The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Tuscumbia

Rubber biscuit…

sweet potato pie, and hush my mouth – these boys are from the south! Their mama must be sooooo proud. May I add, and they are on a MISSION OF FUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN!

Justin Crisler who protrays Elwood and Jamey Crisler who portrays Jake, are the Blues Brothers – Alabama style that is. The Alabama Blues Brothers are a performing tribute group that flatters the Belushi/Akroyd team from the 80s movie by the name of The Blues Brothers. They know Redneckology and Redneckism and they originate from Town Creek, Alabama. Ah, Sweet Home Alabama.

They dress the part. They look the part. And they perform the part with excellence. Jake even does cartwheels. The band comes  out appropriately dressed in convict jumpsuits; they are from Tampa Florida, Hartselle, Town Creek, Arab and Huntsville Alabama. This is a fun show and well worth more than the cost of admission. There is a lot of audience participation and they even occasionally polish a bald head in the audience. The dance routines were energetic and very much on par with the original Jake and Elwood performances.

Alabama Blues Brothers

Justin and Jamey Crisler’s family originates overseas. Their earliest known ancestor is Mathias Crisler born 1664 in Bresleu, Schlesien, Germany and died  1759 in what is now Madison, Madison, Virginia. Some researcher give Mathhias Crisler birthplace as Switzerland. Mathias Crisler married fifteen-year-old Barbara Von DerSchellenberg in 1687. Barbara was born about 1667 in Allenstein, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. Barbara Crisler died Oct 1709 onboard the vessel Swift while at sea between Rotterdam, Pennsylvania. She possibly died during or shortly after childbirth judging by the birthdate of her youngest child.

Matthias and Barbara Crisler had a large family of children: Catherine Christler, Elizabeth Christler, John G Chrisler, Mary Christler, Leonhard Christler 1686 – 1746, Fawatt Chrisler 1700 – 1759, David Crisler, 1703 – 1755, Michael Crisler 1705 – 1759, and Theobold Fawatt Crisler 1709 – 1776.

They came to America! The main passenger listed on the mandate was Matthias Crisler and he and his relatives arrived in Virginia in the year 1734. 1734 was the date of arrival at the colony at Germanna, Virginia. In 1725 the entire colony moved to the Robinson River near the foot of the Blue Mountains, in present Madison County, Virginia. The group is known historically as The German Colony.

Son Leonhard Christler was born 1686 in  Canton, Bern, Switzerland  and died  1746 in Franconia Township, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Lenhard Crisler married Anna Maria Bender in Lambsheim, Ludwigshafen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany in 1708; he was twenty-two years old.  In 1719 the main port of arrival was Pennsylvania for Leonard and Anna Maria Bender. obviously since Anna Maria Crisler came to America in 1719, it is unlikely that she died overseas.

Leonard and Anna Maria Crisler had nine known children: Johann Theobald Crisler 1709 – 1776, Tosanus Christler 1713 –   , Anna Ursula Eichelberger 1715 – 1780, Johannes Paulus Eichelberger 1717 – 1717, Christianus Christler 1717 –  , Anna Catharina Eichelberger 1718 – 1721, and Maria Eva Eichelberger 1720 –  . Perhaps family members can provide an explanation of why some of the children are listed with surnames of Eichelberger; seems an awful lot like where they were born in Eschelbach, Hohenlohekreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany to me. Anna Maria Bender’s parents were Johann Kaspar Bender 1672 – 1741 and Anna Helena Eschelbacher 1656 – 1706. Perhaps the  Eichelberger children are not Anna Maria’s; they are her children by a marriage to an Eichelberger, or they were named her maiden name. There seems no space of time for a first marriage for Anna Maria Bender. Researchers link those children to Leonard and Anna Maria Crisler as their parents. Could the researchers be wrong?

Another possibility is that they are Anna Maria Bender’s siblings. Anna Maria Bender was born to parents Johannes Kasper Bender born 24 Feb 1672 and died 29 Aug 1741 Eschelbach, Hohenlohekreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany while her mother Anna Helena Eschelbacherwas born  1 Dec 1656 in Hanau, Main-Kinzig-Kreis, Hessen, Germany and died 1706 in Eschelbach, Hohenlohekreis, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany.

The children of Johannes Kasper and Anna Helena Bender are named by researchers as: Maria Eva Bender1670 – 1670, Ursula Bender 1679 – 1754, Anna Katharina Bender 1680 – 1734, Johann Michael Bender 1681 –  , Anna Catharina Brucher 1682 – 1749, Margaretha Bender 1683 –  ,Claus Bender 1684 –  , Anna Maria Bender 1685 – 1723, Anna Catharina Bender 1690 – 1764, Johann Christian Bender 1695 – 1755, and Anna Catharina Brucher 1698 – 1760. Readily evident is that researchers either do not agree on the children, or there was more than one child with the same name. In the early days when the infant mortality rate was high, parents would name children the same name to ensure that the legacy of a family name was preserved.

