The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Tishomngo, does that name sound familiar?

Captain Tisho Mingo

Captain Tisho Mingo was a veteran warrior of the Choctaw, departed this life on the 5th inst. Although but little known beyond the limits of his nation, yet he was a man that has seen wars and fought battles—stood high among his own people as a brave and good man. He served under General Wayne in the Revolutionary War, for which he received a pension from the Government of the United States; and in the late war with England, he served under General Jackson, and did many deeds of valor. He had fought in nine battles of the United States. As a friend he has served the white man faithfully. His last words were: “When I am gone, beat the drum and fire the guns.”

 

  I hear the sound of the drum—the report of “death guns” is roaring in our valley—a warrior’s spirit is passing away. The brave Tisho Mingo, the veteran warrior of our tribe, is gone! His clansmen are gathering around the corpse. Long years have passed since first his native hills re-echoed his war-hoop—when grey-headed warriors gathered around his war dance, and said, “Go, young warrior, go—It is beloved Washington who calls for help.” Our aged warrior and chieftains are all gone. Tisho Mingo, the last of the brave, is gone! They are all gone!—Tuscaloosa Flag of the Union, June 30, 1841.Source: Thomas McAdory Owen’s Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama, Alabama Department of Archives.

 

 

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