The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Sheffield

Image

This is a 1930s photo of the WMSD radio station tower located in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama.

WMSD radio tower 1930s


Another photo from the past…

of a Sheffield couple. This photo is of Lacey King, wife Mary Frances Davenport King and Mary Evelyn King, their first child. Evelyn is an accomplished dulcimer player. She won Most Beautiful Baby contest when she was little.

Photo of Lacey, Frances and Evelyn King


Photos from the past…

often remind us of someone else. This photo was made circa 1956 at Mama and Gran’s house at 1308 W 8th Street in Sheffield, across the street from Southwest Elementary School. That was the home of my grandparents, Robert Duncan Peebles and Betty Drue Jane Tolbert Peebles. This was way before Gran had the house remodeled  It had been a sort of shotgun house with a long hallway going from the front door to the backdoor at the back end of the hall. There were fourvintage telephone bench more doors, two on each side that led to other rooms. They had the area of the hall beyond the hall boxed in and it was where Mama’s icebox and hoosier cabinet was housed, along with her bonnets, her galoshes, some aprons and gloves for outside work. That wallpaper was a deep red and if I recall correctly was flocked. To the right of the front door was the telephone bench. This was a type of desk that had a small top for the phone and a seat attached to it for sitting while on the phone. The photo depicts only the structure for a telephone bench but does not really resemble the one that Mama and Gran had. They had one, and he may have built it, that was some sort of red naugahyde material. I believe there were gold thumbnails at the seams. The seat and table portion were positioned as you see, but the chair part was the red material and there were no legs visible as the whole thing went to the floor. Their first phone was on a four household party line as was ours. Now, that was fun.

This photo is of me when I was about five or six years old. For some reason as a girl at Easter, I always got a new dress, shoes, and an Easter hat. I guess that is what a girl got on Easter in those days. There I am with my Easter basket, my pretty dress, my Easter hat and my right eye parked next to my nose. As best as I recall we would go to Mama and Gran’s and Mama would always make pictures of us sitting on that same red bench in their hall. My eyes were blue and my hair had copper highlights. Later and for years I almost always wore my hair in a ponytail.  There is a little girl who favors me and that makes me happy. This photo reminds me of her. I wanted her to see this photo.

photo of Carolyn Murray about 1956


Obituaries are useful tools…

in family history research. They can often provide information that is found in no other place. Wayne County, Tennessee just above Lauderdale County in Alabama had many residents that were connected to the Shoals area residents by blood and marriage. Below are some obituaries found in books or bibles of relatives of which some had connections to Lauderdale County and the Shoals area.

Names familiar to the residents of the Shoals area include: David Clay Whitten; John W Stribling, Jr; J R Butler; Sallie Butler; M F Butler; Jasper Randolph “Jap” Linville the father of Osbie Linville and Lillie Linville his mother;  Dewey Clyde Barkley; Reba Earline Brewer; John Thomas Cybert; Annie Downing; Odie Hayes Bevis Gullick; Ethel Holt; Oliver Hugh Holt;  Richard Harvey Wilson who was owner of Wilson Food Mart; John F O (Lando) Townsend; Minnie Wright Roberson; Lennie Whitten; Mattie Brewer McCorkle; Roxie Viola Balentine; Sarah O Stooksberry who is tied to the Stooksberrys of Lauderdale County; Terry Reece; and Joe Pat Roberts.

This is a repost from the TnUSgenweb page:

All notes in brackets [ ] are those of the page editor.


David C. Whitten, Jr.
submitted by
Mrs. Jo Anne Norwood
Obituary pasted to the
fly pages of the David Clay
Whitten Bible. Publication not given.
David C. Whitten, Jr., my youngest brother, was born in Wayne county, Tenn. if I am not mistaken, March 8, 1864, and died there, May 21, 1879. Surely the truth of the expression “Death loves a shining mark,” was seen in his case. He was converted at nine years of age, and immediately joined the Methodist Church. His life was short, but a happy one. He was always a good child, and after his profession of religion he was indeed a model boy. He was obedient to his parents — did that they bade him with as much cheerfulness as any one could. Their wish was his pleasure. His sickness was of short duration, and he died an easy death. He was very judicious in the selection of his companions, it being a maxim of his, that it is better to keep good company, or else keep none. Few boys of his age ever had more friends among both the aged and the young, for he won all hearts to him. His temper was always even — nothing seemed to fret or worry him, for his religion enabled him to walk uprightly before his God. His history may be summed up in few words. As a son, he was dutiful; as a brother, good and kind; as a student, attentive to his studies; as a playmate, gently and living; as a boy, a model; and as a Christian, pious and devoted to the Church. A letter from his father, bearing date of the day he died, says: “My son, David, your youngest, sweet little brother, died this morning. To me it is the saddest day of my life. I feel that my staff and stay for my declining years is broke. The family takes his death very hard. He died easily and in a few minutes. He was the most patient person in sickness I ever saw; complained of nothing but pain; took everything given him kindly … It is common for people to say, when they lose a child, “That was the best one.” I can say, from the depth of my heart, he was the sweetest-spirited child I have reared. My wish was his will. He rarely fretted — was nearly always in a good humor, and was never too tired to wait on me. He was strictly pious. I never knew of his doing an immoral deed in all his life. His ma said to him the day before he died, ‘Son, would you be afraid to die?’ His response was prompt, heroic and decided, ‘No, ma, I should not.’ ”  Thus died one too pure and good for earth. He was the first one of our immediate family to die. Truly God has been good to us. My father, mother, two brothers, and two sisters – all the family – are religious, and my sincere prayer is that we may meet at last in that clime where death is an eternal stranger. L. F. Whitten, Munford, Ala, May 28, 1879.
Boone W. Whitten
Submitted by
Mrs. Jo Anne Norwood
Obituary pasted to the fly pages of the David Clay Whitten Bible. Publication not given.
My Dear Brother, Boone W. Whitten, was born in Wayne county, Tennessee, September 8th, 1860. Was born of the Spirit, September, 7th, 1873, which was his thirteenth birthday. Of the genuineness of his conversion he was never in doubt. Of the wisdom he manifested in joining the Church at an early age, there can be no question. He was a Christian boy, of choice and pious from principle. It seems hard to give up one who was so promising, so pure; but we must bow in submission to the will of the Lord. Just before his death he prayed, “Father, they will be done, not mine.” He was living at my house, teaching school; had been for five months, and I know whereof I affirm, when I say he was one of the purest, steadiest young men I ever met. He had built up a fine school in this community, and in the school room, every morning, asked God to bless his pupils in their studies, and him in teaching them. He was engaged, mind, soul and body in his profession. He taught by example and precept; was studious at home, carrying on his course of study which he had pursued in college. While he instructed the minds of his pupils, he looked closely after their morals, and when dying said: “Tell my pupils to remember the good advice I gave them in the schoolroom, and be good boys and girls and meet me in heaven.” In 1881 he attended the State Normal School, at Florence, Ala. where he was loved by his fellow pupils, President and Professors. President S. P. Rice is said to have remarked when he left college: “If all my boys had been as studious as Boone Whitten, it would have been a paradise on earth.” But as a Christian he was nearer perfect. He prayed fervent, trustful prayers around out fireside that he might grow in grace and get to be nearer like Jesus. He studied his Bible every day, and frequently called my attention to certain portions of the Scriptures which were more precious, unto him than jewels. his fixedness of purpose to serve God was unalterable. He would have died rather than do wrong, or bring reproach on the precious Savior. When he came to died, April 21st, I said to him: “Brother, is your faith still strong?” He replied, “Yes, sir, I know that Jesus will save me.” He called all around him and bade them farewell, telling them to meet him in heaven, and sent loving messages to his parents, brother and sisters. During a prayer offered by Brother Andrew Jackson, he said: “Rock of Ages, cleft for me, let me hide myself in thee,” and repeated it. He gave minute instructions relative to the distribution of his effects, and requested to be carried back to Tennessee and buried by the side of our brother, David, who died three years since. I carried him back, read the burial service in the presence of hundreds of his friends, and buried his body in hope of glorious resurrection.  L. F. Whitten, Easta Boga, Ala., April 28, 1882.
David Clay Whitten
Submitted by
Mrs. Jo Anne Norwood
Obituary pasted to the fly pages of the David Clay Whitten Bible. Publication not given.
The subject of this sketch was born in Lauderdale County, near Florence, Ala., July 27, 1823. His long and useful life was spent in Wayne County, Tenn., and nearly entirely so in the same community. He was honored and respected by all who knew him. He never was defeated but once before the people for any office for which he asked at the ballots of his fellow-citizens, and he always believed that it was a benign providence that defeated him in that contest for public preferment. While it was not until 1865 that he was converted and joined the Church, yet from my earliest recollection his home was the itinerant preacher’s home. No preacher ever felt long at a time that he was a guest, but a feeling that he was an inmate of the home would unconsciously steal over not only the preacher, but all whose fortune it was to share his hospitality. Many a Tennessee Conference preacher has shared this grace at his hands and that of his well-ordered household. His bereaved and sorrow-stricken wife, who is truly bereft, and who from her girlhood had feared God and worked righteousness, was his strong stay for more than forty-one years. I never knew a better woman than she. I remember that during the cruel war between the States, when sin of every form held high carnival, she never faltered for a moment in her faith and loyalty to God and his cause. No wonder that out of such a family should be born two itinerant Methodist preachers. Rev. O. B. Whitten, the younger, was one of the most popular young preachers ever in the Memphis Conference. His career was short – only a little more than three years – yet impressing himself upon all who knew him. Rev. L. F. Whitten, of La Fayette, has been a faithful member of that Conference since its organization in 1870. I doubt if any man in that Conference has made a better record for devotion to the cause of Christ, the interest of Methodism and humanity, during these years than he. David Clay Whitten died in peace with God and in hope of heaven Feb. 20, 1889, and was laid beside his three sons who had preceded him to heaven – to await the resurrection of the just.
Truly, to that community, a great man in Israel is fallen, for he was a leader – a natural leader of the people. Especially was this true of him among the young people. He was a theologian of no mean pretensions. Biblical and Methodistic doctrines were questions of highest interest to him, and he took great pleasure in discussing them with men who had read and who thought. But he is gone — we shall see him no more. Peace to his memory, while we plead Heaven’s consoling benedictions upon his bereaved widow, son and two daughters, who mourn their loss.  T. G. W., Moberly, Mo. March 1889. [Note: T. G. W. was Rev. Thomas G. Whitten, son of Joel S. Whitten who was David Clay Whitten’s older brother.]
Mrs. John Y. Parker
Obituary pasted in the front cover of the Mattie Brewer McCorkle Bible, McCorkle-Stafford Collection, Wayne County Historical Society
Mrs. John Y. Parker, 63, died Sunday night of acute indigestion at her home on Indian Creek. Burial took place Monday in the Mt. Hebron Cemetery, the funeral services being conducted by Rev. G. R. Wilkerson and N. C. Jeter. Mrs. Parker was a devoted member of the Christian Church. [Note: This is Eliza (Elizabeth) Lucinda Brewer, b. 1856/7, daughter of Hiram and Cazada Hayes Brewer. She married first to J. T. Lowery; second to Joseph Clayton Stribling; and third to John Y. Parker. Her death occurred before Jan, 20, 1920 since she does not appear in the 1920 census for Wayne County, TN. She does not have a tombstone in the Mt. Hebron Cemetery, although she is buried in the Parker plot. Obituary probably from “The Wayne Countian”.
Lt. John W. Stribling
Obituary pasted in the front cover of the Mattie Brewer McCorkle Bible, McCorkle – Stafford Collection, Wayne County Historical Society
Stribling Is Laid To Rest, Funeral Services Held At Honolulu.
     Funeral services for Lieut. John W. Stribling, Jr., aged 27, of Florence, who was drowned while fishing at Waimea, about 40 miles from Honolulu, on Oct. 13, were held at Schofield Barracks, Honolulu, Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock, according to messages received by his parents here. His wife, who was drowned at the same time, was buried there also.
It is not known here today whether the body of Lieut. William F. Stevenson, aged 29, of Schofield Barracks, a native of South Carolina, who was drowned at the same time, has been found.
A native of Florence, Lieut. Stribling, attended the city schools, graduating from Coffee High School here, and finishing at West Point Military Academy in 1929. He had been stationed with the United States Army at Honolulu for the past four years.
Three years ago he was married to Miss Thora Berge, of Norway, the wedding occurring in Honolulu.
Surviving Lieut. Stribling are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Stribling of Florence; two sisters, Miss Jimmie Lou Stribling, of Florence, and Mrs. J. H. Bidle, of Florence; and two brothers, Cedric Stribling of Florence and Raymond Stribling of Chattanooga. [Note: No date of name of newspaper appears on the clipping. It probably was taken from “The Florence Times” of October 1934. John W. Stribling Jr. was the son of John William and Mattie Belle McFall Stribling, and the grandson of Joseph Clayton Stribling of Lutts, Tennessee.]
James Russell Butler
Submitted by
Jerry L. Butler
Source: The Florence Times, July 6, 1943, page 2
J. R. BUTLER, 73, IS LAID TO REST
Funeral Services Held on Monday Afternoon
James Russell Butler, aged 73, passed away Saturday midnight, at his home, 511 Stevenson Street, Florence, after a several weeks illness. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Sallie Butler, four sons, Aubry and Westley of Florence, Clarke, of Cloverdale and Pat, of Dayton, O.; four daughters, Mrs. Louis Barnes and Mrs. J. T. Rickard, of Florence; Mrs. Ed Montgomery, of Iron City, Tenn., and Mrs. W. F. Ward, of Cloverdale, and one sister, Mrs. Frances Handley, of Texarkana, Tex.
The funeral was held Monday at 2 p. m., from the Methodist Church at Crystal Springs in Wayne County, Tenn. with Rev. J. D. Reid, of the Church of the Nazarene, Florence, officiating. Interment was in the adjoining cemetery, Fielder in charge. Pallbearers were Paul Barnes, F. E. Rickard, R. H. Wilson, Eugene McCluskey, Bill Edwards, Mr. Fortenberry and Mr. Rideout.
Mrs. Sallie Butler
Submitted by
Jerry L. Butler
Source: The Florence Times, November 26, 1943, page 3
MRS. BUTLER, 73, TAKEN BY DEATH
Funeral Arrangements Will Be Announced Later
Mrs. Sallie Butler, aged 73, died this morning at 12:10 o’clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. T. Rickard, 414 Georgia Avenue, Florence.
Survivors are four daughters, Mrs. Floyd Nard, Cloverdale, Mrs. Edward Montgomery, Iron City, Tenn., Mrs. Louis Barnes, Florence, and Mrs. J. T. Rickard, Florence; four sons, Pat Butler, Dayton, O., Clark Butler, Wesley Butler, Aubrey Butler, all of Florence; three sisters, Mrs. S. P. Davis, Mrs. Dora Hanback, and Mrs. Martha Handley, all of Florence; two brothers, Johnie Smith, Cloverdale, and Wesley Smith, Florence; and a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.
Services will be announced later by Brown Service.
Henrietta Lewis
Source: “Wayne Citizen”, Clifton, TN, Thursday, July 4th, 1884.
     Henrietta Lewis born was in Clifton, March 27th, 1883, and died in Clifton, July 9th, 1884.
Her father, Henry A. Lewis, died in Ashland, December 1st, 1882 of consumption and as little “Retta was a very delicate child, we never thought she would live to mature age. Teething and something like the flux was more than her little frame could bear.
And then the angels came one night, And took her soul away; to live with them and God and light, And everlasting day.
The Clifton’s good and gentle folk, Made coffin, shroud and grave, Beneath a little shady oak, Her dust with dust they layed.  J. W. P.
Rev. Ben Martin
Submitted by
Mrs. Grace W. Carver,
Cypress Inn, TN
Rev. Ben Martin Dies Wednesday at 87
     Rev. Ben Martin, veteran of the Civil War and one of the very few survivors of the Union army in this section, died at his home on Hardins creek, Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. following an illness of several days. Rev. Martin had been in Waynesboro Tuesday for short time but was feeling week and fainted before he reached home, and owing to the infirmities of age her death was not unexpected.
Rev. Martin had been a Baptist minister in Wayne County for a long period of years and up to the present year had been rather active in his work for the branch of the Baptist church to which he belonged. He had preached all over Wayne county and was well known to a large number of people over the county.
Mr. Martin had reached his 86th years last March.
The funeral service was held at the residence on Hardins creek at eleven o’clock, Thursday morning and burial was had at McGlamery cemetery south of Collinwood, Thursday afternoon.
Rev. Martin leaves a large family in this section, with a number of sons, daughters and a large number of grand children. [Note: No date or name of publication on clipping. Rev. Martin died 28 Jan 1931 according to his tombstone inscription, McGlamery Cemetery.]
J. B. Lawson
Submitted by
Mrs. Grace W. Carver
Cypress Inn, TN
Lawson Answers Death Summons
Funeral services for J. B. Lawson, 74 of Cypress Inn, Tenn. who died Sunday afternoon following an attack of flew and pneumonia which lasted for three weeks, were held Monday afternoon from the home with Rev. Hallman, his pastor, officiating and Fielder directing.
Mr. Lawson was one of the most highly respected citizens of his community. He always gave  of his time and means to the support of school and church activity. He was a member of the Salem Methodist Church, of Cypress Inn community, and also a member of the Cypress Inn Masonic Lodge.
Mr. Lawson is survived by his wife, Mrs. J. B. Lawson, two sons, S. W. Lawson of Chicago, and W. N. Lawson of Philadelphia, Penn.; two daughters, Mrs. Jessie Bundrant, and Mrs. Hays Spain, both of Waynesboro, Tenn.; and three brothers: Joe Lawson of Oklahoma, W. Y. Lawson of Cypress Inn, and S. H. Lawson of Florence. [Note: no date or name of publication on clipping, but probably the “Wayne Countian”  dated 23/24 October 1928, based on dates on tombstone.]
M. F. Butler
Submitted by
Jerry L. Butler
Source: The Florence Times, Florence, AL, January 18, 1934, page 3
JACKSONBURG FARMER DIED OF PNEUMONUIA JANUARY 11
M. F. Butler, aged 43, died at the family residence at Jacksonburg, Thursday, Jan. 11 after a seven weeks illness of pneumonia.  Mr. Butler, a farmer of that community, was well and favorably known.
Funeral services were conducted at the Railroad Church with Rev. Kerney officiating.  Interment followed in the adjoining cemetery with O. L. North, of Ethridge, Tenn., in charge.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Bessie Butler; six children, four girls, Ida, Gracie, Eva, and May, and two sons, Levoid Elvin and Bobby Joe; his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Butler; four brothers, Clark Butler, of Cloverdale; Wesley, of Wilson; Aubrey of Florence, and Patrick of Kentucky; four sisters, Mrs. J. T. Rickard, Mrs. W. L. Barns, of Florence; Mrs. F. Nord, of Bethel Grove and Mrs. Edward Montgomery, of Oak Grove.
Active pallbearers were Joe Boyd, S. C. Robinson, Jettie Boyd, Charlie Davis and John Henry Davis.  Honorary pallbearers were J. R. Clemons, Troy Myles, C. C. Myles, F. Y. McClure, J. F. Blackburn and E. J. Eckl.
Joseph D. Dunn
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
Friday, Aug. 4, 1950
Funeral Services For Joseph Dunn Conducted July 10
     Funeral services for Joseph D. Dunn were conducted from his home on Route Two, Collinwood, July 10th, with Rev. Robert Spain, pastor of the Methodist church officiating.
Mr. Dunn died at his home July 8th following a long illness. He was 84 years old.
Born in Sunny Side, County Durham, England, He came to this country at the age of 19 and had made his home at Collinwood for the past 20 years. He was a respected resident of the community in which he lived and was a member of the Methodist Church since early manhood.
Survivors are one son, John M. Dunn, of Cincinnati, Ohio: two daughters, Mrs. E. Byler and Mrs. Frances Davenport, both of Collinwood; nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Burial was in the McGlamery Cemetery.
Mrs. Frances Jane Dunn
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
January 1936
Mrs. Frances Jane Dunn
Mrs. Frances Jane Dunn, 65 years old, died January 7, after an illness of several months; at the family home near Collinwood. Funeral services were held the following day, at the home, with Rev. Blankenship, pastor of the Collinwood church, officiating. Interment was in McGlamery cemetery, with Harris, Legg and Williams in charge.
Mrs. Durham [sic] was born in Morton, Durham county, England, but when nine years old was brought by her parents to South Pittsburg, Tenn. She married Joe Dunn at Dayton, Tenn., in 1887.
She is survived by Mr. Dunn; two daughters, Mrs. Byler of Wayne county, and Mrs. Frances Davenport, Dallas, Texas; a son, John Dunn, Muncie, Ind. and seven grandchildren.
Richard Arthur Arnold
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Nashville Tennessean
no date or page on clipping
(1975)
Richard Arnold Services Today
Graveside services will be at 10 a.m. today at Woodlawn Cemetery for Richard Arthur Arnold, 86, an employee of the Nashville Post Office for almost half a century.
Arnold, who has been assistant district manager of the Railway Mail Service and chief statistician during his 46 years in the Postal Service, had been nationally recognized for his work.
