The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Posts tagged “hero

Game over…

he and his partner have already won. Everybody else can go home now.

Noah Galloway and his partner Sharna Burgess have won this season’s Dancing With the Stars. If there was any remaining doubt, tonight’s performance puts that doubt to rest. Noah is an Alabama boy, a handsome and brave Alabama boy, who lost both limbs on his right side during the current wars. He is brave beyond belief and he gives an account of his story in this episode of DWTS.

Why the judges only gave scores of 8 is mindblowing to me, other than to maybe give the other contestants a little morale boost. They deserved scores of 20, at least. If you are an Alabamian, if you are an American,if you are a veteran, if you know a veteran, if you love veteran,  if you are a patriot, if you have had a wound to your body or a wound to your soul, if you applaud this soldier’s determination and willpower, if you applaud his partner Sharna Burgess’ ability to work around his disabilities,  if you have half a heart, then you will support this patriot with your vote on DWTS. Nothing less will suffice. They have already won….they just need your votes to make them the final winner on this show and for America.

Stand up, Alabama.

Stand up, America.

Testify with  your vote.

And share his story with your kids, as they can conquer their fears and hard knocks just like this real southern born and cornbread fed Alabama boy has…and with aplomb.

http://www.westernjournalism.com/watch-what-americas-awe-inspiring-super-hero-just-did-on-dancing-moved-the-stars/


Hello Soldier, I am your brother…

Hillard and this is our little sister Alice.

Somehow it was always Alice who got into trouble, perhaps it was because Hillard just wouldn’t agree to punishment. Alice was in charge of seeing that her young brother got home in a timely manner from school – and herself for that matter. That must not have been an easy task because so much seemed to peak his interest. That particular afternoon the  trek home from the schools across town seemed particularly harrowing for Alice.

Hillard MurrayShe recounted the story of that afternoon and it seemed a movie was playing in her head as she relived the events of that unforgettable day. It was a day in early September of 1945. She was but nine years old, or almost for her birthday was in December. She was exasperated with her brother because she was sure that he would get her into trouble with his lollygagging.  After all the past is prologue.

Something had caught her brother’s attention further down the sidewalk in downtown Sheffield that particular day. He hurried to the store down the street.  I am sure she must have tapped those little feet and let out a few breaths of aggravation as she insisted that they go on down the road toward home; he refused to budge. Hillard later said it was a soldier with an Army duffel bag going down the street and then into the store.

When they reached the grocery store just a few blocks before the train tracks, Hillard stopped dead in his tracks. His little nose was pressed against the windowpane of the storefront window. Alice must have thought aloud and asked, what now?

World War II had just ended. Then, Alice noticed there was a soldier in there. The soldier was drinking a Coke. Alice noticed Hillard’s gaze go up to the soldier’s mouth  (and his little nose go up on the windowpane) as the soldier lifted the Coke bottle to his mouth, and then down as he lowered the bottle and its precious contents to the table again. Again. Again. And again. Alice nagged at him to come on,  let’s go home; but to him she was all but  invisible. All that mattered was that Coke bottle and the path it took from table to mouth, from mouth to table.

But then, she noticed something else. Maybe it was the soldier’s gold tooth that had her brother in awe of the young man in uniform. Not that the little boy and girl were not patriotic, but a Coke was a rare and precious commodity, and so was a gold tooth – a real genuine gold tooth. Gasp.

Of a sudden the little boy bounded forward and entered the store. She was caught unaware. She fumed as she considered that Hillard might have a nickel in his pocket. A nickel would buy a Coke, but just one.  She steamed that, dern, she didn’t know where he would get them but it seemed that Hillard always had a nickel in his pocket. A child with a nickel was exceedingly rare in those hard times that came on the heels of the Great Depression and a world war that had just ended. So, she drug her feet and went in after him hoping that he would just come on home with her and before she was to get into trouble because of his precociousness.

After entering the store, her brother continued to watch every move that the soldier made; every breath the soldier took. I insert here that I can all but tell you what happened next. That soldier asked the little boy, “What are you doing, Jabbo?”  The little boy was watching the soldier’s every breath; the sister was watching what would without a doubt be the little brother’s last breath. That was a certainty and an all but done deal.

Her brother made a query of the object of his intense study. He asked, “What is your name soldier?” The soldier answered, “James Murray.” The little boy said, “Soldier, I am your brother Hillard and this is our little sister, Alice.” Now, anyone with one eye and half-sense could predict what was to happen next.

Little brother and sister remembered for a lifetime the thrill of that day. Their mother had died when Alice was just a little girl and Hillard not much older. James Murray was but fifteen and the oldest child when his mother died. There was another brother, Ed Lee, who was the second oldest child.

Hillard and Alice recalled that their brother got them a taxi cab and they went shopping. Hillard and Alice recounted that, “He bought us everything.” Hillard stated about the day and the length of time it took to get home from that point that James must have known everybody in the town. It must have seemed like the whole entire town talked to and welcomed their big brother back home.  I don’t think anyone got in trouble that day for getting home late from school. To this day Hillard states that James was his hero. Much too late to ever tell him, I discover he is my hero, too.


My hero…

 is Chad Peebles. Chad is the son of Anthony and Nikki Peebles and is currently serving in the military as a Marine. Pam Doyle arranged for his flight home for Christmas, which was a surprise to some of Chad’s family. Thank you, Pam Doyle. Chad is one of the brave and patriotic young people serving in the defense of freedom overseas. Chad’s Dad,

Chad Peebles, My Hero!

Chad Peebles, My Hero!

Anthony Peebles served in the military and was sent to Grenada. Whenever we pass a soldier, sailor, marine, airman, or Coast Guard, let’s thank them for their service. For years now, whenever I encounter someone in uniform I say to them, “You are my hero.” It always brings a smile and that brightens my day.

The soldier above all others prays for peace, for it is the soldier who must suffer and bear the deepest wounds and scars of war. –Douglas MacArthur

How many ‘heroes’ are associated with Sheffield, Alabama? Honor them with a comment letting others have the chance to honor their service.

Scroll to below the video for links that may be of interest.

Related: