Travis George,  Jesse George, Joseph George, Anne George, John George, Presley George, William George, and James George. If I counted correctly that is fifteen children; seems like too many for one mother, but it is believed possible.

Reuben George pension application for service during the Revolutionary War number i s S395567 as accessed from the “U. S. Revolutionary War Pensions and Bounty Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900.” Reuben served as a Private  from Pendleton County Virginia, under the command of Col. Edward Stevens of the Virginia Line for a term of war for three years.  He was inscribed on the Roll of Virginia at the rate of 8 dollars per month to commence on the 4 of December 1818 with the Certificate of pension issued the 13 of Mary 1819? and sent to Hugh Holmes, Esq. in Winchester, Virginia. His Survivors Pension Application archive # M804. The Archive Roll number is 1062 and there are a total of 18 pages.

At the age of 68 when he made application he stated that he was enlisted at Pendleton County, Virginia in (the spring) of 1777  in Culpepper County, Virginia. He seemed to have lived in Pendleton County, Virginia at the time. He served in a company commanded by Captain John Elison, 10 Virginia Regiment and served until __ day of November 1783 when discharged at Hackensack, New York. He took part int he battles at Germantown, Brandywine, and White Marsh.

There are George family papers, 1718–1936. 163 items. Mss1G2937a and  are likely housed in Virginia.

This collection concerns four generations of the George family primarily of Fairford, Thornberry, and White Chimneys, Caroline County. Included is correspondence of Lewis George (1779–1847) with Elliott M. Burruss discusses the hiring of slaves (folder 1). There are papers of John Dudley George (1758–1781) including a copy of his will dated 17 March 1780 giving directions for the division of his slaves among beneficiaries (folder 5). Reuben George’s will  written 16 May 1799 provides for the bequest of named slaves (folder 6). And there are papers of Henry Hortensius George (1824–1902) include an undated list of slaves divided into lots and with monetary evaluations provided (folder 8).

There are certain to be errors in this research, as there always seem to be when you can not have in your hand the primary documentation for each and every record. Corrections will be needed and other information added by the family. Hopefully this gives them a sound foundation on which to build their family history.

With just a day and night devoted to intense research, the George family can now know with certainty that they have heroes within their family. You can not get much higher in hero status than being a soldier of the Revolution.

Researching a name like Narmore…

ought to be easy, right? You would think so, and the further back you go the easier it gets because all the variations in spelling seem to dissolve into one – Narramore.

My great-grandmother was Mollie Normour or Naremore or Narmor or Narramore. I started researching her in earnest any number of times, but each time was more frustrating than the last.

Actually there are other misspellings of the surname, but I forget the others. Listen, my children, for you are going to hear (or read) of the tragedy visited upon six of the most helpless of them all. And, it relates to the Narmore (and variant spellings of the same name) descendants everywhere.

I was researching the family of Narramore which connected to my Narmore lineage. Every minute since I discovered this unthinkable event, I have worried over these six little ones. Your line of Narmore’s may not even be connected with this line, but the story is a tear jerker at any rate. Get a tissue, you will wad it up, I promise you.

First, let us target the only happy part of the tragedy. In 2002, August 4th to be exact, a granite memorial marker was placed and dedicated to the six Narramore children in the Riverside Cemetery in Barre, Massachusetts. The ceremony was attended by approximately three dozen. In the audience was the town historian, members of the Barre Historical Society, local politicians, and the Massachusetts Secretary of State. The six precious souls were laid to rest in pauper’s graves without even a gravemarker. The group gathered to remember the six slain children . The crowd dignified the existence of these six little souls with the gathering and placed a fitting memorial marker to document their short little lives. Two musicians played a flute duet for the occasion.

On 21 March 1901 in Coldbrook Springs, sometime in the early afternoon, Lizzie Naramore killed her six children one by one. She began with the oldest and proceeded one by one to the youngest child. One by one she banged and chopped these precious souls to an unrecognizable condition using a club and an ax in the kitchen of the family home. She then, took a knife to slice her throat, but the cut was not severe enough to cause death.