Arnold, who died at Vanderbilt Hospital Saturday night after a long illness, had lived for almost half a century at 2120 Ashwood Ave. He moved to McKendree Manor early this year.
Widely known as a ham radio operator, Arnold had helped relay emergency messages during various floods and during World War II.
He was one of the organizers of the Nashville chapter of the National Association of Retired Civil Employees and for many years was chairman of its membership committee. In that capacity he gained many new members and helped push legislation benefiting retired civil employees.
Born near Iron City, Tenn., Feb 13, 1889, Arnold was the son of James D. and Caroline Whitten Arnold. He was graduated from Lawrence County High School and attended the state teachers college at Murfreesboro.
After teaching in Iron City, he entered the Postal Railway Mail Service in 1913, and soon moved to Nashville in that capacity. In 1914, he was married to the former Pearl Spencer of Iron City. She died in 1971.
Arnold taught classes in higher mathematics at Watkins Institute for several years, and after his retirement from the Postal Service in 1959, worked for three years for Third National Bank.
He was active in Belmont United Methodist Church. The Rev. Earl Parker will conduct the services.
Arnold is survived by several nieces and nephews. All former mail service employees and all postal supervisors of the Nashville Post Office will be honorary pallbearers at the services this morning.
J. R. Linville
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
24 Oct 1975, no page on clipping
Funeral services for Jasper Randolph Linville, 86, were conducted October 14, at 10 o’clock from Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church with Rev. O. A. Lindsey, Rev. Doyle Wallace and Rev. Paul Sanderson officiating. Burial was in Railroad Church Cemetery at Iron City. ¶Mr. Linville died October 12 at Rolling Acres Nursing Home in Florence, Ala., where he had made his home for several years. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, the father of Osbie J. Linville, Lauderdale County Superintendent of Education, a member of Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church and a retired brick mason. ¶Surviving are two other sons, Orbie G. of Florence and Clarence Linville of Iron City; three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Mitchell of Florence, Mrs. Aileen McDonald of Sheffield, Ala, and Mrs. Louise Montgomery of Cloverdale, Ala.; a brother, Herman B. Linville of Iron City and two sisters, Mrs. Annie M. Moore of Iron City, and Mrs. Nellie Roberson of Killen, Ala.
J. R. Linville
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, 13 Oct 1975, no page number on clipping.
J. R. Linville Dies at 86
Jasper Randolph (Jap) Linville, 86, father of Osbie J. Linville, Lauderdale County Superintendent of Education died Sunday at Rolling Acres Nursing Home. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, Tenn. a member of Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church and a retired brick mason. ¶Service will be 10 a.m. Tuesday at Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church. Officiating will be Rev. O. A. Lindsey, Doyle Wallace and Paul Sanderson. Burial will be in Railroad Church Cemetery, Iron City, Tennessee. Morrison-Elkins Funeral Home of Florence directing. ¶Surviving in addition to Osbie Linville are two other sons, Orbie G. Linville, Florence; Clarence Linville, Iron City; daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Mitchell, Florence; Mrs. Aileen McDonald, Sheffield; Mrs. Louise Montgomery, Cloverdale; sisters, Mrs. Annie M. Moore, Iron City; Mrs. Nellie Roberson, Killen; brother, Herman B. Linville, Iron City. ¶Bearers will be J. W. Linville, Grady Roberson, Lloyd Moore, Oris Linville, Foy Butler, Edwin Linville, Rayburn Linville, Billy Linville.
Mrs. Mattie Farris Melson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
16 June 1967
Funeral Services Held Sunday For Mrs. Mattie Melson
Funeral services for Mrs. Mattie Farris Melson, 94, of Collinwood were conducted Sunday, June 11 at 2:30 from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Roger Villines officiating. Burial was in McGlamery Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Melson died June 9 at Wayne General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of William Joseph and Nancy Ann Thompson Farris. She was a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Ethel Melson Whitt, of Collinwood, a brother, J. F. Farris Sr. of Memphis; two sisters, Mrs. Laura Melson of Savannah and Mrs. Lola Farris of Caruthersville, MO; and a number of nieces and nephews.
Mrs. Fannie Bell Horton
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 18 August 1967. No page number on clipping.
Funeral Services For Mrs. Horton Conducted Aug. 8
Funeral services for Mrs. Fannie Bell Horton, 83, of Cypress Inn were conducted Aug. 8 at 2 o’clock from Cromwell Cross Roads Church with Willie Daniel officiating. ¶Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mrs. Horton died Aug. 7 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of James Wayne and Betty Woody Horton. In 1898 she married Peter A. Horton who passed away in 1907. She was a member of the Free Will Baptist Church. ¶Survivors are a son, Lee W. Horton of Cypress Inn; a daughter Mrs. Mary Ada Murphy of Lutts; a brother, Jasper Lee Horton of Cypress Inn; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Dewey Clyde Barkley
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times
22 Jan 1972. No page number on clipping.
Dewey Clyde Barkley, 89, 902 Sannoner Ave., died today at the residence. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., had lived in Florence 30 years. He was a charter member and Deacon at Highland Baptist Church, a member of the Florence Masonic Lodge, and was the retired owner of Barkley Air Conditioning and Heating Co. ¶Funeral services will be held Sunday at 3 p.m. at Highland Baptist Church with Rev. Jodie Gamble officiating. Burial will follow in Florence Cemetery, Morrison-Elkins of Florence directing. The body will remain at the funeral home until one hour prior to the service when it will be placed in the church. ¶He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Edith T. Barkley; a brother, Carter Barkley, Florence. ¶Bearers will be Allen Lovelace, Billy Kelley, Raymond Sitter, Edgar Young, Guy Hamilton, E. G. Dorris, Tom McDougal, Ottie Stansell.
Mrs. Mary Catherine Barkley
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times,
Monday, 15 Feb 1971
no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Mary Catherine Barkley, 90, Cypress Inn, Tenn. Rt. 1, died at Wayne County Hospital Sunday at 3:30 p.m. ¶She was a native and lifelong resident of Wayne County and widow of John Rich Barkley. She was a member of Balentine Freewill Baptist Church. ¶Service will be conducted Tuesday at 2 p.m. from Balentine Freewill Baptist Church by Rev. Emmerald [sic] Bailey. Burial will be in Balentine Cemetery, Spry of Florence directing. The body will be at Collinwood Funeral Home until time for services. ¶Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Thomas E. Franks, Cypress Inn; Mrs. Altie Hammock, Waynesboro; Mrs. Howard Wright, Cypress Inn; Mrs. Henry Dodd, South Bend, Ind.; two sons, Allen Barkley, Iron City; Willie Barkley, Lutts, Tenn.; a brother, Wallace Patterson, Lawrenceburg; 35 grandchildren; 42 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Reba Earline Brewer
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times
Monday, 15 Feb 1971, no page number on clipping
Mrs. Reba Earline Brewer, 48, of 311 S. Richards St., Florence, died Sunday at 12 noon at Lauderdale Christian Nursing Home. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, Tenn. and had lived here 26 years. She was a member of Railroad Methodist Church in Wayne County, Tenn. ¶Surviving are the husband, Buford Brewer; three sons, Cecil, James Larry, Donald Ray; mother, Mrs. Hershel Keeton; a sister, Mrs. George Robert McMullan, all of Florence; four brothers, Neller Keeton, Junior Newton Keeton, bobby Keeton, Billy Keeton, a grandchild, all of Florence. ¶Bearers will be cousins.
Edgar Byler
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News,
Friday, 24 May 1968, no page number on clipping.
Funeral services for Edgar Byler, 79, of Collinwood were conducted Sunday, May 19 at 2 o’clock from Collinwood Church of Christ with Roger Villines officiating. Burial was in McGlamery Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Byler died May 17 at Colonial Manor Nursing Home. ¶He was a native of Izzard County, Ar., a son of Shadrach E. and Lauretta Downing Byler. He was a retired Pharmacist and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors are a son, Edgar D. Byler of Collinwood; two step-sons, Robert Walsh of Marianna, Pa., and Joseph Walsh of Houston, Texas; two daughters, Mrs. Laura Jane Walround [sic] of Rochelle, Va., and Mrs. Naomi Ruth Parker of Downey, Calif.; two sisters, Mrs. C. J. Farris and Mrs. M. A. Brown both of Collinwood; and six grandchildren.
John Thomas Cypert
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times
Thursday, 20 June 1974, no page number on clipping.
John Thomas Cypert, Sr., 88, Rt. 5, Florence, died Wednesday at Mitchell Hollingsworth Annex. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., had lived in Florence 50 years, was a retired carpenter. ¶Funeral services will be held Friday at 3 p.m. at the First Church of the Nazarene, Florence, with Rev. Wendell Shirley officiating. Burial will follow in Greenview Memorial Park, Morrison-Elkins of Florence directing. ¶The body will remain at the funeral home until 2 p.m. when it will be placed in the church. ¶He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Della Wright Cypert; three sons, John T. Cypert, Jr., Russell Cypert, and Douglas Cypert, all of Florence; five daughters, Miss Orine Cypert, Miss Pauline Cypert, Mrs. Sarah Pumphrey, all of Alexander, VA; Mrs. Frances Thoresen, Springfield, VA., Mrs. Emily Jean Wirokman, Landover, Md.; a sister, Mrs. Emma Blackwell, Carlisle, Ark., nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren. ¶Nephews will serve as bearers.
Mrs. Annie Downing
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times,
1 June 1971, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Annie Downing, 73, Florence, Rt. 3, died this morning at 5:30 at ECM Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., and had resided in Lauderdale County most of her life. She was a member of Stony Point Church of Christ and the widow of Taylor Downing. ¶Services will be conducted Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. from Morrison-Elkins Chapel in Florence by Derrell Davis. Burial will be in Grenview Memorial Park, Morrison-Elkins Directing. ¶Survivors are a sister, Mrs. Roxie Lindsey of Florence, nieces and nephews. ¶Bearers will be nephews.
Mrs. Odie Hayes Bevis Gullick
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times
14 Feb 1973, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Odie Hayes Bevis Gullick, 76, 131 Button Ave., died Tuesday at the residence. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., a member of the Jackson Heights Church of Christ. ¶Funeral services will be held Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at Morrison Elkins Chapel, Florence, with Leon Cole officiating, Morrison-Elkins of Florence directing. ¶She is survived by a daughter, Mrs. D. A. Yearout, Waverly, Tenn.; two sons, B. L. Bevis, Florence, and J. C. Bevis, Midland, Tex, 17 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren. ¶Members of the Jackson Heights Church of Christ will serve as bearers.
Mrs. Myrtle Hanback
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, no date or place number on clipping.
Mrs. Myrtle Hanback, 52, Iron City, Tenn., died Friday at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., and the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Tom Bates. ¶Surviving are the husband, Howard Hanback; three daughters, Mrs. Ina Gilchrist and Mrs. Arnell Bratton of Collinwood, Tenn.; Mrs. Idell Robbins, Warren, Mich.; a son, Edsel Hanback, Lincoln Park, Mich.,; three sisters, Mrs. Mollie Fowler, Cypress Inn, Tenn.; Mrs. Joyce Dodd, Mrs. Ollie Stricklin, both of Iron City, Tenn.; three brothers, Wesley, Cleo and Clarence Bates, all of Iron City; seven grandchildren, and a number of nieces and nephews. ¶Service will be conducted today at 2 p.m. from Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church near Cypress Inn. Burial will be in Collinwood Memory Gardens. ¶The body will remain at the Collinwood Funeral Home until time for services.
Mrs. Ethel Holt
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, no date or page number on clipping.
Mrs. Ethel Holt, 79, of Florence, died Tuesday at ECM Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County. ¶Services will be held Thursday at 10 a.m. at Sherrod Ave. Church of Christ with Robert Brooks officiating. Burial will be in Mt. Hope Cemetery in Wayne County, Tenn., with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. The body will be placed in the church one hour prior to the service. ¶Survivors include one son, Robert Holt, Louisville, Ky.; six daughters, Mrs. Ruth Koger, Miss Sue Holt, Florence, Mrs. Frances Nichols, Gadsden, Mrs. Betty Duncan, Gallatin, Tenn., Mrs. Nell Anderson, Scottsboro, Mrs. Mary Ann Malone, Decatur; one brother, Jim Spain, Iron City, Tenn.; one sister, Mrs. Pearl Coffman, Iron City; 13 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Oliver Noah Holt
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times,
Friday, 21 June 1974, no page number on clipping.
Oliver Noah Holt, 55, 121 E. Lelia St., Florence, died early Friday morning at ECM Hospital following a lengthy illness. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, Tennessee, and a member of the Florence Boulevard Church of Christ. He was a former employe [sic] of White Rubber Products in Florence. ¶Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Sunday at Mt. Hope Church of Christ in Wayne County, Bro. Kelby Smith officiating. Burial will follow in the adjoining cemetery, Spry Funeral Home of Florence directing. The body will be at the funeral home until one hour prior to services. ¶Survivors include the wife, Mrs. Annie B. Holt, of Florence; three daughters, Mrs. Betty Jean Cantlin of New York City, N.Y., Miss Judy Ann Pigg and Mis Vicky Carol Holt of Florence; five sons, Noah Gaylon Pigg, Oliver M. Holt, Garrison Andrew Holt, Ricky Marion Holt and Nickey Keith Holt, all of Florence; his mother, Mrs. Daisy Lorene Holt of Florence; four sisters, Mrs. Elsie Hall of Florence, Mrs. Mildred Collins, Mrs. Billy Ruth Weddington and Mrs. Betty Lash, all of Florence; two brothers, Roy Lee Holt of Waynesboro, Tenn., and Ray Holt of Florence, and five grandchildren. ¶ Bearers will be Billy Staggs, Ronnie Green, Leonard Nichols, Buck Bogus, Jim Bogus and Tommy Holt.
Mrs. Lillie Linville
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times
5 Oct 1970, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Lillie Linville, 76, of 414 Georgia Ave., Florence, died this morning at 7:45 at ECM Hospital. ¶She was native of Wayne County, Tenn., and had lived here for 36 years. She was a member of Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church. ¶Services will be conducted Tuesday at 2 p.m. from Royal Avenue Freewill Baptist Church by Rev. Doyle Wallace and Rev. Dee Glover. Burial will be in Railroad Cemetery, Morrison-Elkins directing. The body will be at the funeral home until being placed in the church one hours prior to services. ¶Surviving are the husband, J. R. Linville, three daughters, Mrs. Myrtle Mitchell, Mrs. Louise Montgomery, Florence; Mrs. Aline McDonald of California; three sons, Osbie J., Florence; W. Clarence Linville, Iron City, Tenn., Rt. 1; Orbie G., Florence; 14 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; a great-great-grandchild.
Will Turner Moore
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source, Florence Times,
Monday, 29 April 1974, no page number on clipping.
Mr. Will Turner Moore, 75, Rt. 2, Iron City, Tenn. died Sunday after an extended illness at Crockett General Hospital. ¶He was a retired farmer. ¶Services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Williams Chapel with L. O. Cook and Lloyd Jones officiating. Burial will be in Hollis Cemetery with Loretto Memorial Chapel directing. ¶The body will be at the residence until time for services. ¶Surviving are the widow, Ola Risner Moore, Iron City; five daughters, Mrs. Lois Linville, Noblesville, Ind.; Mrs. Inell Russ, Mrs. jewel Tidwell, Mrs. Joanne Thompson, all of Iron City, and Mrs. Carolyn Hood of St. Joseph, Tenn.; five sons, G. W., Junior, Dale, Charles and Billy, all of Rt. 2, Iron City; 39 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.
Samuel (Sam) Theodore Wilson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, Tuesday 1 Aug 1972, no page number on clipping.
Samuel (Sam) Theodore Wilson, Iron City, Tenn.; Rt. 1, died Monday. ¶He was born Aug. 5, 1892. ¶Services will be conducted Wednesday at 2 p.m. from Railroad Methodist Church, Chisholm Highway, by Willie Daniel and Emerald Bailey. Burial will be in the adjoining cemetery. ¶The body will be at Wayne Memory Garden Funeral Home at Collinwood, Tenn., until time for services. ¶ Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Beula Roberson Wilson, Iron City, Rt. 1; two daughters, Mrs. Irene Scott Hogan, Iron City, Rt. 1; Mrs. Vera Harper, Cypress Inn, Tenn. Rt. 1; a brother, Jimmy Wilson, Iron City; 10 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren, and three great-great-grandchildren.
Richard Harvey Wilson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, Saturday, 17 June 1972, no page number on clipping.
Richard Harvey Wilson, 82, Rt. 6, Florence, died at the residence Thursday morning. ¶Mr. Wilson was a native of Wayne County, Tenn., had moved to Lauderdale County in 1921, going into the grocery business. he was president and founder of the Wilson Food Grocery Chain, retiring in 1966. ¶He was a member of East Florence Church of Christ. ¶ Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the East Florence Church of Christ, Franklin T. Puckett officiating. Burial will follow in Florence Cemetery, Spry of Florence directing. ¶The body will remain at the funeral home until being placed in the church one hour prior to services. ¶He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Roxie Barnett Wilson; a daughter, Mrs. Bernice Shooter, Florence; three sons, Cecil H. Wilson; Owen T. Wilson and Orlan V. Wilson, all of Florence; three sisters, Mrs. Fern Dalton, Florence, Mrs. Gertrude Hays, and Mrs. Itlie Rich, both of Iron City, Tenn.; two brothers, Proctor and Shelby Wilson, both of Iron City; eight grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren.
Walter F. Whitten
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, 23 Aug 1973, page 2.
Funeral services were held Tuesday for Walter F. Whitten, 74, Rt. 1, Iron City, Tenn. ¶Mr. Whitten died Sunday at ECM Hospital. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Rosie Rich Whitten; a son, Fred Allen Whitten, Florence; three daughters, Mrs. Ora Jean Kelley, Florence, Mrs. Earlene Barkley and Mrs. Eliza Butler, both of Iron City; five sisters, Mrs. Mae Gallien, Mrs Bulah Stutts [sic], both of Florence, Miss [sic] Virgie Rich, Iron City, Miss [sic] Velma Rich, Savannah, Tenn.; 10 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren. ¶Services were held at Middle Tennessee Funeral home, Collinwood, with Rev. Willie Daniel and Rev. Emerald Bailey officiating. Burial was in Wayne County Memory Gardens, Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. ¶Nephews served as bearers.