Leonard and Anna Maria Crisler’s son Johann Theobald Crisler, called Theobald, was born 18 Aug 1709 (one record listed birth as 1700) in Lambsheim, Ludwigshafen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany and died 20 Feb 1776 in Culpepper, Virginia which is now Madison County, Virginia. He married Rosina Gaar who was born 11 Aug 1713 in Illenschwang, Ansbach, Bayern, Germany and whose death 1778 occurred in Madison, Madison, Virginia. They married in Culpepper, Virginia  in 1736. The Gaar family is a fascinating history. Johann T Crisler arrived in America in the year 1734. Theobodt Fawatt Crisler served in the Revolutionary War, his wife was Rosina Gar. So, evidently the name was Johannes Theobolt Fawatt Crisler. Descendants would be eligible to join the DAR from this record.

The children of Johannes Theobald and Rosina Crisler were: Dorothea Christler 1735 – 1777, John George Cryesler Crisler 1738 – 1818, Leonard Crisler 1745 – 1824 who died in Kentucky and left a large family of children, Margaret Crisler 1748 – 1835, Andrew Crisler 1750 –  , Elizabeth Crisler 1750 – 1807,  and Michael Crisler 1752 – 1836.

Way back then, the people of arrived in America were proud to become citizens. They were required to go through denization processes and naturalization processes. Often these processes took years. The denization or naturalization often did not take place for years or in their native state. But, for Theobald and Leonhard Crisler this was not true. Denization and Naturalization records show that Theobald Christle was naturalized in Orange County, Virginia on 28 January 1742 and the process evidently went into the following year o f 1743. The records show that Leonhart Christler was naturalized in Pennsylvania on 19 March 1739 and was from Philadelphia.

Son John George Cryesler Crisler 1738 – 1818 married Anna Magdalene Smith 1747 – 1824 in 1766 or 1767 in Culpepper, Virginia. There is one record that shows she died in Kentucky, he died in Culpepper, Virginia. Their known children were: Nancy Crisler 1759 – 1764, Julius Crisler 1767 – 1833, Elizabeth Crisler 1769 – 1844, Abraham Cristler 1771 – 1795, Benjamin Crisler 1773 – 1780, Absolom Crisler 1775 – 1854, Rosina Crisler 1778 – 1804, Joel Crisler 1780 – 1781, Julianna Cristler 1781 – 1863, Susanna Crisler 1783 – 1859, Jonas Crisler 1785 – 1858, Lucy Crisler 1787 – 1850, Anna Crisler 1790 – 1791, Mary Crisler 1792 – 1866,  and Abram Crisler 1803 – 1894.

There are generations yet to go before we get to present day Crislers, so hang in there. Son of John George and Anna Magdalen Smith,  Absolom Crisler, was born  1775  and died 1854. His wife, Anna Souther, was born  1778 and died a year earlier in 1853. Absolom Crisler was born in Culpepper, Virginia and died in Jackson County, Georgia. They were married 31 August 1801 in Madison County, Virginia. Their children were: Nancy Crisler 1802 – 1865, Abram Crisler 1803 – 1894, Jonathon Crisler 1806 – 1885, Absolem Christler 1807 – , Mary Smith Christler 1809 – 1892, Polly Souther Crisler 1809 – 1890, Joel Souther Crisler 1811 – 1853, Rosanna Crisler 1814 – 1865, Jeptha Smith Crisler 1816 – 1854, and Addison Crisler 1820 – 1892. For those interested in further research, the children’s names give clues as to ancestors.

An abstract of Absalom Crisler yield further information. Absalom Crisler, of advanced age provides for in his will of 3/14/1853 : 4/3/1854 for his wife of 50 years Anna; for the children of his deceased son  Joel S.; and for the minor children of deceased daughter Rosanna Dunson. The Executors were his son Jeptha S. Crisler and  his friend H. A. Bennett. Witnesses to the will were E. D. Yarborough, Seaborn M. Shankle, and W. M. Hunter. Often there are family connections to those associated with a will or a marriage license.

Son of Absolom and Anna Magdalene Crisler, Abram Crisler, was born 6 November 1803 in Georgia  and died 1894 in Town Creek, Lawrence County, Alabama. Abram has also been recorded as Abraham Crisler. Abram Crisler married Lucretia Jane “Lucy Jane” Howell  who was born 28 March 1820 in either Georgia or North Carolina and died in 1903 in Lawrence County, Alabama. Abram and Lucretia Jane married 3 Feb 1746 in Randolph County, Alabama. Abram lived in Jackson County Georgia, Cleburne County Alabama, Randolph County Alabama, and Lawrence County Alabama. He was buried in the A S Crisler Cemetery in Jackson County, Georgia according to one researcher; that cemetery could not be located by this researcher.