Elizabeth Ann “Lizzie” Craig Narramore  made a plea of guilty in Worcester Superior Court to the murder of her eldest child, daughter Ethel Marion Narramore, age 9. She was found not guilty by reason of insanity. Mrs. Narramore was sentenced to life in the state hospital in Worcester. After serving a short five year sentence in the asylum, on 30 November 1906, she was decreed to be sane and released.

I have done considerable research on this family and their forebears. Elizabeth Craig Naramore was a native of St. Andrews, New Brunswick, which is in Canada. Promotions for the area say that “everything about our town is special, including our status as a National Historic District, one of the oldest and loveliest in the Maritimes. St. Andrews is a treasure trove of beautiful architecture, unparalleled scenery and rich marine life; and our streets remain steeped in turn-of-the-century charm”. St. Andrews sounds like a place one would hesitate to leave.

At the age of 19 she met and married Frank Lucius Narramore, born in Winchester, New Hampshire, but of Baldwinville, Massachusetts. It appears her friends and family were opposed to the match. Frank and Lizzie married 25 Oct 1890 in Templeton, Massachusetts. The couple removed to Coldbrook Springs, near the town of Barre in central Massachusetts.

Mrs. Naramore was described as a hard worker and a loving mother. Husband Frank Narramore, who worked at the nearby Parker Lumber Company, was a well paid worker but also dependably undependable, abusive, and a womanizer. While Frank wasted the money he earned, Lizzie and their six children lived in poverty.

The children were young. These angels’ names were:

Ethel Marion Narramore, age 9;

Charles Edward Narramore, age 7;

Walter Craig Narramore, age 5;

Chester Irving Narramore, age 4;

Elizabeth Narramore, age 3; and

Lena Blanche Narramore, age 12 months.
A  little distant in time, but  before the massacre, Lizzie reached out to the Overseers of the Poor in Baldwinville for assistance. When the overseers visited the Narramore home they determined that the Narramore’s situation was dire to the extreme. Because of the dilapidated condition of the home and the absence of food for the children or family, the decision was made to take the children away from the parents. Five of the children were to be placed with foster families and the youngest, an infant, would be sheltered at a poorhouse in Holden, Massachusetts.

Before the authorities were able to take her children away Lizzie made  preparations  and then killed them one by one and then tried to kill herself. She survived the suicide attempt though there was a cut to her throat. Lizzie Narramore made a plea guilty to the murder of her oldest child Ethel Marion Narramore. There was never  a trial  for the murders of the other children.

Elizabeth Naramore was committed to the state mental asylum. After her release she left central Massachusetts to work as a clerk in a Boston department store, returning once in 1907 to visit the graves of her children. Frank Naramore left Barre after the children’s funeral and the subsequent trial of his wife. There are reports that he was never heard from again; and for sure the townspeople likely never wanted to  hear from him again. In hindsight, he was in plain sight. In 1930 he was a roomer, at age 67, in the household of Charles H Voller with Voller’s  wife, and two daughters. They lived on the last house on Congress Street in Worcester, Massachusetts. In 1931 he was in the city directory in Worcester and listed as a carpenter. He died in Worcester, Massachusetts in 1936, but no grave-site has been found.

At the funeral for the children, the Reverend Charles Talmage, pastor of the Barre Congregational Church, gave an impassioned speech which placed the blame for the situation squarely on Frank Narramore as an abusive father and the community at large for turning a blind eye to all but criminal home situation for those six precious souls. I don’t know, but I do fairly believe that I would have taken an ax and a club to a no good for nothing husband rather than my precious kids.

Below is the newspaper article about it in the Arizona Republic; published 22 March 1921.

 

How many whacks with an ax and club did Lizzie deliver?

How many whacks with an ax and club did Lizzie deliver?

References:

Arizona Republic, Article: “An Insane Mother Sacrifices Her Offspring”, daily newspaper, front page, 22 March 1921.

Bradford L. Miner. (2002, June 30). A final tribute ; Six slain children will be forgotten no longer. Telegram & Gazette,p. A1. Retrieved 18 July 2014, from Massachusetts Newsstand. (Document ID: 130795151).

Bradford L. Miner. (2002, August 5). A town bears witness ; Barre memorial honors six slain children: Telegram & Gazette,p. B1. Retrieved 18 July 2014, from Massachusetts Newsstand. (Document ID: 146878981).

 

 

Constable John Birdwell was killed in the line of duty…

and later the cemetery where he was buried was ploughed under.Some family members give his name as John Alexander Birdwell and his birth year as 1795 while others say 1812 and call him John Birdwell Jr. It is not believed his father had the middle name of Alexander, however. He was born 1812 in the Mississippi Territory in what would become Madison County, Alabama.He was murdered 19 December 1871 at Linn Flatt in Nacogdoches County, Texas performing his duty as Constable. According to his niece Addie Birdwell’s bible, Uncle John’s body was brought 12 miles from Linn Flat to be interred in the family cemetery at Mt. Enterprise.”The Mitchells of Linn Flat,” by Gweneth A. Marshall Mitchell (1981), page 114, referenced John Birdwell, Jr., dying in the notorious Linn Flat Raid and stated that John Birdwell, Sr., John Birdwell, Jr., and John Calhoun Birdwell were buried in a row in the family graveyard in Mt. Enterprise, Rusk County, Texas. (the Allen Birdwell place). The burial site was pastureland in the 1960s-80s and no markers are there to identify it, as written in Adeline Birdwell’s Bible; also, that “Uncle John had married Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson–1859. He was murdered 1871.”A little background is needed to better flavor the gruesomeness of the end of our John Birdwell’s life. The topography ofBirdwell House historical marker that area of the Republic of Texas was naturally beautiful. It was made up of gently rolling hills and beautiful small valleys. The soil was known as ‘red’ while there was also sanded soil and rich black soil. The white population came mainly from the deeply southern states; many came from Alabama. The state was noted as the ‘sickly’ state as the sanitary conditions and the change in climate caused many illnesses that the settlers struggled in coping with and had a hard time in general. That moniker was a strike against the area and likely caused some to change their minds about relocating there. Those hailing from the southern states often heard their fathers speak of ‘the hatful of quinine’ they took before leaving their Alabama birthplace for Texas. Where they settled in Linn Flat was one of the prettiest plateaus
in East Texas. From the description, it seems that it looked a lot like the area in northern Alabama where they had lived previously. OurBirdwells were some of the first settlers of the Republic of Texas and ofNacogdoches County as they followed not too long afterthe the first Americans arrived in 1880. Allen BBirdwell who was a State Representative was likely the first to venture to the faraway Republic of Texas. He represented Rusk County in the Texas state legislature, Nov 7, 1853 – Nov 5, 1855 (District 22), 5th legislature session, and Nov 2, 1863 – Aug 6, 1866 (District 13), 10th legislative session. It is seems he came around  1831, liked it and went back to his Alabama homeland to return circa 1842 with his fatherJohnBirdwell, brother JohnBirdwell and sister LucindaBirdwellVaught. It is noted by some researchers that JohnBirdwell the father may have been in the Republic of Texas in the 1830; could it have been he was traveling with son AllenBirdwell on his first visit? They were certainly there before the first Constitution that was formulated in 1185; and just after Davy Crockett’s arrival in Texas in 1833. The Linn Flat county jail was constructed after their arrival as it wasbuilt in 1850 at a cost of $900.

Rusk County, Texas. Later moved to Monte Verdi Plantation.

Allen Birdwell home Rusk County, Texas 1844. Later moved to Monte Verdi Plantation.

