The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Posts tagged “Christmas

Do you know how you tell a good guy from a bad guy?

The good guy always wears the white hat. The bad guy always wears the black hat. Simple. Nothing to it. Life was so simple back in 1956. Life was good in Sheffield Alabama in 1956; Norman Rockwell-esque, really. In December there was the gIANt Santa on the Y and holiday lights that made visions of  Christmas dance in the little ones heads. And the good guy always wore the white hat. Always. But not to worry, the guy in the white hat had paid a visit to the Vengrouskie household on Annapolis Avenue in Sheffield.

I find this Tri-Cities Daily article hilarious. Funny because I can envision Big Joe’s reaction. Funny because I envision Little Joe’s reaction. And even funnier because I can envision Pauline’s reaction. Pauline would be nervous and would run to the phone to tell Irene, her twin, all about it. I can just hear, “Ohhh, Joe is going to kill me!” She would hurry to try to think of something to do. Bet you there was a lot of hand wringing going on.

The article posted here was published in the local newspaper on 1 December 1956. Since someone in the class of ’57 still remembers it, don’t worry I won’t reveal who you are Mr. Vetters, it must have been h-i-l-a-r-i-o-u-s. Having known the Vengrouskie’s for many years I can just imagine how hilarious Little Joe and Big Joe may have thought it.

And, oh, the class of ’57 had its dreams! Do you think that any one of them ever dreamed that as a freshman, s/he would look out his/her window to find a real cowboy (I hope he wore a white hat) delivering a five hundred pound steer to his/her home in a downtown residential area? It had to have violated a whole slue of city ordinances, if not they were likely created after this incident by the bundles. I wonder who fed and cleaned up after the steer and who shoveled the-you-know-what.

That Pauline, you gotta love her, and I did. She was a delight to be around and she never met a stranger. I was blessed to have Pauline Vengrouskie and Irene Marks as guests at my home with my family at what would be Pauline’s last Christmas. Irene and I talked about that as I stayed with her to allow more immediate kin to attend Pauline’s funeral.

QED

Pauline, you gotta love her!


What is the difference between a wooden pencil and a nice fountain pen?

The difference is huge to the child receiving the gift of the wooden pencils while their sister receives the nice fountain pens. Huge. The same is true with broken dolls for the twin of the favored grandchild.

Catherine E Ruth Jones Kerby has been so elusive, but finally we found a photo of her. The story of the  pens and

Grandmother Ruth Kerby

pencils and porcelain dolls follows as great-great-grandchild, Kimberly Ricketts recounts the story told of Grandmother Ruth Kerby:

My Great-Aunts (twins Irene and Pauline) told a story about “Grandmother Kerby” and the Christmas dolls. Andrew, Ruth’s son, (my G-Grandfather) had a stroke when he was still a young man which made it hard for him to make a living for his family.

He was a painter by trade (Wagon Works in Florence had him listed as an employee – even though the girls never remembered him working there) and did some gardening and painting, but after his stroke around 1909 (in TX) he was forced to relocate back to his “home” near his family.

Andrew’s wife, Minnie, was pregnant with the twins during their journey back home. Apparently, Richard Marshall Kerby and his wife Ruth gave Andrew’s family their previous home (they had lived there on Trade Street since about 1883.) Back then families took care of each other the best they could.

Grandmother Ruth, according to the twins and my grandmother, was snobby and thought she was better than Minnie’s family. She would get on to Pauline for playing and eating turnips in the garden with “little negro” neighbors. She told them they were “blue – blood” and should keep themselves neat and proper at all times.

She would make a difference between the twins and Minnie didn’t appreciate it. She would mail the kids gifts and would always send Irene the nicest gift. Irene was her favorite (Pauline explained to me when she was in her nineties, that Irene was a “suck up” when it came to Grandmother Kerby.)

When their grandfather died Grandmother Ruth left Florence, AL to live with a daughter in Warrior, AL. She would continue to send Irene nice fountain pens, while sending Pauline wooden pencils. One Christmas Grandmother sent all of the children gifts that were wrapped and tagged neatly.

Pauline decided that even though she couldn’t see the gifts she knew Irene’s was the nicest. So, she switched the name tags on their gifts. Much to Irene’s chagrin on Christmas she opened a doll that had a flat head and crooked eyes. Pauline of course opened a beautiful doll with eyes that opened and closed. Pauline’s doll had a beautifully shaped head and was much superior to the doll Irene had received.

Later that year Grandmother Kerby came to visit. The twins would imitate the “blue-blood” attitude that Grandmother exuded when telling this story. Irene remembered her coming into town in a wagon. After Grandmother got settled, she asked all of the girls to get out the dolls she had sent them. She was going to inspect them to see if they had taken good care of them. If they were in perfect shape, Grandmother told them, “she had brought some beautiful cloth to make their dolls a dress.”

Grandmother was mortified when Irene ran to bring her doll to her. Grandmother says, “Irene this is not YOUR doll, this is Pauline’s.” Pauline and Irene’s mother,Minnie, stepped in and told her that if she couldn’t get them the same gifts, then she should get them nothing at all.

All my life I will never forget the twins different versions of this story. Each Christmas I asked the twins to tell us all the story of Grandmother Kerby and the Christmas dolls.

 Pauline and Irene Kerby were born in 1910, so they would have no memory of their father’s work at the Wagon Factory if the date of his stroke is correct at 1909.