Of interest is Abram Crisler’s military service. He enlisted at age 57 and fought in Battle of Shiloh. He and a George A Crisler were both ranked as Privates on enlistment into the 22nd Alabama Infantry Regiment; both belonged to Company D. Abram Crisler  was invalidated out due to his age. The 22nd Infantry Regiment completed its organization at Montogmery, Alabama, in November, 1861, then moved to Mobile. Its companies were raised in the counties of Walker, Clarke, Cherokee, Mobile, Pike, Choctaw, Montgomery, Calhoun, and Randolph. The unit suffered severe losses at Shiloh under General Gladden, then saw action in Bragg’s Kentucky Campaign under General Gardner. Later the 22nd was attached to Deas’, G.D. Johnston’s, and Brantley’s Brigade, Army of Tennessee. It fought in many conflicts from Murfreesboro to Atlanta, was part of General Hood’s winter operations in Tennessee, and ended the war in North Carolina. After the Battle of Shiloh, the regiment reported only 123 men fit for duty. It sustained 94 casualties at Murfreesboro, and lost fifty-three percent of the 371 engaged at Chickamauga. In December, 1863, it totalled 272 men and 171 arms. It reported 5 killed and 35 wounded in the fight at Ezra Church; many were also disabled at Franklin and Nashville. The regiment was included in the surrender on April 26, 1865. Its field officers were Colonels Zach C. Deas, B.R. Hart, John C. Marrast, and Harry T. Houlmin; Lieutenant Colonels E. Herbert Armistead, Napoleon B. Rouse, and John Weedon; and Majors Robert B. Armistead, Robert Donnell, and T.M. Prince. Abram Crisler’s displeasure with Reconstruction prompted him to relocate; he sold his farm and went to live in the wilderness between Hatton and Town Creek.

The children of Abram S and Lucretia Jane Crisler were: Ellender Malinda Crisler 1846 – 1927, Nancy Love Crisler 1848 – 1873, Anna Souther Crisler 1851 – 1899, Absalom Milton Crisler 1854 – 1915 or 1940, Cynthia Ann Crisler 1856 – 1934, Eli Pickens Crisler 1860 –  , William Crisler 1868 – 1915, Cynthia Ann Christler 1874 –  , and William Addison Christler 1886 –  .

 Abram and Lucretia Crisler’s son, Absalom Milton Crisler, was born 2 Jan 1854 in Randolph County, Alabama and died Absalom Milton Crisler26 Jul 1940 in Town Creek, Lawrence County, Alabama.  He married Martha Elizabeth Burden 25 Feb 1861 and died  5 Jan 1932 in Lawrence County, Alabama. They married 30 April 1878 in Lawrence County, likely in Town Creek. Their children were: Mary Naomi Crisler 1879 – 1953, Eliza Jane Crisler 1883 – 1955, Cynthia Ella Crisler 1885 – 1926, John Hiram Crisler 1887 – 1966, Julia Ann Crisler 1890 – 1980, Absalom Benjamin Crisler 1892 – 1983, Walter Sherman Crisler 1895 – 1981, Samuel Ralph Chrisler 1897 –    , and Arthur Hurley Crisler 1900 – 1992.
 
Absolom Milton and Martha Elizabeth Burden Crisler’s son, Walter Sherman Crisler, was born 31 Jan 1895 and died 25 Mar 1981 in Town Creek, Lawrence County, Alabama.  On his 5 June 1917 registration card for World War I the following information is given: born 31 January 1895 in Lawrence County Alabama, if a farmer for himself, is described as short with medium build with blue eyes and black hair, he reports he has pain in his left side; has a wife and one child dependent upon him.
 Martha Elizabeth Burden Crisler
Walter Sherman Crisler married first on 20 December 1914 to Dottie Leigh Lansdell. They had the following children: Harold Grady Crisler 1916 – 1985, Fred Crisler 1918 – 2003, Haskell W Crisler 1921 – 1987, Clifton C Crisler 1922 – 2008, Clementine Crisler Scoggin Smith 1925 –  2006  , Flossy Fay Crisler Gibson 1927 – 2008, Betty Theola Crisler 1930 – 2000, and Martha Leigh Crisler 1933 – 1984.
 
Walter Sherman Crisler married secondly to Maggie Lena Peebles who was born 4 Jun 1904 in Tennessee and died 16 Jul 1993 at Oakcrest Nursing Home in Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama. The text of her obituary follows:
TIMES DAILY newspaper published  July 17, 1993 Maggie L. Crisler
TUSCUMBIA — Maggie Lena Crisler, 89, Oak Crest Nursing Home, formerly of Town Creek, died Friday, July 16, 1993, at Medical City Shoals, Muscle Shoals.
She was a native of Tennessee, housewife, and the daughter of the late Dan and Lula Peebles.The funeral will be at 2 p.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, Town Creek, with the Revs. Redmond Talley and Ed Marston officiating. Burial will be in Elmwood Cemetery.Visitation will be 6-9 p.m. today at the funeral home. The body will be placed in the church one hour before the service.Survivors include sons, Ussery Crisler, Billy Crisler, Greer Crisler, Sherman Crisler, Clifton Crisler, all of Town Creek, Fred Crisler, Memphis, Tenn.; daughters, Patricia Cleveland, Moulton, Betty Cross, Town Creek, Hazel Gray, Sheffield, Betty Huddleston, Mount Juliet, Tenn., Flossie Gibson, Decatur, Clementine Smith, Russellville; Margie Dell Brackin, Huntsville; grandchildren; great-grandchildren; great-great-grandchildren.Bearers will be Scotty Crisler, Jamie Crisler, Bradley Crisler, Ashley Crisler, Justin Crisler and Brian Anderton.
She is buried at Blackground Cemetery in Lawrence County, Alabama . Now, this is where I become very interested in these Crisler boys. Maggie Lena Peebles was the daughter of Edward DANiel and Lula Peebles. Dan Peebles was my mother’s Uncle Dan. Mother would often speak of her Uncle Dan and his family; there is a photo of him posted in an earlier article here on Remembering the Shoals. There are other family connections as well: Brackin,Burden,  Birdyshaw, and Terry to name a few. It is a small world after all. Maggie Peebles was first married to Thomas Gilbert Birdyshaw who was born 1898 and 1936 in Lawrence County, Alabama.  She had four Birdyshaw children.
 
Walter Sherman and Maggie Peebles Birdyshaw Crisler had four children. They are:  Patricia Ann Crisler, Sherman Edward Crisler, Franklin Greer Crisler,  Truman Ussery Crisler, and Billy Glenn Crisler. It is Billy Glenn Crisler that is the father of the now famous Jake and Elwood Blues Brothers. Billy Glenn and  Betty Jean Crisler are the parents of Justin, James, Robin Nicole, and Darrell Crisler if my info is correct.  Betty Jean’s maiden name is Terry. Don’t get me started about all the connections to the awesome Terry family of Lawrence County, Alabama.
 
Break a leg, Elwood and Jake and the boys in the band.
 

Remembering the Shoals

by Carolyn Murray Greer

 
 
 
 

They think they are doing good…

and they are. Their parents must be very proud of these youth. These seniors from Christian Covenant in Tuscumbia went to the Oak Grove Community and cleaned up some debris caused by the April 27th tornado caravan that swept death and destruction through six or seven states. 

The Oak Grove Community looks a little nicer now, thanks CC Seniors!


One of our best, most respected citizens…

is how Felix Grundy Norman has been described.

FELIX GRUNDY NORMAN, lawyer, was born January 4, 1808, near Smyrna, Rutherford County, Tenn. and died August 5, 1885 at Tuscumbia [Alabama]; son of John and Margaret [Stockird] Norman who lived at Smyrna. He is

Felix Grundy Norman

Felix Grundy Norman

 buried in Tuscumbia’s Oakwood Cemetery. He was denied early educational advantages, but was taught in the rudiments by an older brother. He began life as a merchant but later taught school for several years. He studied under William Casper, was admitted to the bar in Tuscumbia in the early thirties, and practiced at that point and the surrounding country until his death. He was mayor of Tuscumbia for many years, and represented his county in the legislature for sessions of 1841, 1842, 1844, 1845 and 1847-8, inclusive. Although he supported the Confederacy with his means and influence, he was debarred from active participation on account of his age. He was a Democrat; a Presbyterian; and a Mason. Married: August 17, 1848 at Dickson, to Jane Lavina, daughter of Henry and Jane [Shelton] Cook of Spotsylvania County, Va., residents for some years of Huntsville, later locating in Tuscumbia where they spent the remaining years of their lives, the former for some time government agent for the disposition of Indian lands. Children: 1. John Henry; 2. Felix Grundy, m. Della Phares, Salinas, Calif.; 3. Mary Barton, m. John R. Charlton, La Verge, Tenn.; 4. Kate Cook, m. Hall S. Kirkpatrick; 5. Thomas Edgar, m. Lee Ellis, Memphis; 6. James Beverly, last residence: Tuscumbia.Bibliography

Source: History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Vol. IV. by Thomas McAdory Owen, Chicago: S. J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1921.

