The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Posts tagged “Sam B Barron

Sometime inlaws are outlaws…

or something to that effect.

Samuel Boulds Barron who was born  16 Oct 1808 in Greene County, Georgia and died 8 June 1886 in Nacogdoches, Nocogdoches, Texas married Phoebe C Barber born 1818 and died 1900. They had a number of children. Their known chidlren are:Sarah Elizabeth Barron 1838–1924, Mahala Ann Barron 1843–1910, Samuel B Barron 1844–1932, Tillitha Barron born 1845, J T Barron 1845–1880, Phineas Barron 1854–1939, Marcus LaFayette Fate Barron 1857–194, Louisa J Barron 1859–1891.

While Samuel B Barron have descendants that were residents and natives of the Shoals area, it is Samuel Boulds Barron’s daughter Mahala Ann Barron who married William Wilson Walker that is of interest at present.With all the bravery in the Revolutionary War, the Indian Wars, the War of Northern Aggression, and the Vietnam Conflict that Barron men fought in and Barron wives and families suffered through, it is the infamous that seem to catch interest.

Mahala Ann Barron was born about 1843 in Nacogdoches, Texas. Her parents were Samuel Boulds Barron and Phoebe C Barber. She married William Wilson “W.W.” Walker on March 18, 1886. They divorced on March 24, 1910.

They had several children:

Charles Samuel Walker (1866 – 1956)
Mary Elizabeth Walker Toms (1869 – 1930)
Susan “Susie” Virginia Walker Muckleroy (1876 – 1966)
Belle Zora Walker Briggs (1879 – 1962)
Walter Willis Walker (1880 – 1960)
Cumie Talitha Walker Barrow (1874 – 1942)
William Alexander Walker

Mahala Ann Barron Walker had a daughter named Cumie Talitha Walker. She was born 21 Nov 1874 in Nacogdoches, Texas. Cumie Talitha had siblings by the names of Charles Walker and Mary Elizabeth Waker Toms. Cumie Talitha Walker married Henry Basil Barrow. Cumie Talitha Walker Barrow died 14 Aug 1942 om Dallas, Texas.

Henry Basil Barrow and Cumie Talitha Walker were the parents of Elvin Wilson Barrow, Artie Adelle Barrow Keys, Marvin Ivan Barrow Sr, Nellie May Barrow Francis, Leon C Barrow, and Lillian Marie Barrow Scoma. And, they were the parents of Clyde Chestnut Barrow.

Clyde Chestnut Barrow was born on 24 March 1909, in Telico, Texas. He was the fifth of seven children born into a family lacking in worldly  riches but a close-knit farming family. His family’s farm failed due to drought and they eventually moved to Dallas, Texas. Clyde Chestnut Barrow, who was a small and unassuming boy, attended school until the age of 16 and had ambitions of becoming a musician, learning to play both the guitar and saxophone.

However, under the influence of his older brother, Buck, Clyde soon turned to a life of crime. Beginning with petty thievery, then graduating to stealing cars, Clyde soon escalated his activities to armed robbery. By late 1929, at the age of 20, Clyde was already a fugitive from the law, wanted by authorities for several robberies.

And then he joined with Bonnie.

Bonnie and Clyde

In January 1930, Clyde met a 19-year-old waitress named Bonnie Parker through a mutual friend and was immediately smitten. But after spending much time together during the following weeks, their budding romance was interrupted when Clyde was arrested and convicted on various counts of auto theft.

Once in prison, Clyde’s thoughts turned to escape. By this time, he and Bonnie had fallen deeply in love, and Clyde was overtaken by heartache. Sharing his sentiments, much to the dismay of her mother, a lovesick Bonnie was more than willing to help the man she called her soulmate, and soon after his conviction she smuggled a gun into the prison for him. On March 11, 1930, Clyde used the weapon to escape with his cellmates, but they were captured a week later. Clyde was then sentenced to 14 years of hard labor, eventually being transferred to Eastham State Farm, where he was repeatedly sexually assaulted by another inmate.

While Clyde was serving his sentence, he and Bonnie began a passionate correspondence with each other, and once again, Clyde’s thoughts turned to escape. Hoping to be relieved of his grueling work detail and paroled, Clyde had his big toe and part of another toe cut off in an “accident.’ (As a result, he would walk with a permanent limp and be forced to drive in his socks.) Unbeknownst to Clyde, his desperate scheme was unnecessary—his mother had already convinced the judge in his case to grant him parole. He was released two weeks later, in February 1932. Source: Clyde Barrow Biography.com

It did not end well for Bonnie and Clyde, even when the shootout happened and they were killed, they were so famous that souvenir seekers ravaged the scene, cutting one of Clyde’s ears for a take home souvenir. They wanted to be buried together or side by side, but their wish was not granted as they were buried separately.

Advertisements

I don’t know if this is good or bad…

so I will let the reader decide. I can tell you that it really disturbed me. And to think this is what they came to…after surviving a war like none other in the land we love.

There will be an attachment to this post below. There are 67 people, some women, who are considered inmates after a life of honor. They lived to an age that many would pray for, but I am not sure I would be at all happy with their life situation.

In searching for information on Samuel B Barron a Confederate who was born in Chambers County, Alabama  and should have died in Alabama, but instead he died in Austin, Travis County, Texas. He died in the Men’s Confederate (Soldier’s) Home at 5:20 am to be exact on 28 February 1932. He was 87 years 4 months 24 days old. It appears that an official at the Old Soldier’s Home was the informant for the death certificate. The facility housed Civil War (southerners call it the War Between the States or the War of Northern Aggression) soldiers, and some wives, along with staff and workers. On Samuel Barron’s death certificate it provided the information that he died in the old soldier’s home of septic pneumonia. He was there 2 long years, two months and 20 days before his life ended. He is buried in the State Cemetery in Travis County, Texas.

There was an old soldier’s home in south Alabama, so I am aghast as to why so many of our elderly Confederate soldiers were shipped away from any home they knew and placed as inmates into what would have to seem like a prison. That question is for research on another day. This 1930 census of the inmates and workers, and wives is a sweet little piece of history to have stumbled upon. It gives the age of the person when they first married. It gives their age at the time of the census. It provides their marital status, and in some cases their spouses are living in the same room with the soldier. It tell us where the soldier was born, where their father was born, and where they mother was born. That is quite a lot of information that would have gone unoticed but for serendipity.

Below is an account of those 67 souls who were confined at the Men’s Confederate Home for Retired Confederate soldiers in Justice #3, District # 30 , Block#1600 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. Some of the names seem so familiar. Are there ancestors of yours among the inmates?

The information is there, I promise. I am not able to add media or tags so I did a workaround. Press the link below and it will take you to the pdf. Then press the link that reads 1930 Confederate Men’s Home. It is close enough to government work for me…this late at night. I hope you find your long lost ancestors on the list of 67 names.

https://rememberingtheshoals.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=6086