Ernest Warrington
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, Thursday, 16 July 1970
Ernest Warrington, 66, Rt. 1, Lutts, Tenn.; died Thursday, from injuries sustained in a farm accident Thursday afternoon. ¶Funeral services were held today at 3 p.m. at the Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel, Waynesboro. Burial will follow in Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Middle Tennessee Funeral home directing. ¶Mr. Warrington was a native of Wayne County, a farmer, a member of the Church of Christ. ¶He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Christine Beckham Warrington; three sons, B. G. Warrington, Lutts, James Ronald Warrington, Winneconne, Wis., Jerry Lynn Warrington, of the residence; a daughter, Mrs. Virginia Penney, Clarksville, Tenn; a brother, Glenn Warrington, Savannah; two sisters; Miss Marguerite Warrington and Mrs. Sallie Kate White, both of Tuscumbia; eight grandchildren.
John F. O. (Lando) Townsend
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, Thursday, 3 Jan 1974, no page number on clipping.
John F. O. (Lando) Townsend, 80, 1009 North Wood Avenue, Florence, died Wednesday night a Mitchell-Hollingsworth Annex. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, Tenn.; and had resided here since 1911. He was a member of the North Wood United Methodist Church and served as a postal employe[sic] 36 years before retiring. ¶Services will be conducted Friday at 2 p.m. from Morrison-Elkins Chapel, Florence, by Dr. O. S. Gamble. Burial will be in Florence Cemetery, Morrison-Elkins Funeral Home of Florence directing. ¶Surviving are a son, Robert L. Townsend, Florence; two brother, Carter Townsend, Florence; Edward Townsend, Greenhill; two granddaughters. ¶Bearers will be Eugene Townsend, Williard Townsend, Troy Townsend, J. R. Richards, Henry Killen, Jr., Royce Quigley.
Elbert Lee Stricklin
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, 1973. Exact date and page number not on clipping.
Elbert Lee Stricklin, 65, Iron City, Tenn., Rt. 1, died Wednesday at Wayne County General Hospital, Waynesboro, Tenn. ¶Services will be conducted Friday at 2 p.m. from Railroad Church in Wayne County by William M. Holloway. Burial will be in Wayne County Memory Gardens, Collinwood, Tenn., Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. ¶He was a native of Wayne County and a member of the Methodist Church. ¶Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Clara Gallien Stricklin; five sons, Shaler and Robert of Cypress Inn, Tenn.; John D., Richard Neal, and Marion H.; all of Collinwood, Tenn.; a daughter, Mrs. Virginia Beard, Iron City, Rt. 1; four brothers, James, Waynesboro; Dee, Florida; Jay and Fred, Lutts, Tenn.; two half-brothers, Charlie Stricklin, Martin, Tenn.; Arthur Stricklin, Savannah, Tenn.; a sister, Mrs. Estelle McFall, Savannah; seven grandchildren; three step grandchildren.
Mrs. Minnie Wright Roberson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Florence Times, 26 June 1971, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Minnie Wright Roberson, 74, Wayne County, Tenn., died at ECM Hospital Friday at 5 p.m. ¶She was a lifelong resident of Wayne County, and member of Railroad Methodist Church. ¶Surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Ivan Pigg, Wayne County; three son, Randle, Florence; Ernest, Wayne County; Carl, Sheffield; a brother, Ed Wright, Cypress Inn, Tenn.; two sisters, Mrs. Laura Jones and Mrs. Della Cyper [Cypert], Florence; 14 grandchildren; a great-grandchild. ¶The body will be at Middle Tennessee Funeral home at Collinwood until time for services at Railroad Methodist Church, Wayne County, Sunday at 2 p.m. Rev. George Bracey and Rev. Emerald Bailey will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery.
Eugene C. Turman
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967. No page number on clipping.
Funeral service for Eugene C. Turman, 70, of Arkansas were held recently with burial in Bassett Cemetery. ¶Mr. Turman did at Chickasawba Hospital in Blytheville. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Polk and Molly Dixon Turman. He was a retired farmer. ¶ Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Lucy Turman; two brothers, Frank of Waynesboro and Carl Turman of Collinwood; and a sister, Mrs. Elsie Matlock of Noble, Okla.
Joe Johnson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967. No page number on clipping.
Clifton – Funeral services fo Joe Johnson, 84, were held Saturday at Mt. Carmel Methodist Church with burial in the church cemetery. ¶ Mr. Johnson, retired farmer, died Thursday night in Hardin County General Hospital. ¶He was a lifelong resident of Hardin County. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Minnie Prater Johnson; three daughters, Miss Mary Verna Johnson of Dyer,; Mrs. Hazel Cagel of Adamsville; and Mrs. Kate Droke of Memphis; two son, Flex and Ben Johnson, both of Clifton; a sister, Mrs. Mary Grimes of Clifton; a half-brother, J. W. Hardin of Clifton; and eight grandchildren.
John Thomas Andrews
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967, no page number on clipping.
Funeral Service Thomas Andrews Conducted Sunday
Funeral services for John Thomas Andrews, 92, of Route 5, Waynesboro, were held Sunday, January 22 at 2 o’clock from Highland Methodist Church with Rev. Fred Hosea officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral home in charge of arrangements. ¶ Mr. Andrews died January 19 at his home. ¶He was a native of Morgan County, Alabama, a son of Henry and Nancy Calline Dinkins Andrews. He was a retired former and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Minnie M. Andrews; ten sons, Early and tom of West Point, Chester and James of Waynesboro, Lester of Lawrenceburg, Walter of Loretto, Dewey of Detroit, Mich., Teat Andrews of Collinwood and Franklin and Porter Andrews of Forsythe, Ga.; five daughters, Mrs. Willie Bailey of Summertown, Mrs. Estelle Story of West Point, Mrs. Willodean Gambrell of St. Joseph, Mrs. Myrtle McMullen of Forsythe, Ga., and Mrs. Lillie Mae Dixon of South Gate, Mich.; 58 grandchildren; 64 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Emma Grimes Old
Submitted by the late
Margaret M. Morrison
Source: The Morrison Papers
Mrs. Emma G. Old Dies at Lebanon
Lebanon, Tenn., Oct. 15 – (Special) – Funeral services for Mrs. Emma Grimes Old, 73, were to be conducted this morning at 11:30 from the First Baptist Church with Dr. Alvin H. Hopson, pastor, officiating, assisted by the Rev. Sam Dodson, Jr. pastor of the Lebanon Methodist Church. Burial was to be in the Lebanon Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Old died Thursday night at 7:30 o’clock at her home on East Spring Street, following an illness of several months duration. ¶ A native of Wayne County, she was a daughter of the late Robert A. and Dora Bivins Grimes, and was educated in the public schools of Waynesboro. She moved to Wilson County over 40 years ago with her husband, the late R. L. Old, who operated a store in Watertown for about 25 years before opening his Lebanon store. They moved to Lebanon about 15 years ago. ¶A member of the Baptist Church, she was an ardent church worked until ill health forced her retirement. She was a member of the Womans Missionary Union, Womans Club and the Lebanon Garden Club, in all of which she took an active part. ¶ Survivors are two daughters, Miss Gladys Old and Mrs. Byron Dinges, both of Lebanon; one grandson, David Dinges, of Lebanon; three brothers, J. T. Grimes, of Columbia, Tenn., Alfred and Shields Grimes of Loretta [sic], Tenn.; and three sisters, Misses Elsie and Mayme Grimes and Mrs. Mattie Sills, all of Loretta [sic], Tenn. (Note: Copied from a printed news item in the scrap-book of Mrs. Arthur B. (Ethel Old) Caton, Waynesboro, Tenn.
Mrs. Ora Morrison
Submitted by the late
Margaret M. Morrison
Source: The Morrison Papers
Mrs. Ora Morrison, 68 year-old widow of the late William Seymore Morrison, died Tuesday night at her home on upper Green River after a very brief illness. ¶Mrs. Morrison was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and highly respected. ¶ Survivors are her children, Grayford Morrison, Mrs. C. H. Rose, Cypress Inn, and Mrs. Jesse Duren of the Green River Community. One brother, T. S. Cypert, two sisters, Mrs. Carrie Huckaba, of Lawrenceburg, and Mrs. C. L. Boyd, also survive. ¶Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock at the home by Rev. J. M. Jones of Waynesboro. Burial was in the Shields Cemetery, with the Wayne Funeral Service in charge of arrangements. (Note: Copy from printed news item in the scrap-book of Mrs. Arthur B. (Ethel Old) Caton, Waynesboro, Tenn.) [Note 2: clipping probably from The Wayne County News, 1941, the date of death on Mrs. Morrison’s tombstone, Shields Cemetery.]
James Huckaba
Submitted by the late
Margaret M. Morrison
Source: The Morrison Papers
James Huckaba was born Sept. 6, 1876, died October 4, 1923, at the age of 47 years and 1 month. He professed faith in Christ and united with the Green River Baptist Church of the Indian Creek Association in the year 1899. Mr. Huckaba was married to Miss Carrie Cypert on May 24, 1900. Five children were born to them, Misses Bernice, Lucille and Edyth Huckaba, and two sons, James Thomas and Alfred Merida. Mr. Huckaba was a son of John Fletcher and Mary A. Huckaba, and is survived by his mother, his wife and children and the following sisters and brothers, Mrs. Ellan Lynn, Mrs. Lela Lumpkins and Miss Laura Huckaba, G. M. Huckaba and Edwin F. Huckaba, ¶ Mr. Huckaba had been an invalid for a long time, but was patient and had the loving care of his loved ones throughout his affliction. Funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church in this City Friday afternoon by Dr. W. H. Wood, the following being selected as pall bearers, John Davis, Frank Davis, M. J. Sims, B. J. Alford, R. J. Moore – Freemon & Company undertakers in charge. (Note: Copied from printed news item in the scrap book of Mrs. Arthur B. (Ethel Old) Caton, Waynesboro, Tenn.)
Dr. C. Buchanan
Submitted by the late
Margaret M. Morrison
Source: The Morrison Papers
Dr. C. Buchanan, one of Wayne County’s most prominent and highly respected citizens and a physician of wide repute, departed this life in the Woman’s Hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, on Monday morning at 7:45 o’clock, A.M., November 29, 1920, age seventy-eight years, seven months and nine days, just seven years, seven months and twenty days following the decease of his devoted wife, Ella A. Hassell Buchanan. ¶Failing health for several months had made its impress upon him and gave its warning of impending dissolution. He was doubtless conscious of his serious condition, but neither he nor his friends expected the end so soon. On November 19th, 1920, he left his home for Nashville, Saturday the 20th, he entered the Woman’s Hospital, and on Monday, November 29, after several days of unconsciousness, he passed away. his niece, Miss Adnye Buchanan, and two grand-nieces, Misses Irma and Lorine McAlister, Mrs. Brank Boyd, his deceased wife’s sister, and Wayne Copeland were at his bedside when the final summons came. As peacefully and as quietly as an infant’s slumber, he breathed his last and passed over the Great Divide into the land of eternal rest. his remains were brought to Waynesboro on Tuesday. Funeral services were conducted at the M. E. Church South in the presence of hundreds of his friends, who crowded the church and its approaches to pay their beloved and true friend their last tributes of respect. The occasion was indeed most solemn and affecting. Men and women arose from their seats to state their sense of bereavement and to pay tribute to his memory as a man, as a physician, as a Christian and friend. Beautiful songs were sang by the choir in which were young ladies and young men, by the bedsides of whose mothers he had sat, and with his tenderness and skill had nursed them through the pains and joys of motherhood into health and happiness and hope. Not a dry eye was there, not a lip that did not tremble, not a cheek unbedewed with tears. Beautiful flowers, the remembrance of loving friends, covered the casket in which lay the remains of a man whom the people loved. John Buchanan, of Giles County, his brother, and his niece, Mrs. Meda Brown, of Florence, and his nephew Joe Ussery and niece, Miss Ruby Ussery, of Giles County were present. ¶After the services at the church the remains were interred beside those of his wife in the Hassell cemetery on Green River. A large assembly of friends had also gathered there to pay their last respects to their departed friend, and as the casket was tenderly lowered into the grave tears of sorrow were seen, whispers of love and expressions of gratitude were heard in every part of the grief-stricken crowd. toward the man whom they had known and loved so well. ¶Dr. C. Buchanan was born April 20, 1842 in Giles County, Tenn. He served through the entire Civil War as a Confederate Soldier, in Co. I of the 3rd Tennessee Regiment. After the War, he taught school at Liberty school house in Lawrence County, Tenn. He attended medical college at Nashville and later at Louisville. In 1868, he located at Waynesboro, and began the practice of medicine, in which he continued until the end. In August, 1872, he married Ella A. Hassell, the daughter of A. T. Hassell, of Waynesboro, the ceremony being performed by Bishop McTyre of the M. E. Church South. His wife preceded him to the place of final reunion on the 9th day of April, 1913. Since then, he has lived at the old home place in Waynesboro with his niece, Miss Adnye Buchanan. ¶He is survived by two brothers, John Buchanan, of Giles County, and Frank P. Buchanan, of Hutchins, Texas, and the children of two deceased brothers, Judge D. Buchanan of Lawrenceburg, and J. P. Buchanan of Giles County. The children of Judge Buchanan are, Lonnie, Solon, Walter, Frank, Sam and John. The children of J. P. Buchanan are William, Clarence, Clara, Ella, Annie, Adnya, Meda, James, and Roy. ¶Wayne County never had truer, better, braver man, and no man ever had a more loyal and devoted friend. He was sympathetic, gentle and kind, and yet when duty called or when be believed he was right, he followed the convictions with unflinching courage and unswearving fidelity. He was a faithful and liberal member of the M. E. Church, South and one of the teachers in the Sunday School. (Note: Copied from a printed article in the scrap-book of Mrs. Arthur B. (Ethel Old) Caton, Waynesboro, Tenn.)
Mrs. Lennie Whitten
Submitted by
Bill Page
Source: Dallas Morning News, March 30, 1906, p. 10.
Whitten – Midlothian, Texas, March 27 – Mrs. Lennie Whitten died here this afternoon of pneumonia.  She would have been 80 years old on August 3.  She was born near Florence, Alabama, on August 3, 1826.  She leaves a daughter, Mrs. J. F. Belew of this place, and a son, Rev. Leander Whitten of Russellville, Alabama.
Mrs. Mattie Brewer McCorkle
McCorkle-Stafford Collection
Wayne County Historical Society
Source: clipping pasted to inside cover of Bible. Probably from Florence Times, 8/9 Aug 1953.
MRS. MATTIE MCCORKLE DIES IN BIRMINGHAM
Mrs. Mattie BREWER McCORKLE, wife of the late William J. McCORKLE, who was a resident of Florence for a number of years, passed away at her home in Birmingham Thursday night. ¶She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. A. STAFFORD and Mrs. R. Brent BUTCHER, both of Birmingham; three granddaughters, one step-granddaughter, and one step-grandson. ¶The funeral services were held at the home in Birmingham at three o’clock Saturday afternoon, after which the body will be brought to Florence and remain in Brown Service Chapel until time for the graveside service at 2 p.m. Sunday. ¶Interment will be in the Florence cemetery with Rev. L. E. KELLEY conducting the service. The family requests that no flowers be sent.
Cecil Thompson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
18 Aug 1967 page not recorded on clipping.
Final Rites For Cecil Thompson Held On Aug. 13
Funeral services for Cecil Thompson, 65, of Collinwood were held Aug. 13 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home with Roger Villines officiating. ¶Burial was in McGlamery cemetery. ¶Mr. Thompson died Aug. 11 at Coffee Memorial Hospital [Florence, AL]. ¶He was a native of Lawrence County, a son of William C. and Laura Moore Thompson. He was a retired TVA employee, a member of the Masonic and Eastern Star Orders of Collinwood, a member of Woodmen of the World and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Annine Lura Pitts Thompson; one half-brother, Ishmael Thompson of Florence, Ala.; two nieces and a nephew.
Willie D. McLin
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News,
18 Aug 1967, no page number of clipping.
Funeral Service For W. D. McLin Conducted Aug. 15
Funeral services for Willie D. McLin, 67, of West Hollywood, Fla., were conducted Aug. 15 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home with Elton Cartner officiating. ¶Burial was in Mt. Hebron Cemetery. ¶Mr. McLin died Aug. 11 at South Broward Hospital in Dania, Fla. ¶He was a native of Hardin County, a son of Carrol and Annie Shelly McLin. He was a retired farmer and member of the Free Will Baptist Church. ¶Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Lena Clay McLin; four sons, Edward E. of Miami, Herbert L. and Bennie of West Hollywood, and Jimmy of U.S. Navy stationed in Vietnam; two daughters, Mrs. Ralph Burns of Clilfton and Mrs. Danny Poe of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; a brother, Carl McLin and a sister Mrs. [rest of clipping cut off]
Eddie Burt Simon
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News
18 Aug 1967, no page number of clipping.
Final Rites For Eddie Burt Simon Pine Hill Church
Funeral services for Eddie Bert Simon, 84, of Lutts, were held August 2 at 2 o’clock from Pine Hill Church of Christ with Ed Clark officiating. ¶Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Simon died July 31 at Colonial Manor Nursing Home in Florence. [Alabama] ¶He was a native of Lauderdale County, Alabama, but had spent almost his entire life in Wayne County. His parents were John and Mary White Simon. He was a retired farmer and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Odella Bevis Simon of Lutts; two sons, Wayne and Clifford Simon of Florence; five daughters, Mrs. Cleo Farris of Florence, Mrs. Roy Miles of Cloverdale, Alabama, Mrs. Elihu Martin of Lutts, Mrs. Vernon Pigg of South Bend, Indiana, and Mrs. Charles Holt of Tulsa, Oklahoma; twenty-nine grandchildren and thirty-two great-grandchildren. ¶Pallbearers were Dan and Charles Simon, Harold and Horace Pigg, and Grandville and Gary Farris.
Charlie Goodman
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 16 June 1967, no page number on clipping.
Final Rites for Charlie Goodman Conducted Friday