The farmer who claimed ownership of the land piled all the grave markers in the ditch nearby and ploughed up the cemetery in the 1960s. Today the cemetery has reportedly been planted in pine trees to further obliterate it. John Birdwell Jr. was the father of James Andrew Birdwell (1835-1914), father of Henry W. Birdwell, father of Clara Emma Birdwell who married John Alfred Collier and was the mother of singer, dancer and actress Ann Miller (April 12, 1923 – January 22, 2004). The following is one account of the gruesome death of our John Birdwell posted by Ray Isbell, original source is not known:

THE MURDER OF CONSTABLE JOHN BIRDWELL:

On December 14, 1871, two Texas state policemen, Columbus Hazlett and William Grayson, attended a justice of the peace court session in the Linn Flat community. When the two men were in disagreement with an action by the Court, they caused a disturbance and threatened to shoot one of the lawyers. Justice Dawson charged them with contempt. An arrest warrant was issued, and Dawson gave it to Constable John Birdwell to execute. Constable Birdwell summoned a deputized civilian named David W. Harvell to assist him in the arrest of the two state policemen. The constable then located Hazlett nearby and arrested him. Hazlett offered no resistance, and on Birdwell’s command called to Grayson in a nearby store.When Grayson drew near, Hazlett told him, “I am a prisoner.” Grayson said, “Die before you surrender.” Deputized Citizen Harvell then demanded Hazlett hand over his gun. Instead, Hazlett drew his weapon and shot Harvell in the chest. But Harvell did not go down. He staggered though a nearby store door, picked up a shotgun, and fired the first barrel into Hazlett’s face. Hazlett was hit by only a few pellets, but the second barrel discharged in the direction of Grayson, wounding him. Hazlett and Grayson returned fire, twice hitting Harvell, who dropped dead on the store floor. Constable Birdwell never had a chance to draw his weapon, and was looking down the barrels of the state policemen’s guns when they mounted their horses and rode off.On December 19, 1871, Constable John Birdwell answered a knock on his door in Linn Flat and was shot dead. Arrest warrants were issued for Grayson and Hazlett.

About a week later Lt. Thomas Williams, a respected member of the state police, rode into Linn Flat with Grayson and Hazlett. Lt. Williams negotiated with Sheriff Orton for several days over the arrest and confinement of the two state policemen. No settlement was reached, and Williams rode away one night with his two prisoners. Soon after, the state police chief returned to surrender Hazlett and Grayson to the sheriff.

Grayson was convicted and sent to prison for life. Hazlett escaped from jail before his trial, fled to Arkansas, and was later killed by bounty hunters.

Following is the text from Chapter VII of The Book of Nacogdoches County, Texas entitled “The Linn Flat Raid” pages 35-46.

During Governor Davis’ administration, the legislature passed a law  creating a State Military force, under the name of STATE POLICE. This body of men, or military organization, was filled by appointments  of the Governor, and through the Adjutant General, was absolutely under his control. The members of this force, both officers and privates, were paid high salaries. Members of this force (policemen) were stationed in almost every country in the State. The force was regularly officered, with captains, lieutenants, sergeants, etc., and were under the absolute control of their superiors – each member of the force was mounted on a good horse and armed with a winchester rifle and two six shooter pistols, and wore a badge indicative of the force to which he belonged, and his official rank in that branch of the State Service. This was a time of peace. The member of this force contended that they were not amenable to the civil law for any infractions of the law, and they could only be tried by a Court Martial composed of members of their own body.