   

Biography of Felix Grundy Norman, Sr., 1808-1885
FELIX G NORMAN, of Franklin [County Alabama], was born and educated in Tennessee. He represented Franklin for the first time at the session of 1841, and by continuous elections, he served in the House until the close of the session of 1847-8, since which time he has been in private life, engaged in the practice of law. While in the Legislature, Col. Norman was a very efficient member, both in debate and in Committees. He was a Democrat from honest conviction, and never departed from that faith, but always kept himself in the path of duty according to the best of his judgment. Acting on principle, he opposed at every step the resolutions of the General Assembly accepting Alabama’s portion of the proceeds of the public lands. In the same manner, he opposed what he considered the improper identity in the same resolution, on the Constitutional amendment providing for biennial sessions of the Legislature, and for the removal of the Seat of Government at the session of 1845. In all this, he only yielded to a sense of duty, to prevent injustice, or an unsafe precedent. However laudable his purpose, he course on the question of removal resulted to his injury, through influences subsequently brought to bear against him, in a political sense.
For many years, Col. Norman was Grand High Priest and Grand Master of the Masonic fraternity of Alabama, who presented him, on his retirement, appropriate medals, commemorating his services to the craft.
From his bearing in the Legislature, the courtesy he always exhibited in debate, the intelligence with which he handled questions, and the ease and graceful elocution which seemed natural to him, Col. Norman was unquestionably cast in a large intellectual mould, capable of expansion beyond the limits within which it was his fortune to be confined as a political aspirant. Although rigid in the tenets of his party, and at times somewhat acrimonious under provocation, he was not blind to the merits of a measure because it may have originated with his opponents. He was bold and fearless, often displaying the gallantry of ancient knighthood in the legislative arena, shivering a lance with friend or foe without personal malice. His face was luminous with good feeling, and his whole deportment was that of a gentleman sensible of the rights of others, and careful of his own, in all that relates to the substantial etiquette of life. Had his lot permitted a more congenial opening for the development of his character after the inward model, there is no doubt that Col. Norman would have filled a large space before the public, and achieved a reputation as proudly National as that which he now enjoys is, in local view, distinguished for ability and honor. Perhaps the greatest obstacle to his advancement to higher places has been a certain measure of self-respect and honorable sensibility, which made intrigue and management the usual medium of success repugnant to his nature. He has abundant reason, however to be satisfied with the result, in his own high and unimpeachable character. He is still in the meridian of life, and he resides in Tuscumbia.Bibliography
Source: Reminiscences of Public Men in Alabama, by William Garrett, Atlanta, GA: Plantation Publishing Press, 1872

A Tribute to
Felix Grundy Norman Sr.
1808 – 1885
A MAYOR of Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama
A LEGISLATURE, representing Franklin County, Alabama
A GRAND MASTER: of the Grand Lodge AF&AM of Alabama 1845 – 1846.

THE MAN
A Tribute of Respect
“As a man and a Mason, we shall not soon look upon his like again —
faithful and true in his devotion to his friends and country, and zealous in
his endeavors to promote the general happiness of man — the Masonic
fraternity of this immediate section are indebted to him perhaps more than
to any other man living or dead for their prosperity — material and
otherwise — and our hearts are sad within us this day with the thought
that we shall look upon his face no more.”(4)
Felix G. Norman, was born January 4, 1808, near Smyrna, Rutherford County,
Tenn. and died August 5, 1885 at Tuscumbia, Alabama. A Lawyer, a Democrat;
a Presbyterian; and a Mason.

He was denied early educational advantages, but was taught in the rudiments
by an older brother. He began life as a merchant, but later taught school
for several years.
He studied under William Casper, was admitted to the bar in Tuscumbia in
the early thirties, and practiced at that point and the surrounding country
until his death.
He was Mayor of Tuscumbia for many years, and represented Franklin County
in the Legislature a number of times in the legislature for sessions of
1841, 1842, 1844, 1845 and 1847-8, inclusive.
Although he supported the Confederacy with his means and influence, he was
debarred from active participation on account of his age.
He was the son of John and Margaret [Stockird or Stockard] Norman who lived
at Smyrna, Rutherford county, Tenn.
Married:  August 17, 1848 at Dickson, to Jane Lavina Cook
Jane, was born in Huntsville, Ala., Feb. 22, 1824, and died June 25, 1901.
A daughter of Henry and Jane [Shelton] Cook, of Spotsylvania County, Va.,
and a sister of Mrs. Amanda Barton. Residents for some years of Huntsville,
later locating in Tuscumbia where they spent the remaining years of their
lives, the former for some time government agent for the disposition of
Indian lands.
Children:
    1. John Henry;
    2. Felix Grundy[Jr.], m. Della Phares, Salinas, Calif.;
    3. Mary Barton, m. John R. Charlton, La Verge, Tenn.;
    4. Kate Cook, m. Hall S. Kirkpatrick;
    5. Thomas Edgar, m. Lee Ellis, Memphis;
    6. James Beverly, last residence: Tuscumbia.”
    He and his wife are buried in the Oakwood Cemetery at Tuscumbia. Mrs.
Norman before her marriage was Jane L. Cook, a daughter of Henry and Jane
Cook and Mr. and Mrs. Norman were the parents of several well known children.