Final Rites for Charlie Allen Goodman, 84, of Route 3, Waynesboro were conducted Friday, June 9 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home with Barney Webb officiating. Burial was in Oak Ridge Cemetery. ¶Mr. Goodman died June 7 at Wayne General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Daniel and Mary Ann Goodman. He was a retired former and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include two sons, Lester of Nashville and Dewey Goodman of Hohenwald; three daughters, Mrs. Ruby Perry of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Naomi Aiken of Torrance, Calif., and Mrs. Jewell Walker of Cicero, Ill; 19 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren.
John Warrington
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 26 May 1967, no page number on clipping.
Final Rites For John Warrington Conducted Friday
Final rites for John W. Warrington, 87, of Savannah, were conducted Friday, May 19, at 2 o’clock from Mt. Carmel Church with Sonny Barber officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Warrington died May 18 at Hardin County Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Thomas and Fannie Nunley Warrington. He was a retired farmer. ¶Survivors include two sons, Ernest of Lutts and Glenn Warrington of Savannah; two daughters, Miss Margaret Warrington and Mrs. Sally White both of Tuscumbia, Ala.; a brother, Walter Warrington of Columbia; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Davis of Savannah and Mrs. Mamie Hardin of Clifton; eight grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren.
John Henry Lindsey
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 16 May 1967, no page number on clipping.
Former Wayne Resident Dies In Chattanooga
Funeral services for John Henry Lindsey, 90, of Chattanooga, were held Thursday, May 25 at 11 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral home Chapel with Rev. J. W. Daniel officiating. Burial was in Macedonia Cemetery in Lawrence County. ¶Mr. Lindsey died May 22 at Erlanger Hospital in Chattanooga. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Lindsey. He was a retired carpenter and a member of the Methodist Church. ¶Survivors include two son, Horace and Hugh Lindsey of Chattanooga; eight grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.
Lonnie Hinton
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 16 June 1967, no page number on clipping.
Funeral Service McGlamery Church For Lonnie Hinton
Funeral services for Lonnie Hinton, 84, of Collinwood were held Wednesday, June 7 at 2 o’clock from McGlamery Church with Rev. J. W. Daniel officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Hinton died June 5 at his home. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Zep and Betty Martin Hinton. He was a retired farmer and a member of the Church of God. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Sally Ann Fraley Hinton of Collinwood, a son, Glen Hinton of Mishawaka, Ind.; three daughters, Mrs. Velma Vicsek of Mishawaka, Ind., Mrs. Bessie Bratton of Gary, Ind., and Mrs. Ethel Staggs of Collinwood; a brother, Ed Hinton of Mishawaka, Ind.; 24 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren.
Elijah Edward Devers
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 2 June 1967, no page number on clipping.
Funeral Services For E. E. Devers Conducted Tuesday
Funeral services for Elijah Edward Devers, 85, of Clifton were conducted Tuesday, May 30 at 3 o’clock from Evans Chapel Methodist Church with Sonny Barber officiating. ¶Mr. Devers died May 28 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County and a retired farmer. ¶Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Rosie Dicus Devers; a son Nathan Devers of Amory, Miss; two daughters, Mrs. Alice Davidson of La Grange and Mrs. Ora Stricklin of Waynesboro; a stepson, Claude Albert Wood, of Clifton; a brother, Will Devers of Waynesboro; three sisters, Mrs. Della Todd, Mrs. Lizzie Shaw and Mrs. Hettie Peacock all of Waynesboro; six grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Maie Pulley
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967, no page number on clipping
Final Rites For Mrs. Maie Pulley Held On Saturday
Final rites for Mrs. Maie Pulley, 76, of Route 3, Waynesboro were conducted Saturday, January 21 at 1 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Fred Hosea officiating. Burial was in Walnut Grove Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Pulley died January 20 at Wayne General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Andy and Mandy DeVasure Long. She was a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include her husband, Dick Pulley; four sons, Monroe of Waynesboro, and C. G., James and Frank Pulley all of Dover, Ohio; four daughters, Mrs. Edna Howe of Waynesboro, Mrs. Annie L. York and Mrs. Maxine Lovell of Dover, Ohio; and Mrs. Grace Ellis of Indiana; three sisters, Mrs. Tammy Pulley and Mrs. Gertrude Morgan of Waynesboro and Mrs. Loue Frazier of Oklahoma; a brother, Charlie Long of Waynesboro; 36 grandchildren and 32 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Flora Jane Thompson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967, no page number on clipping.
Final Rites Are Held Sunday For Mrs. Thompson
Final rites for Mrs. Flora Jane Thompson, 78, of Route 2, Collinwood were conducted Sunday, January 22 at 2:30 from Butler Grove Baptist Church. Rev. Willie Daniel officiating with burial in the church cemetery, Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mrs. Thompson died January 21 at Wayne General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Solomon D. and Darcas Jane Daniels. ¶Survivors include two sons, James of Joplin, Mo., and Vernie L. Thompson of Fallbrook, Calif.; five daughters, Mrs. Rosie Stooksberry of Jonesboro, Ark, Mrs. Vergie Daniel of Collinwood, Mrs. Ruby Price of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Bertie Heard of Route 2, Collinwood and Mrs. Eliase Parker of Waynesboro; three sisters, Mrs. Fronie Butler of Collinwood, Mrs. Missie Butler of Waynesboro and Mrs. Lou Anna Butler of Iron City; 30 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren.
Bruce Poag
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Jan 1967, no page number on clipping.
Funeral Services For Bruce Poag Highland Church
Funeral Services for Bruce Poag, 88, of Route 4, Waynesboro, were conducted Thursday, January 19 at 2 o’clock from Highland Methodist Church with Rev. B. B. Powers officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Poag died January 16 in Blytheville Hospital in Arkansas. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of James S. and Laura Bush Poag. He was a retired farmer and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include three sons, Roy of Osceola, Ark., James of Route 4, Waynesboro and Hughes Poag of Manilla, Ark.; four daughters, Mrs. Mary Crews of Waynesboro, Mrs. Verna Hollis of Turlock, Calif., Mrs. Maggie Tolle of Toledo, Ohio, and Mrs. Laura Gobbell of Truman, Ark.; a sister, Mrs. Ethel Hargett of Cherokee, Ala.; 22 grandchildren, 54 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.
Robert T. (Bob Taylor) Gallaher
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, Friday, April 4, 1969, no page number on clipping.
Rites for Bob Taylor Gallaher Held March 29
Funeral services for Robert T. (Bob Taylor) Gallaher were conducted Mar. 29 at 1:30 from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home chapel, with burial in Gallaher cemetery on Factory Creek. ¶Mr. Gallaher, 83, of Route 5, Waynesboro, died Mar. 27, at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶ He was a native of Wayne County, son of John L. and Sarah Jane Hollis Gallaher. He was a retired farmer, a member of the Baptist Church and a member of Waynesboro Masonic Lodge. ¶Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Ann Cole Gallaher; two daughters, Mrs. Edwinna Stricklin of Lutts, and Mrs. Frances Jane Moore of Waynesboro; a brother, Will Gallaher of Leoma; two sisters, Mrs. Mattie Moore of Waynesboro and Mrs. Georgia Jackson of Paducah, Texas; and two grandchildren.
Mrs. Sallie Hardin Whitehead
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 12 Jan 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Sally Hardin Whitehead
Final rites for Mrs. Sally Hardin Whitehead, 80, of Waynesboro were conducted Sunday, January 7, at 2 o’clock from Waynesboro Church of Christ with Truman Keith officiating. ¶Burial was in Shields Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral home in charge. ¶Mrs. Whitehead died January 6 at Vanderbilt Hospital in Nashville after suffering severe burns. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Charlie and Mollie Barnett Hardin. She was a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include two sons, Stenitt and Herman Whitehead both of Waynesboro; four daughters, Mrs. Carline Gannon and Mrs. Hattie Duren of Waynesboro, Mrs. Arlie Griffin of Hohenwald and Mrs. Christine Smith of Milford, Mich.; a step-daughter, Mrs. Opal Kelley of Hurtsboro, Ala.; a brother, Jim Hardin of Detroit, Mich.; three sisters, Mrs. Herschel Nutt of Lawrenceburg, Mrs. Lora Lee of Waynesboro, and Mrs. Pearl Anderson of Hohenwald; 35 grandchildren; 70 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. ¶Pallbearers were Jimmy Paul Whitehead, J. T. Cannon, Billy Joe Duren, Charles Griffin and Franklin and Junior Lee.
Mrs. Roxie Viola Balentine
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 12 Jan 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Roxie Viola Balentine
Funeral services for Mrs. Roxie Viola Balentine, 83, of Florence, Alabama were conducted Sunday, January 7, at 2 o’clock from Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church with Rev. Emerald Bailey and Rev. J. W. Daniel officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. ¶Mrs. Balentine died January 4 at Wayne General Hospital after a long illness. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Joe Thomas and Sarah Davis Creasy. She was a member of Pentecostal Holiness Church at Florence, Ala. ¶Survivors include a son, Birdie Balentine of Iron City; six daughters, Mrs. Goldier Corum of Humboldt, Mrs. Icy Pilkington of Savannah, Mrs. Girdie Irby and Mrs. Emma Jane Moore both of Collinwood, Mrs. Lyda Murl Phillips of Cypress Inn and Mrs. Mary Henson of Florence, Ala.; two brothers, Baysdon Creasy of Iron City and Rich Creasy of Nashville; a sister, Mrs. Callie Vickery of Florence, Ala; 25 grandchildren and 37 great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Sarah O. Stooksberry
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County New, 12 Jan 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Sarah O. Stooksberry
Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah Orbadean Stooksberry, 41, of Waynesboro were held Friday, January 5 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral home Chapel with Fred Hosea officiating. Burial was in McGee Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Stooksberry died January 3 at a Western State Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Frank and Zada Clay Dugger of Waynesboro, who survive. She was a member of the Bethel Baptist Church. ¶Additional survivors include her husband, James Stooksberry of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Three brothers, Joe and Paul Dugger of Waynesboro and Howard Dugger of Columbia; three sisters, Mrs. J. M. Clayton and Mrs. Herman Thompson of Waynesboro, and Mrs. Willard Creamer of Florence, Ala.
Raymond G. Morris
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 12 Jan 1968, no page number on clipping
Raymond G. Morris
Final rites for Raymond G. Morris, 48, of Mishawaka, Ind., were held Friday, January 5 at 11 o’clock from Lutts Community Church with C. M. Robbins of Savannah officiating. ¶Burial was in Shiloh National Military Park with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. ¶Mr. Morris died January 2 at a South Bend, Ind. hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of R. W. and Ola Hodges Morris of Lutts, who survive. He was a factory worker and a veteran of World War II. ¶Survivors in addition to his parents are his wife, Mrs. Lessie Kilburn Morris of Mishawaka, ind.; two sons, Raymond Glen and Ronald Lynn Morris both of Mishawaka, inc.; two brothers, Reeder of Cypress Inn and Doyle Morris of Lutts; two sisters, Mrs. C. M. Daniel of Lutts, and Mrs. J. R. Combs of Savannah; and two grandchildren.
Mrs. Nora Middleton Knight
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 12 Jan 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Nora Middleton Knight
Funeral services for Mrs. Nora Middleton Knight, 74, of the Culp’s Chapel Community, were held at 1 o’clock January 2 at Culp’s Chapel Methodist Church. Burial was in the Church cemetery. ¶Mrs. Knight died December 31 at Hardin County General Hospital. ¶Survivors are four brothers, Ernie and Bill Middleton of Blytheville, Arkansas; Danny Middleton of Culp’s Chapel, and Jesse Middleton of Corinth, Mississippi; and two sisters, Mrs. Fronie Culp of Culp’s Chapel and Mrs. Carrie Parker of Clifton.
Harry L. Stull
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Dec 1968, no page number on clipping.
Harry L. Stull
Funeral services for Harry Lancaster Stull, 72, retired electrician and plumber of Waynesboro were conducted Dec. 23 at 1 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Reverend Robert Shelton officiating. Burial was in the Clifton Cemetery. ¶Mr. Stull died Dec. 21 at Veterans Hospital in Nashville. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of William P. and Martha Lancaster Stull. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, a Mason and a veteran of World War I. ¶Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Clara Hughes Stull, a daughter, Mrs. Martha Lillian Deller of Knoxville; a granddaughter, Miss Jennifer Deller of Knoxville and a sister, Miss Elizabeth Stull of Savannah.
Mrs. Margaret E. Reed
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Dec 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Margaret E. Reed
Funeral services for Mrs. Margaret E. Reed, 87, of Collinwood were conducted December 24 at 1 o’clock from Butler Grove Church with Rev. George Kelley officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home directing. ¶ Mrs. Reed died Dec. 23 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Thomas J. and Sarah Jane Landcaster Thompson. She was member of Macedonia Baptist Church. ¶Surviving are a son, Ernest Reed, a daughter, Mrs. Rosie Jones and a brother, Monroe Thompson, all of Collinwood; a sister, Mrs. Tilda Martin of Waynesboro; 11 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
Michael L. Johnson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Dec 1968, no page number on clipping.
Michael L. Johnson
Graveside services for Michael L. Johnson, three weeks, were conducted Dec. 23 at 2 o’clock at Centenary Cemetery with Nick White officiating. Middle Tennessee Funeral home was in charge. ¶Survivors include his parents, James M. and Jeraldine Fowler Johnson of Oxford, Ala; two brothers, Kenneth and Paul Johnson of the home and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Johnson of Lutts, and Mrs. Harriet Barber of McColl, S.C.
Mrs. Plina Elizabeth (Lizzie) Thompson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 27 Dec 1968, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. P. Elizabeth Thompson
Final rites for Mrs. Plina Elizabeth (Lizzie) Thompson, 81, of Champaign, Ill, were held Dec 23 at 10 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. B. B. Powers officiating. Burial was in Walker Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Thompson died Dec. 20 at Leonard Nursing Home. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of john and Mary Helton Throgmorton. She was a Baptist Faith. ¶Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Mary Lou Smith of Champaign, Ill; four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
William C. Flippo
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 28 Feb 1969, no page number on clipping.
William C. Flippo
Funeral services for William C. Flippo, 80, of Route 6, Waynesboro were conducted February 27 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Burney Webb officiating. Burial was in Memory Gardens. ¶Mr. Flippo died Feb 25 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Lawrence County, a son of John and Amanda Hill Flippo. He was a retired farmer and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Mary Seiber Flippo; four sons, Ford of Inkster, Mich., W. C. Jr. of Waynesboro, James of Ft. Campbell, Ky., and Leon Flippo of the home; six daughters, Mrs. Madalene Leftwich of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Pauline Camper of Warren, Mich., Mrs. Mattie Skelton of Waynesboro, Mrs. Senia Skelton of South Gate, Mich., Mrs. Normaline Bouchard of Wyandotte, Mich., and Mrs. Ruby Faye Hammack of Trenton, Mich.; a sister, Mrs. Herbert Jones of Waynesboro; a stepson, William Travis Hicks of Dearborn Heights, Mich., 25 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren and four step-grandchildren.
Miss Lizzie Davis
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 4 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
Miss Lizzie Davis
Funeral services for Miss Lizzie Davis, 83, of Clifton were conducted April 3 at 2 o’clock from First Baptist Church with Rev. B. B. Powers and Rev. King Thetford officiating. Burial was in Memorial Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Miss Davis died April 1 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Waynesboro, a daughter of J. N. and Nancy Copeland Davis. She was a former school teacher and had taught Sunday School for many years at First Baptist Church where she was a member. ¶Survivors include a number of nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews.
Terry Reese
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 4 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
Terry Reese
Final rites for Terry Finn Reece, 11, of Florence, Ala. were conduced March 29 at 2 o’clock from Forrest Hills Baptist Church with Rev. Hatcht and Rev. Helms officiating. Burial was in Tri-City Memorial Gardens. ¶Young Terry fell dead in a neighbor’s yard March 27. ¶He was a native of Florence, Ala., son of Robert and Geraldine Beckham Reese who survive. He was a fifth grade student at Harlem High School. ¶Other survivors include three brothers, Bobby, Brian and Kevin all of the home and grandmothers, Mrs. Lorene Redmon of Waynesboro and Mrs. Robert Reese of Huntsville, Ala.
Joe Pat Roberts
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 4 Apr 1969, no page number on clipping.
Joe Pat Roberts
Final rites for Joe Pat Roberts, 53, of Sheffield, Ala. were conducted March 29 at 2 o’clock from Second Baptist Church with Rev. R. E. Mayo and Rev. Thomas Thornton officiating. Burial was in Sheffield Oakwood Cemetery. ¶Mr. Roberts died March 27 at Shoals Hospital after an illness of four months. ¶He was a native of Marshall County but had made his home in Sheffield for the past 23 years. He was an employee with the Power Department for 19 years and a member of Second Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Ovalee Cook Roberts; a step-son, Jimmy Baccus of Sheffield; a step-daughter, Mrs. A. Borden of Colbert Heights, and a number of brothers and sisters.
Jesse Bundy Wilson
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 4 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
Jesse B. Wilson