Governor Davis at this time (during the existence of the armed body of men) asserted that he had the right (power) to declare martial law and suspend rite of habeas corpus, which, in several instances, he accordingly did. The organization of this force could have but one object, viz: to keep the people of the State of Texas in a state of subjection. Armed members of this force were enjoined by their Chief to attend every election in the State, and to keep a close espionage on the ballot-box. The members of this force were generally ignorant and vicious men, fit instruments with which to accomplish the nefarious purposes of a despot. The INSTRUMENTS frequently acted on their own account and without orders from their superiors, to gratify their individual lust, malice or avarice – clothed with almost unlimited power. They abused this power to an almost unlimited extent, and the people were the sufferers. In the course of time these irresponsible “instruments” became a terror to the law-abiding citizens. When one of the MOUNTED GUARDS of Governor Davis would enter some quiet little country town, the inhabitants would be stricken with terror, and “wonder whose turn would come next.” The entrance of a Janizary into some  quiet little Ottoman village would not inspire such terror among the villagers as would the entrance of one of these policemen into some little country town in Texas. These Janizaries of Governor Davis, on account of the political party to which they belonged and their affiliation with and pretense of friendship for the negro, had considerable influence over the negroes, which influence they were never known to exercise for any good purpose, but to the contrary, they frequently instigated them to do deeds of lawlessness and crime. On the fourteen of December, 1871, in the town of Linn Flat, Nacogdoches county, David W Harwell was causelessly and brutally murdered by Columbus Hazlett and William Grayson. Hazlett and Grayson were both members of the Gov Davis’ state police force. This murder struck terror to the hearts of the people of the entire community – the citizens felt as though they were left without any protection from the law. The murderers belonged to an organization, or military force that asserted its superiority to the civil law. The perpetrators of the bloody deed, in their own persons, and as a privilege of the peculiar military organization of which they were members, declared that they were not amenable to the civil laws for their acts and that they could only be tried  a court martial composed of members of the state police force. The citizens generally and the civil officers were were afraid to take almost any steps in the matter for fear that their actions in the premises might be considered as a resistance to the state’s constituted authorities and martial law declared over the country, which would inevitable bring on a reign of terror and of bloodshed. In this trying time there was found one equal to the emergency, whose whole desire to to serve his county, avert bloodshed, maintain the supremacy of the law and bring the perpetrators of crime to punishment.

The ends of history would be put poorly accomplished, were the mead of historic praise withheld from one who served his county so faithfully and efficiently, as R D Orton, sheriff of this county, did this county in the Linn Flat raid. By his exertion, the declaration of material was avoided, the criminals brought to justice, and the supremacy of te civil law over the military maintained, and peace restored tot he county. The day Harvell was killed, G Dawson, Esq., then justice of the peace for Linn Flat precinct, held his court in Linn Flat. Grayson and Hazlett were in Linn Flat that day (14th of Dec., 1871) they were in some way dissatisifed with the proceedings and declared that they intended to break the court up, and even threatened to shoot the attorney (old man Clute, who was then addressing the court in behalf of his clients,) they were loud and vociferous and continually in contempt of court. Patience had ceased to be a virtue, and the justice of the peace issued a warrant for the arrest of Grayson and Hazlett, charging them with contempt of court. The warrant was placed in the hands of John Birdwell, constable of that precinct. Birdwell summoned Harvell, (the deceased) and others to assist him in making the arrest. Birdwell then endeavored to execute the warrant by making the arrest therein commanded. He informed Hazlett that he had a warrant for his arrest. Hazeltt replied: “I surrender.” Birdwell then asked him: “Where is Grayson?” Hazlett replied: “He is around at the shop.” Birdwell said call him. Thereupon Hazlett called Grayson, “I am prisoner.” Grayson replied: “The hell you are. Die before you surrender.” Harvell, who was standing nearby, said to Hazlett: “If you are a prisoner, give up your gun.” Hazlett replied: “Damn you, do you demand my gun? I will give you the contents of it.” Thereupon Hazlett elevated his gun, and discharged its contents into the breast of Harvell, inflicting a mortal wound, of which he did not instantly die, or fall to the ground, but stepped back into the store of S D Carver, (in the door of which he was standind,) and picked up a double-barrel shot-gun off of the counter, and fired one of the barrels at Hazlett, hitting him in the face, (the gun was loaded with bird-shot.) Harvell discharged the remaining barrel at Grayson, hitting  him somewhere on the head. Grayson returned the fire at least, if he did not shoot first. Harvell walked behind the counter and died in a few minutes. Hazlett fired several times at Harvell. Harvell was shot twice. No further efforts were made that day to arrest the murderers. They were left in undisputed possession of the field of battle. The murderers stayed in Linn Flatt several hours after the murder. About 4 o’clock in the evening, they mounted their horses and left Linn Flat for Grayson’s house, three miles north of Linn Flat. The killing occurred about 1 o’clock, p.m. After the murder of Harvell, the murderers collected thirty or forty negroes together at the house of Grayson and openly defied the law of the land, asserting and claiming an immunity from arrest by the civil authorities.

Information of the state of affairs at Linn Flat was sent to R D Orton, sheriff of this county, at Nacogdoches; he instantly summoned a posse of 10 or 15 men, and hastened to Linn Flat. He reached there on the 16th and found that rumor had not exag[g]erated the awful state of affairs. The people of that ocmmunity were despondent and panic stricken, they felt that the foot of the tyrant was upon their necks.

“Hope withering fled, and mercy sighed ‘farewell.”

Up to this time, the magistrate (Dawson) had not issued warrants for the arrest of the murderers, and they were still at large. Col Orton knew and felt that he had a patriotic duty to perform, the violators of the law must be arrested and brought to trial if possible – the  supremacy of the law must be vindicated, to do this was only his duty as sheriff of this county. But to accomplish these results required prudence and judgment. The offenders against the law were state officials – the state executive only wanted an excuse or pretext to declare martial law in the county, and quarter soldiers on us. One hasty or illadvised step would have ruined the county. Col  Orton felt and knew all this, and took his measures accordingly to arrest the offenders. The result proved that he was equal to the occasion, “that he had the heart to resolve, the head to contrive, and the hand to execute.” Col Orton left his posse in Linn Flat and went to the house of the justice of the peace, (Dawson) for the purpose of obtaining warrants necessary for the arrest of the murderers. (Dawson lived a mile and a half west of inn Flat.) The justice issued warrants for the arrest of Grayson and Hazlett, and placed them in the hands of Col Orton. On the way to Grayson’s house (the headquarters of the murderers), Col Orton and his posse, encountered twenty-five or thirty well-armed negroes. Owing to the advantages of the situation, the sheriff’s party took the negroes at a disadvantage and compelled them to surrender. “They were immediately disarmed and sent under sufficient guard, to the town of Nacogdoches, some seventeen miles distant.  The sheriff’s party then proceeded to Grayson’s house, but did not find him or any of his accomplices there. They searched the whole country around Linn Flat and even extended their searches into Cherokee and Rusk counties, but could find no trace of the murderers.

The general opinion was that they had fled the country. In the meantime, the negroes that had been sent to Nacogdoches as before states, were brought back and released,with he approval of all parties, except the sheriff, Col Orton, who said and thought that it was bad policy to release them just at that time, for , if Grayson and Hazlett had not really left the country (which he doubted) it would be strengthening their hands and reinforcing their party, for he questioned not but that the negroes would be as ready to support the murderers as ever. But, he was almost alone in this opinion, and for once gave up his judgment in the matter to that of the majority, which, subsequently, all had occasion to regret.