THE LEGISLATURE
Felix G. Norman, of Franklin, was born and educated in Tennessee. He
represented Franklin for the first time at the session of 1841, and by
continuous elections, he served in the House until the close of the session
of 1847-8, since which time he has been in private life, engaged in the
practice of law. While in the Legislature, Col. Norman, was a very efficient
member, both in debate and in Committees. He was a Democrat from honest
conviction, and never departed from that faith, but always kept himself in
the path of duty according to the best of his judgment.
Acting on principle, he opposed at every step the resolutions of the General
Assembly accepting Alabama’s portion of the proceeds of the public lands.
In the same manner, he opposed what he considered the improper identity in
the same resolution, on the Constitutional amendment providing for biennial
sessions of the Legislature, and for the removal of the Seat of Government
at the session of 1845. In all this, he only yielded to a sense of duty, to
prevent injustice, or an unsafe precedent. However laudable his purpose, he
course on the question of removal resulted to his injury, through influences
subsequently brought to bear against him, in a political sense.
From his bearing in the Legislature, the courtesy he always exhibited in
debate, the intelligence with which he handled questions, and the ease and
graceful elocution which seemed natural to him, Col. Norman was
unquestionably cast in a large intellectual mould, capable of expansion
beyond the limits within which it was his fortune to be confined as a
political aspirant. Although rigid in the tenets of his party, and at times
somewhat acrimonious under provocation, he was not blind to the merits of a
measure because it may have originated with his opponents.
He was bold and fearless, often displaying the gallantry of ancient
knighthood in the legislative arena, shivering a lance with friend or foe
without personal malice. His face was luminous with good feeling, and his
whole deportment was that of a gentleman sensible of the rights of others,
and careful of his own, in all that relates to the substantial etiquette of
life. Had his lot permitted a more congenial opening for the development of
his character after the inward model, there is no doubt that Col. Norman
would have filled a large space before the public, and achieved a reputation
as proudly National as that which he now enjoys is, in local view,
distinguished for ability and honor. Perhaps the greatest obstacle to his
advancement to higher places has been a certain measure of self-respect and
honorable sensibility, which made intrigue and management the usual medium
of success repugnant to his nature. He has abundant reason, however to be
satisfied with the result, in his own high and unimpeachable character. He
is still in the meridian of life, and he resides in Tuscumbia.”

FREEMASON
The Grand Master Portrait of Felix G.Norman Sr., is located at the
Grand Lodge of Alabama, City of Montgomery.
A MEMBER OF: Washington Lodge No. 36 AF&AM., Tuscumbia, Alabama
    Junior Warden: 1835.
    Master:1837-43, 1846-48, 1850-54, 1858, 1860 & 1878.
    Treasurer: 1861-62 & 1865.
    Senior Warden: 1865.
    Grand Lodge, AF&AM of Alabama.
    Junior Grand Warden: 1837-38.
    Senior Grand Warden: 1841.
    Deputy Grand Master: 1842-43
    Grand Master: of the Grand Lodge AF&AM of Alabama 1845 – 1846.
    When the cornerstone of the new, Tuscumbia Masonic Temple, was put down,
a engraved cooper plaque was placed inside the stone. It read as follows:
“Washington Lodge No. 36
Tuscumbia, Alabama
Felix G. Norman, Worshipful Master
William Harvey, Senior Warden
Lewis G. Garrett, Junior Warden
July 3 1847. A. L. 5847
American Independence 71
Felix Grundy Norman
Most Worshipful Grand Master”

CREDITS
(1)From “History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography Vol. IV by
Thomas Owen, 1921.”
(2)From Reminiscences of Public Men in Alabama ~ for Thirty Years, by
William Garrett, 1872.
(3)From Colbertians, A History of Colbert County Alabama, and Some of Its
Pioneer Citizens Before 1875., by R. L. James, originally published 1945 by
the Alabama Historical Quarterly, reprinted 1980 by the Natchez Trace
Genealogical Society.
(4)The above tribute of respect for F. G. Norman from Hall of Royal Arch
Chapter, Tuscumbia, Ala, is dated Aug. 10, 1885, and is signed by W. R.
Julian, J. D. Inman, I. T. Cooper, committee; W. T. Roland, H. P.
The Clarion of Tuscumbia {Blake & Son, Publishers} said Mr. Norman was “one
of our best, most respected citizens.”


Doublehead Reserve 1810 Document

Historical Marker for Doublehead Reserve

Historical Marker for Doublehead Reserve

Lessees and squatters on the lands of the native americans were numerous. Among them were several lines of our families. The petition against the removal from lands of Double Head Reserve follows. Even though no date is known of when the petition was drawn up, it would seem that the year would have been 1810. It was received in Washington DC in December 1810.The locale of these petitioners seems to have been in the northwest section of what would become the

 state of Alabama in 1818. They lived inpresent day Lauderdale, Franklin and Colbert County. All spelling of names are original.