Funeral services for Jesse Bundy Wilson, 78, of Collinwood were conducted March 30 at 2 o’clock from Cromwell Crossroads Church with Richard Taylor and J. W. Daniel officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mr. Wilson died march 28 at St. Thomas Hospital in Nashville. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of John F. and Mary Pigg Wilson. He was a cabinet maker by trade and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Melvin Rich of Nashville; four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Pairsada Crowe
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 11 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Pairsada Crowe
Final rites for Mrs. Pairsada Crowe, 84, of Paducah, Ky. were conducted April 4 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Henry J. Golson officiating. Burial was in Boyd Cemetery. ¶Mrs. Crowe died April 2 at Madisonville Kentucky Hospital. ¶She was a native of Lewis County, a daughter of Dock and Sally Edwards Barbour. She was a member of the Methodist Church. ¶Survivors include five sons, Clovis of Paducah, Ky., Edward of Chicago, Ill., Willard of Detroit, Mich., Loyd of Houston, Texas. and Farris Crowe of Nashville; 19 grandchildren and a number of great-grandchildren.
John R. Faulkner
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 11 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
John R. Faulkner
Funeral services for John R. Faulkner, 49, of Chicago, Ill, were conducted April 8 at one o’clock from Cromwell Cross Roads Church with Rev. R. E. Pugh officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mr. Faulkner died April 5 at his home. ¶He was a native of Hardin County, a son of Mrs. Fanny Warrington Faulkner of Lutts and the late Elisha Faulkner. He was a tool and die maker by trade and a member of Lutts Methodist Church. ¶Survivors in addition to his mother are a brother, Grady Faulkner of Mishawaka, Ind., and two sisters, Mrs. Richard Horton and Mrs. Althea House of Lutts.
Marlon Wesley Lockard
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 18 April 1969, no page number on clipping.
M. Wesley Lockard
Funeral services for Marlon Wesley Lockard, 64, of Lutts were conducted April 16 at 2 o’clock from Cromwell Cross Roads Church with Rev. Walker Rich of Savannah officiating. ¶Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Lockard died unexpectedly April 14 at his home. ¶He was a native of Pemiscot County Missouri, a son of James Wesley and Ida Decker Lockard. he was a farmer and a member of the Free Will Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Ruby Horton Lockard, a son, Bas E. Lockard of Waynesboro; a daughter, Mrs. Mamie Risner of Lutts; a brother, John Alvin Lockard of Hornersville, Mo.; a sister Mrs. Othie Scott of Collinwood and eight grandchildren.
Mrs. Tennie Elizabeth Cole Martin
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 25 April 1969, page 7.
Mrs. Tennie Martin
Funeral services for Mrs. Tennie Elizabeth Cole Martin of Waynesboro were conducted April 20 at 2:30 from First Baptist Church with Rev. King Thetford officiating, assisted by Rev. B. B. Powers. ¶Burial was in Greenwood Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mrs. Martin died April 18 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶She was a native of Wayne County, a daughter of Addison W. and Emma McKinnon Cole. She was a retired school teacher, bookkeeper for Hassell and Hughes, and employee of the City of Waynesboro, and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include three sisters, Mrs. Ethel Turman, Mrs. Bess Belew, and Mrs. Grace Morrow all of Waynesboro; three step-sons, Walter Martin of Albuquerque, N.M., Tommy A. Martin of Chattanooga, and Roy Martin of Florence, Ala.; three step-daughters, Mrs. Lula Jackson of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Beulah Taylor of Collinwood and Mrs. Mae Mulligan of Florence, Ala.; a number of nieces and nephews.
Noah Webster Martin
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 25 April 1969, page 7.
Noah W. Martin
Final rites for Noah Webster Martin, 65, of Collinwood were conducted April 22 at 2 o’clock from Collinwood Methodist Church with Rev. J. W. Daniel and Rev. Paul Z. Ball officiating. Burial was in McGlamery Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mr. Martin died April 20 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of David H. and Lousette Blair Martin. He was a carpenter and a member of the Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include two sons, David Henry and James Ronnie and a daughter Bertie Aileen Martin all of the home; two brothers, Charlie of Pulaski and Luther Martin of Collinwood; two sisters, Mrs. Lola Prohart of Ajo, Arizona and Mrs. Eunice Barnett of Collinwood; and several nieces and nephews.
Billie Stricklin
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 25 April 1969, page 7.
Billie Stricklin
Funeral services for Billie Stricklin, 44, of Route 2, Lutts, were conducted April 22 at 2 o’clock from Cromwell Cross Roads Church with Rev. Thurman Stults and Rev. Elton Cotner officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Stricklin died April 20 at Wayne County General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of W. T. and Mattie Brown Stricklin. He was an employee of Collinwood Manufacturing Company, a veteran of World War II and a member of Free Will Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his wife, Jewell Melson Stricklin; three daughters, Margaret, Frances and Billie Ann Stricklin all of the home; two brothers, James of Lutts and David Stricklin of Adamsville; and two sisters, Mrs. Marie Phillips of Shiloh and Mrs. Flora Jean Melson of Adamsville.
William Arthur Vickery
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 25 April 1969, page 7.
William A. Vickery
Funeral services for William Arthur Vickery, 53, of Jackson, Miss. were conducted April 18 at 2 o’clock from Lindsey Chapel Church. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mr. Vickery died April 16 at his home. ¶He was a native of Lauderdale County, Ala., a son of John A. and Ona Balentine Vickery. He was a construction worker and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors are a daughter, Mrs. Shirley Jean Seltzer of San Francisco, Calif.; four sisters, Mrs. Cora Balentine; Mrs. Ola Tomlin and Mrs. Alice Nichols all of Mishawaka, Ind.; and Mrs. Beatrice Broyles of Savannah; two grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Ernest Floyd Adams
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 25 April 1969, page 7.
Ernest Floyd Adams
Final rites for Ernest Floyd Adams, 60, of Route 5, Waynesboro were conducted April 19 at 1:30 from Fishtrap Church with Rev. Richard Bailey officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements. ¶Mr. Adams died April 17 at his home. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of William D. and Docia Dial Adams. He was a farmer, a member of the Wayne County School Board and a Methodist. ¶Survivors include his wife, Sula Mae Carden Adams; two sons, James W. of Savannah, Ga.; and Amos S. Adams of Waynesboro; a daughter, Mrs. Lou Nell Dean of Louisville, Ky.; four half-brothers, Herman Adams of Earl, Ark., Richard Adams of Augusta, Ark., James Earl Adams of West Helena, Ark., and Arnold Adams of La Porte, Ind.; four half-sisters, Mrs. Willie Mae Grable of Bell Gardens, Calif., Mrs. Louise Hardy of West Memphis, Ark., Mrs. Leona Burk of Little Rock, Ark., and Mrs. Esterlean Golden of Proctor, Ark., and two grandchildren.
Mrs. Eula Pitts Waters Walker
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 9 May 1969, no page number on clipping.
Mrs. Eula Walker
Final rites for Mrs. Eula Pitts Waters Walker of Clifton were held May 1 at 10 a.m. at Mt. Carmel Methodist Church. ¶Rev. G. C. Self officiated with burial in the church cemetery. ¶Mrs. Walker died Apr. 29, in Hardin County Hospital at Savanna. ¶She was a native of Wayne County and had lived most of her life in Clifton. She was a daughter of the late Dona Ellis and J. J. Pitts. ¶Survivors include a son, Jack Waters of Nashville; two daughters, Mrs. Louise Walker of Cerro Gordo, and Mrs. Ruth Wilson of Savannah; three sisters, Mrs. Gertie Phillips of Rienzi, Miss., Mrs. Charlie Davis of Waynesboro, and Mrs. Lillian Long of Savannah; and a grandson, Capt. James Jeter of Warner Robbins AFB, Georgia.
Vance Drake Lynch
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 9 May 1969, no page number on clipping.
Vance Drake Lynch
Final rites for Vance Drake Lynch, 5, little son of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Lynch of Waynesboro were conducted May 2 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. H. H. Hurst officiating. Burial was in Mt. Hope Cemetery. ¶The child was killed Wednesday afternoon, April 30 in an automobile accident. ¶Survivors in addition to the parents are two brothers, Lance Price and Jerry Anthony and a sister Dawn Marie all of the home; and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Roy Westergaard of Berkeley, Calif.; and Mrs. Lillian Lynch of Waynesboro.
William S. Nance
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 9 May 1969, no page number on clipping.
William S. Nance
Funeral services for William S. Nance, 60, of Matthews, Mo. were conducted May 4 at 2 o’clock from Nunnelee Funeral Chapel in Sikeston, Mo. The Rev. Ellis A. Grant officiated with burial in the Garden of Memories Cemetery. ¶Mr. Nancy died May 2 at Methodist Hospital in Memphis after a short illness. ¶He was a native of Nancy Bend Community in Hardin County, a son of William S. and Emma Nancy. He was a farmer and a member of the Little Vine General Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Mary Northcutt Nancy, seven children; a brother, Benham Nancy of Savannah; and give grandchildren.
Archie E. Holt
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 13 June 1969, no page number on clipping.
Archie E. Holt
Funeral services for Archie E. Holt, 74, of Elkhart, Indiana were conducted June 6 at 2 o’clock from Metz Funeral home with Earl Cook officiating. ¶Burial was in Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens. ¶Mr. Holt died June 4 at Elkhart General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County but had made his home in Elkhart for the past 24 years. He was a member of the Willowdale Church of Christ. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Dona Holt; four sons, Weston J. of Lawrenceburg; James D. of South Bend, Ind.; Everett E. of Elkhart; and Gilbert S. of Bloomington; four daughters, Mrs. Esther Harder of Lewisburg, Mrs. Ruby Hunsberger of Elkhart, Mrs. Marle Morrow of Lawrenceburg, and Mrs. Viva Roberts of Chattanooga; four brothers, Marvin and Arvil Holt of Cypress Inn and Erate and Warren Holt both of Florence, Ala.; six sisters, Mrs. Hattie Bevis, Cloverdale, Ala., Mrs. Ethel McFall of Lawrenceburg, Mrs. Addie Gilchrist and Mrs. Odie McFall of Cypress Inn, Mrs. Ollie McFall of Ethridge, Mrs. Essie Mahan of Cloverdale, Ala.; 13 grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren.
William Pose Butler
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 13 June 1969, no page number on clipping.
William Pose Butler
Final rites for William Pose Butler, 81, of Rt. 2, Iron City were conducted June 7 at 2 o’clock from Butler Grove Church with Rev. J. W. Daniel officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge. ¶Mr. Butler died June 5 at Lawrence County General Hospital. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Jim and Bon Martin Butler. He was a retired farmer and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Lillie Daniel Butler; two son, Jimmy and Iron City and Johnny Butler of Lawrenceburg; three daughters, Mrs. John Holt and Mrs. Walter Brison both of Collinwood, and Mrs. Melvin Thompson of Iron City; three brothers, Wess and Henry of Collinwood, and Harvey Butler of Iron City; a half-brother, Ernest Butler of Birmingham, Ala.; a sister, Mrs. Annie Thompson of Collinwood, 26 grandchildren; 33 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.
Willie White, Jr.
Submitted by
Edgar D. Byler, III
Source: Wayne County News, 13 June 1969, no page number on clipping.
Willie White, Jr.
Funeral services for Willie White, Jr., 31, of Waynesboro were conducted June 7 at 2 o’clock from Middle Tennessee Funeral Home with Thomas Roper officiating, assisted by Mr. White’s nephew, Bobby White. ¶Burial was in Cromwell Cross Roads Cemetery. ¶Mr. White died June 5 at his home. ¶He was a native of Wayne County, a son of Willie White, Sr. of Waynesboro, who survives and the late Osa Atkinson White. He was a machinist at Ford Motor Company in Detroit, Mich., and a member of the Baptist Church. ¶Survivors in addition to his father are his wife, Mrs. Katherine M. Scalf White; two daughters Layra Kay and Lisa Annette of the home; five brothers, Bill and Dan of Nashville, J. T. and Joel of Ypsilanti, Mich.; and Iley White of Chicago, Ill., five sisters, Mrs. Marie Pope of Waynesboro, Mrs. Azlee Stanfield of Savannah, Mrs. Waymon Moser of Collinwood, Mrs. Susie West of Ypsilanti and Mrs. Monetta Ellison of Warrior, Ala.
Little Juanita Hassell
Submitted by
Don Meredith
Source: Clifton Times
Clifton, Tennessee
Thursday, December 20, 1894
Vol. XXI    No. 43
Page 3
Little Juanita Hassell
At 11 o’clock last Monday morning little Juanita Hassell died after about 60 hours of untold suffering from an attack of the croop.
Funeral Services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon and the burial took place in the Clifton cemetery.
All the physicians in town were in attendance, and Dr. Buchanan of Waynesboro was called Friday night.  At 12 o’clock, the only hope to save it was to perform tracheotomy, which means the insertion of a tube into the windpipe.  Through this, the little sufferer breathed a living death until Monday at 11 o’clock.
She was the idolized of her parents and the pet and pride of almost every one in Clifton.  An interesting and intelligent child, far above the ordinary, with a disposition that was purity and innocence itself, it is not surprising that the universal sympathy in her death should touch the brinks of grief.  There is not a person in Clifton who would not make any sacrifice to show these dear parents how deeply they deplore the death of their child, and who would not willingly help to bear the burden of this bereavement.  Words and language fail the writer in expressing the depth and sincerity of the sympathy he feels for these parents whose numerous kindnesses have afforded him numberless pleasures and whose devotion to their only child has often been an object of his admiration.
She is gone but not forgotten.  The love that belongs to those children whom Divinity has taken to himself is a chord as strong as bands of steel that bind us to the hope of rest beyond this tide of tribulations, and a ladder by which we mount to the heights of His eternal promises.
Charles F. Pennington
Submitted by
Don Meredith
Source:
The Wayne County News
Friday, December 27, 1940
Page 1
PENNINGTON, FORMER RESIDENT HERE: DEAD
Dies Following Injuries Received in Altercation with Bill Lawhead
¶Charles F. Pennington, a former resident of Waynesboro, and well known here died in the U.S. Veteran’s Hospital in Memphis Monday morning where he had been taken for treatment for injuries received in an altercation near Hohenwald late last week.
¶It is reported that the difficulty occurred at the farm of Mr. Pennington adjoining the Meriwether Lewis Park about six miles east of Hohenwald.  One Bill Lawhead, of Indianapolis, Indiana, had been making his home with Pennington for some time following a disappointment in a business venture in Lewis County, and was at work for Mr. Pennington erecting a house when an argument arose over a settlement, resulting in the injuries causing his death.
¶Mr. Pennington received his early education here, where he resided with his father, Robert Pennington, and members of his family until his early manhood.  He entered the United States Railway mail service and was assigned from Jellico to Knoxville in East Tennessee.  While laying over at Knoxville during the days he was on duty, he entered the University of Tennessee Law department, and graduated there some years ago.
¶After the close of the World War in which Mr. Pennington volunteered his services, He opened a law office at Hohenwald, and was actively engaged in the practice of his profession there.  He has appeared before the courts here on numerous occasions, and was widely known here where he has a number of relatives.  During his service for his country he was assigned to the Transportation service and crossed the Atlantic Ocean several times with convoys.  He entered the ranks as a private but was promoted to the rank of Major before the close of the war, and was holding that commission when he received his honorable discharge from service.
¶Mr. Pennington is survived by one brother, George Pennington of Napier and one half brother of Old Hickory, also two sisters and one half sister, Mrs. Frank Scott, Ruppertown, Mrs. Mora Crews and Mrs. Jess Barber.
¶He was buried at Napier, in Lewis County, near his boyhood home.
Rev. Daniel Judd
Submitted by
Steven Elder
Source: “Christian Advocate”
Nashville, TN
23 Aug 1860
Rev. Daniel Judd
As announced in your columns, this good man has gone from labor to reward. He was a native of Pennsylvania, but emigrated to Tennessee while young. For a number of years he was a resident of Nashville, and died in Wayne county, Tenn., on the 11th of July 1860, in his 60th year. He was converted and united with the M.E. Church soon after he reached mature manhood, and in a short time thereafter began to preach the gospel. He exercised his gifts for thirty-four years as a local minister, and was faithful and useful in his holy calling. He was a man of good natural mind and respectable acquirements in his knowledge of the Holy Scriptures. His life was consistent. He maintained a good reputation, and exercised an influence favorable to the cause of Christianity.
¶His last sickness was protracted, but sanctified to his good. As he approached the grave, his soul repined for the joys of the “better land.” Few men ever met death with a firmer trust in the merits of Christ than did Brother Judd. Indeed his victory was complete. He talked of death with perfect calmness: and of his hope beyond the grave with full assurance. His exhortations to wife, children and friends were fraught with wisdom, and his last hours full of comfort. He died like a Christian; in full possession of his mental faculties, he bade adieu to earth,
¶“And died, his father’s God to meet”
¶Daniel Judd will long live in memory and afflictions of his friends; and will doubtless live in heaven for ever. “Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord.”
J.B. McFerrin
W. Riley Davis
Submitted by
Mary Edith Wood
Source:
Wayne County News
22 Oct 1936
W. Riley Davis, highly respected farmer of the Beech Creek community, died at his home Monday, October 19th, after a long Illness. He was 84 years of age.
¶He is survived by his last wife, Mrs. Ferbie Pulley Davis, and four children to their union, as follows; Mrs. Arizona Howell, Mrs. Viola Holt, Charlie and Bradley Davis all of the Beech Creek section, and Mrs. Ella Bawcom of Miss, daughter by his first marriage Burial was in the Bawcom Cemetery on Beech Creek.
James F. Cunningham
Submitted by
Betty Martin
Source:
Santa Ana Register–Monday, Jan., 7, 1946
    James F. Cunningham, 88, died today in his home a 332 N. Orange St., Orange. He was a native of Waynesboro, Tenn.Survivors are a son, Arthur S. Cunningham of Orange; two brothers, George and John of Oklahoma; a sister, Mrs Mary Dugger of Arkansas and other relatives.