After this, the sheriff disbanded his posse and returned to his home in the town of Nacogdoches. On the night of December, 1871, five days after the murder of Harvell, at the hour of midnight, John Birdwell, constable of Linn Flat precinct, was called to his door and shot down, like a dog, upon his own threshold. He died instantly. There was no doubt but that Grayson and Hazlett were the murderers, assisted by some others. When this last murder became known, the people were almost paralyzed with fear, the secret assassins were abroad in the land, their awful acts were being done in the darkness of the night -courage was no protection against the midnight murderer; prudence would avail nothing; the hearth-stone and the fireside were no longer a protection – NO ONE KNEW WHOSE TURN WOULD COME NEXT- the negroes were the friends of the murderers – an internec[c]ine war was to be feared News of this second murder reached Col Orton on the 20th. He again summoned a posse and repaired to the scenes of the bloody tragedy. When he arrived at Birdwell’s house, the body of Birdwell, who had been dead some 26 hours, was not prepared for burial, no inquest had been held upon the body; nothing had been done. Col Orton immediately on his arrival at the scene of the murder, went for the magistrate, and induced that officer to repair to the place of the murder and hold an inquest upon the dead body of the murdered man. The justice issued a vinire for a jury of inquest, and the sheriff served it. A jury was empanneled and returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased had come to his death from a gun shot wound from the hands of parties unknown. Justice Dawson that night, (it was in the night when the inquest was held), issued a warrant for the arrest of Hazlett and Grayson, Marion Grayson, Jordon King, J W Grayson, Marion Grimes and E F Deshaser. The warrants were place din the hands of the sheriff. The sheriff then summoned an additional posse, probably amounting to near one hundred men, and thoroughly and diligently searched the whole county, extending the search into the neighboring counties, and without results, the searh having proved fruitless, the fugitives having fled to Austin, evidently to secure the favor and protection of Governor Davis. The opinion of col Orton was that the fugitives had fled to Austin and he accordingly sent a party of men to that city in pursuit of them. Rumors were rife over the county, to the effect that the murderers had not actually fled the country, but were still secreting themselves in the county, and instigating the negroes to deeds of violence. Indeed so great had become the apprehensions of the white population of a negro insurrection that Col Orton in order to prevent bloodshed and quiet the fears of the whites, deemed it right and  expedient to disarm a considerable number of negroes, this he did as much for the protection of the negroes  themselves as for any other purpose. The negroes disarmed, were those accused of making some demonstration to that effect, viz: insurrection. This action on the part of Col Orton to a great extent alloyed the excitement of the community, and he disbanded his men. In a few days after the sheriff dismissed his posse, a lieutenant Williams of the State police force came from Austin to Linn Flat, bringing with him as prisoners Grayson and Hazlett. The lieutenant of police, offered to turn the prisoners over to Col Orton, but coupled several conditions to that offer. The conditions were as follows:

First, that their guards should be members of the Police Force, furnished by the lieutenant of the Police. Second, that the sheriff should give a receipt for the prisoners. These conditions, Col Orton refused to accept, because they reflected on his good faith, and the good faith or [of] his county, and further because they were not in accordance with the law. The law making the sheriff the legal custodian of all prisoners  legally committed to his custody and making him accountable for their safekeeping, tot he law and to the law alone. He being a constitutional officer, could not accept prisoners under such circumstances. The lieutenant would accept no other terms or conditions save those above mentioned. Col Orton then went to Rusk and prevailed on Judge Preist (then judge of that district) to come over to Linn Flat. This he did with a view to secure the peace by surrender of the prisoners and the vindication of the civil law. Judge Preist had at the time a letter in his possession from Gov Davis, requesting him to go to Linn Flat and investigate the condition of affairs. Judge Preiat on his arriving at Linn Flat, did all in his power to induce the lieutenant to turn the prisoners over to Sheriff Orton. This, that officer still refused to do. After three days spent in fruitless efforts, Judge Preist issued his warrant for the arrest of the lieutenant, guards, and prisoners, and placed it in the hands of the sheriff.

Owing to the lateness of the hour in which the warrants were handed to the sheriff, the number of police, and his not having a posse with him at that time, the police gained time to escape, and fled to Austin, taking Hazlett and Grayson with them. Shortly after this, State Adjutant General Davidson, Captain Martin, and some twenty-five or thirty police came to Linn Flat, bringing the prisoners, Grayson and Hazlett with them. General Davidson submitted the prisoners to the civil authorities, and an examining trial was had at Linn Flatt before Justice Dawson, the prisoners, Grayson and Hazlett were refused bail and committed to jail. Col Orton received them inside the jail door, in the town of Nacogdoches. There the civil law triumphed and quiet was again restored to the county. Grayson was afterward tried, and convicted of murder in the first degree, and sent to the penitentiary for life where he now is, paying the penalty of his crimes. Hazlett was sent to the county jail of Cherokee for safe-keeping, from which he escaped and fled to Arkansas, where he was afterwards killed in an attempt to arrest him for crimes committed in Texas.

Gov Richard Coke succeeded Gov Davis. Coke was elected by over 50,000 democratic majority. This was the end of the radical rule in Texas. R B Hubbard succeeded Coke to the gubernatorial chair, and held the office of governor from 1876 to 1878. O M Roberts was elected governor in 1878, and is at this time (1880) governor of Texas.

“Constable John Birdwell, 59, was survived by his wife and 10 children.”