DoubleHead Squatters
Petitioners Names
Benjamin BirkJames Cummins

David Hudspeth

W.W.Burney

C.L. Burney

John Beard

John Butler

Gabriel Butler

J.G. Hemphill

Jos Lemaster

Green Hudspeth

R. H. Alpes

Kames Hannegan

Julius Alford

Isreal Harman

Henry Tucker

Hutson Alford

Andrew I. Kavanaugh

Justin Readford

Adam Lacky

James Hooper

James M. Petigrew

James Petigrew

Thomas Caplin

D.B. Potter

Matthew Jones

Hampton Strowell

William Strowell

Samuel Burney Sr.

Samuel Burney Jr.

Charles Burney

_____ Hayes

Carlis Hays

Elisha Wilborn

Elisha Wilson

David Bains

Willis Stevens

Jessee Stevens

James Brion

Alexander Cambrel

William Wilborn

Jos C. Wilborn

Mosser Moss

Benjamin Oberly

James Ellis

M. Armstrong

Thomas Grisham

John Kilough

David Kilough

Amus Wilks

Philop Mebery

Frederick Peeler

Benjamin Yardley

Allen Kilough

Hennery Morehead

Richard Haley

William Welch Jr.

Rebekeah Hays

Charles Moorhead

Jeremiah ____

Moses Norman

William Welch

Benjamin Moore

Thomas Yardley

Jonathan Little

James Young

Jno Crowly

Thomas Bowman

Mathew English

Thos G. Butler

James Brown

Jos Brown

Thos Redish

Richard Butler

Edmund Hatch

James Welch

Joshua Golner

J. N. Coe

Thomas Casey

Nathaniel Casey

John Manley

Archibald Sanders

Joseph Edwards

Hennery Tucker

Hennery Tucker

John I. Moss

John Cavenner

Marlin Towns

Tyre G. Dabney

Joel Wilbourn

James Wilbourn

William Wilbourn

Carlton Wilbourn

H. A. Hays

William Carwood

John Young

John Cole

Abraham Cole Sr.

Abraham Cole Jr.

Mason Moss

Alexander Carrel

Charles Hulsy

James Ellis


Brrr…

it’s cold outside! The photo is of Kris and Krista Burden of Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Kris and Krista Burden


Susan and Clay Howard…

are the people in this photo, but when I see this photo all I see is HER mother and HIS father.

Susan and Clay Howard


Tharp family…

Robert Tharp headstone Osborn Cemetery

Robert Tharp headstone Osborn Cemetery

in Colbert County suffered loss during the War of Northern Aggression and filed a Southern Claim. In this claim file there will be many recognizable names whose descendants remain in the area.

All information for Robert and Sarah has been supplied by Mildred King Enlow, 1010 N Montgomery Ave, Sheffield AL 35660 (1993).

In Dec 1875, Robert Tharp submitted a claim to the Southern Claims Commission Court for reimbursement for items taken by Union troops during t he Civil War. From that application we have this very interesting affidavit: “(During the war) I resided where I now reside…on my own land. My farm contains 320 acres, about 20 acres was in cultivation,

 the balance was woodland.

I was a farmer, part of the time, part of the time I was engaged in avoiding the Confederates, who were attempting to put me in their service, part of the time a refugee in the Union lines, and a part of the time I was engaged as a guide for the Union Scouts of General Wilson’s Army.

Did not change my residence, but did change my occupation…I refused to go into the militia….I sympathized with the Union cause. My feelings and language were strongly in favor of the Union. I used my influence and cast my vote on the side of the Union. I did all I could and cast my vote in behalf of candidates for delegates to the Alabama Convention of 1861 (who were) opposed to the secession of said state and in favor of the United States (actually, the majority of people of that district voted likewise, however, when war started many did fight “in defense of the land”. (mlp)

The Ordinance of Secession was not submitted for ratification to a vote of the people in Alabama. I did not vote thereon, but would have voted against ratification if I had had the opportunity. I adhered to the Union Cause and did not with the State after the ordinance was adopted…In 1862 I was arrested by Confederate soldiers on account of my union sentiments, with my father, Hezekiah Tharp and others of my neighbors (Benjamin F Whitlock’s deposition names another as Hiram Osborne) and carried to Columbus Mississippi, where I was kept in prison three months. I was released by taking an oath not to bear arms against the Confederate states. I took this oath under duress and to avoid great injury which was constantly threatened against me.

In 1863 I was taken as a conscript by an officer and squad of Confederate Cavalry–was carried to Tullahoma, Tennessee, and was there put into the Confederate Army. I escaped and on my way home was arrested, and required to take an oath not to bear arms against the Confederate States, under threats of personal injury, if I did not do so. I was then discharged, it not being known I was a conscript. I always regarded these oaths as of no effect because taken under duress and under threats of great personal harm, unless I took them. … I was also arrested in 1864 about the last of April, in company with Martin Tharp, Hezekiah Tharp Jr, my brothers, Reese Tease, and James Pennington (not sure who this was–Lou [John Pennington was husband of Parmlia A Tharp daughter of Hezekiah Tharp]) by a squad of Confederate Soldiers commanded I think by one Lieutenant Russell and belonging to the command of Col Estes of the Conscript Bureau at Tuscumbia, Alabama.

We were carried to Mount Hope, Lawrence County, Alabama. Stayed there about 24 hours, were ordered to be carried across the mountains to Tuscaloosa. Were carried one days travel into the mountains, and at about 9 o’clock in the night were tied together and carried out to be shot all at once. The soldiers detailed to shoot us were brought up in front of us, and fired upon us, killing all of my companions outright, and riddling my clothes and cutting the ropes that bound me. I fell with the others, feigning to be dead. They left after rifling the pockets and taking the hats of those killed, even cutting the buttons from the military uniform of Reece Tease, who was a Union Soldier, belonging to the 1st Alabama Regiment, commanded by Col George E Spencer.

After they had left I arose and departed, lying out in places of safety until General Wilson’s Union Scouts came into the county where I lived. I went with them on their rounds, assisting them in their purpose s as a guide. Went with them to East Port Mississippi in Feb 1865 and went into the Union lines on a Federal steamboat to Nashville. Went from Nashville to Louisville, Kentucky, went to avoid conscription in the Confederate Service to escape injury…I also went to Missouri opposite Cairo Illinois, where I engaged in working on a farm.

I returned home to my family in Alabama about the 10th of June 1865, after the close of the war…In Mar 1862 Confederate Soldiers took one horse from me, I suppose for the use of the army. In 1864 General Hood’s Confederate Army on its retreat killed and used all of my hogs. I have never received any pay for any of said property…On or about April 1, 1863, while that portion of the United States Army, commanded by Col Straight, was on its march in the direction of Rome, Georgia, a large number of Soldiers belonging to said command came to my residence then in Franklin, now Colbert County, Alabama, commanded by officers, and took and carried away the box of Tobacco and the horse. Besides (500 or 600 soldiers) there was present myself, my wife Sarah, Henry Vandever, and Hezekiah Tharp, my father, now dead. I complained to the officer present. He said he could not help it. Said property was taken in the day time at about 12 o’clock, not taken secretly. The horse was about 5 years old, of large size and in very good order. Was worth then and there $125. The tobacco was a good article of manufactured tobacco and was worth $40. Said tobacco was a large sized box of 100 lbs about. I did not see the horse taken, but I know it was taken by said command because it was there when the command came and was gone when it left. … Sarah Tharp, his wife, made an affidavit to these events and said that she did see the troops of Col or Major Straight take the horse…William H Vandiver says he was in the employment of the claimant and over the field close to his house. He saw the said command passing and hastened to the house and found that the Iron gray horse about 5 years old…which was there just before and with which I had plowed was gone, having been taken by said command. On my arrival I found claimant’s wife in tears because said horse had been taken…I saw also that a store house which claimant had, had the door broken down. I knew claimant had tobacco in said store house and that all was gone on my arrival…

A Deposition by Benjamin F Whitlock (cousin of claimant): . ..I lived within four miles of Robert Tharp…I conversed with claimant often about the war–its causes and progress. I was myself an adherent of the Union cause and was so regarded by the claimant. Claimant always declared he was opposed to secession, the Confederacy and the war, that the war was caused by traitors for their own benefit and not for benefit of the people….I knew claimant’s opinions and sympathies to be in favor of the Union cause because he often expressed them both to me alone and also in the presence of other Union Men. His public reputation was that of a loyal Union man and he was so regarded by his loyal neighbors as well as Confederates themselves….

Another deposition by William McCorkle, not related to claimant, says he lived about a mile and a half from claimant, that he saw him once or twice a week, that he conversed with often about the war, and that he, William McCorkle, was an adherent of the Union cause and was so regarded by the claimant.

In Oct 1876, Robert Tharp Jr. was awarded $100 for the horse taken by Union troops, the tobacco being disallowed. I think he must have used the “Jr.” to distinguish himself from his uncle, Robert Tharp.

*********************************************************************************************

Robert Tharp was one son of a large family of children born to Hezekiah Tharp and Nancy Colbert. Colonel George Colbert (Chief George Colbert) did not wish his daughter Nancy to go on the sure-to-die-in-transit Trail of Tears. He solved that problem by marrying her to a white man, Hezekiah Tharp.


Grammy and the little punkin…

hold your horses – not quite Grammy, but Ghee is close enough. She is the best Ghee in the history of the world!!!

Ghee and the Little Punkin Oct 2005


I saw this little picture again…

and I just could not help myself. I had to post it here. It is my way of giving her a little hug for the future.

Taylor Anne Sledge Jan 2011


Hundreds of years of experience…

is what this crew of Southern Railway men have collectively.

Southern Railway Annual Picnic 1953

Southern Railway Annual Picnic 1953