Services will be held in the chapel of the Shannon Funeral home in Orange at 2:30 p.m. Thursday with interment in Fairhaven cemetery.

Emily West Murrie
Submitted by
Terry Ceballos
Source:
The Vienna Times, June 29, 1939  (Vienna, IL)
Aunt Emily Murrie, 94, Called Home To Rest on Sunday Evening June 25 Death Claims Aged Mother Sunday, June 25, 1939¶Emily West Murrie, daughter of Woodson and Martha (Casteel) West was born June 2, 1845, in the state of Tennessee and when a small child came with her parents to Southern Illinois.  She was one of a family of ten children, viz. Henry, James A., Osburn H., Mary, Martha, William, Amanda E., Narcissie Catherine and Fannie West. All are deceased. Mrs. Murrie departed this life at her home, southeast of Vienna, ILL., June 25, 1939, at the ripe old age of 94 years and 23 days.

¶On February 18, 1874, she was united in marriage to Jefferson Monroe Murrie and to this union seven children were born, Fleetie and Freddie having preceded her in death.  In September, 1896 the home was again bereft, this time taking the husband and father, leaving Aunt Emily with the responsibility of the home and rearing of her family, which responsibility she assumed with such Christian fortitude that her children and those who came in contact with her can rise up to call her blessed.  It can be truly said of her that her doors were open to widows and orphans and those less fortunate than she, and her advice and counsel will long  be remembered by those as the same motherly advice as given her own children.  Even the passerby received as hearty a welcome from Aunt Emily as those nearest her.