 

 

Parents:
John Birdwell (1770 – 1854)
Mary Allen Birdwell (1780 – 1840)

Children:
Elizabeth Jane Weatherby Birdwell. Gray (1846 – 1915)*

Marilla Jane Birdwell 1855-1887

William J Birdwell 1859-1910

Mary Elizabeth Birdwell Shirley 1862-1937

Siblings:
Nancy Birdwell Romine (1795 – 1885)*
Moses Birdwell (1796 – 1832)*
Sarah H. Birdwell Isbell (1799 – 1876)*
Elizabeth Birdwell Isbell Conway (1800 – 1872)*
Allen B. Birdwell (1802 – 1893)*
Lucinda Birdwell Vaught (1812 – 1873)*
John Birdwell (1812 – 1871)

 

It is a southern saying that “It is a rich man’s war…

but a poor man’s fight.” That seems to bear out as truth in most, if not all, wars that our nation has been involved in. The north has always tried to beat the south down by saying that the War for Southern Independence was about slavery. Hogwash.

The writings of the soldiers of the south that I have been privileged to read all make such an assertion into hogwash. Slavery was only introduced into the war at the behest of Abraham Lincoln at a point in the long and weary war that he seemed to be on the brink of losing his cause. Additionally, it was initiated at the point when his soldiers were weary of the fight, and were not willing to fight any longer. Even the textbooks list Abraham Lincoln has the 16th President which is false as far as the south is concerned. Abraham Lincoln was never President of the states who seceded, which included Alabama. The President at that time and place was Jefferson Davis. They are so persistent in changing our history. But the rebels have been a little stronger in not allowing that to happen, yet.

The War for Southern Independence, or the Civil War as Yankees call it, caused a lot of loss of life and treasure, but it was fought over taxes. Mrs. Maness, a history professor – the best history professor, at the University of North Alabama taught about the era of history of that time. A test question that was more often missed was what caused the Civil War. The indoctrinated answer who be ‘slavery’ and that answer would have been wrong. The soldiers of the south would almost with one hundred percent agreement also state that ‘state’s rights’ were an even stronger reason that tied into the ‘taxes’ prompt.

Below is an article from a newspaper that spells this out as clearly as could be explained.

confederate letter

 

You see, the folks of the south knew a thing or two about government, and they never trusted the gubment from the gitgo. And each and everyone of them knew that every war was started by and for the rich, and the poor man was the soldier risking his guts and glory. The southerns also knew a thing or two about different forms of government, especially since about a hundred years earlier their fathers had fought against King George over a surtax placed on their one indulgence, tea. That started the battle for independence from an oppressive government and they would not stand for that every again.

Forms of Government are much easier to understand than the international globalists would want you to believe. THEY try to distract you from the IMPORTANT issues with celebrity gossip and NON-issues. The Truth remains simple; the difference is simply WHO or WHAT “rules”.

The USA is a “Constitutional Republic”, which is the most FREE and secure form of government. Historically, Republics have been downgraded to greedy democracies, hostile anarchies, and are finally ruled by dictators under an oligarchy.

Anarchy: Chaos; Ruled by Nobody

Republic: Rule of Law; Constitution

Democracy: Majority Rules

Oligarchy: Ruled by Elite Group

Monarchy: Ruled by King or Queen

A 1930 Isbell family reunion photo…

shows descendants of Levi Isbell at the 1930 family reunion at the Isbell home on Main Street, Albertville, Alabama. The home was later demolished but stood on the court house square across the street from the court house. Levi Isbell was the brother of our James Isbell. Levi Isbell married Sarah “Sallie” Birdwell and James Isbell married her sister Elizabeth Birdwell. James and Elizabeth Isbell are my third great-grandparents on my Murray line. The Murrays who married Isbells moved from around Paint Rock and Larkinsville in Jackson County, Alabama sometime between 1865-1870 to Colbert County, then Franklin County, Alabama.

1930 Isbell Reunion at home of Levi Isbell

Peebles and Box family photos

This photo montage of Box and Peebles family members is wonderful.

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