¶Her alertness, activity and keen mind kept her young despite the years which continued to roll on.

¶She professed faith in Christ as her Saviour some 65 years ago. She was not only a Christian, but one of God’s noble women, serving rather than being served, proving her faith and sincerity in the Lord by her good works; visiting the sick or those in distress, all will stand as a living monument to her memory, yet living that quiet, unpretentious, unassuming life that spoke volumes.

¶Aunt Emily never united with any church, yet she made the Cumberland Presbyterian church at Concord her spiritual home.

¶Those surviving to mourn her passing are the following sons and daughters:  Mrs.  Ida Lay, Simpson; C. W. and Harry Murrie, Vienna: Newton J. and Walter Murrie of Simpson.  Also surviving are twenty-four grandchildren, fifteen great grandchildren, a host of nieces and nephews.

“I cannot say, I will not say, that she is dead, she’s just away.”

(Her Death Certificate records that the doctor attended her from 6-18-1939 to 6-25-1939.  Cause of death:  cerebral hemorrhage which began on June 18, 1939.  Other contributory causes: arteriole sclerosis.)

Robert Walter SmithSubmitted by
Doris Smith Halford

Obituary Wayne County News

November 1980

Robert Walter Smith died November 4th, 1980 after a long illness. Robert left behind a wife, Frances. (Clifton) 3 daughters Doris Halford and Terri Warrington of Clifton and Robbie Jones of Utica, Mich.He was the son of the late Lytle and Sally Smith of Clifton.
¶My Dad passed away when he was only 57 years of age, at that time I thought he was an “old” man but now that I am his age I realize he did not get to enjoy life enough and I definately did not get to talk with my dad enough.
¶After all these years, not a day goes by that I don’t think to myself, I wish I could tell my Dad what I have done with my life and tell him all about my grandchild. I know he would smile and say, “I am so proud”
J. E. Mann
Submitted by
Jerry W. Murphy
Source:
The Clifton Mirror
Vol. 24  No. 9
Clifton, Tennessee
Friday, Dec. 9, 1904
page 1
Suicide of J.E. Mann
J. Eugene Mann, a traveling salesman out of Nashville, was found dead in his room at the Morris Hotel in Birmingham, Ala., last Saturday. His death was caused by morphine.
Mr. Mann formerly made this territory and was well-known in Clifton. He was a big, whole-souled man and his fine business and social qualities made him a general favorite. The news of his tragic death was quite a shock to his Clifton friends. No reason for the suicide has been assigned.
Albert Murphy
Submitted by
Jerry W. Murphy
Source:
“Wayne County News”
Vol. 107, No. 30
dated 10 Jan 1964
Page 1
Funeral Services Are Held Monday For Albert Murphy
Albert Murphy, 83, of Route 1 Lutts died at his home Monday January 6. Funeral services were held Tuesday from Mt. Hebron Church at 2:00 o’clock. Rev. Andrew Garrett officiated. Burial was in Houston Cemetery with Middle Tennessee Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.
Mr. Murphy was a native of Wayne County, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Seal Murphy. He was a member of the Holiness church.
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Maude Murphy; a daughter, Mrs. Alonzo Melson, and a son James Haggard Murphy both of Waynesboro.[Comment – He was the son of William “Bill” Murphy and Mary Ann Brown. He was listed as 2 years old on the 1880 census thus making him actually older than the obituary would indicate. The children by his first wife were omitted from the obituary. They were: Seab Murphy, Sr., Lewis Murphy, Janie Smith, Henry Murphy, J.T. Murphy and Haggard Murphy.]

 

Related articles


Amos Brenneman, World War I Soldier, Letter Two…

from Montgomery, Alabama.

Amos D. Brenneman served in Company C, 167th U.S. Infantry, served overseas and was severely injured in combat at Croix Rouge Farm in France on July 26, 1918. The last letter in the library collection written by Amos is dated 17 January 1919. Amos Brenneman remained in the military after the war, eventually achieving the rank of Master Sergeant.

Amos Brenneman served in the 42nd “Rainbow” Division, one of the first U.S. divisions to engage in fighting in Europe. The division participated in six major battle campaigns and served in occupation duty in Germany after the armistice was signed.

Amos Brenneman had a brother who also served in World War I. William Roy Brenneman probably spent the entire war at Fort Dade, Florida. He served in the Coastal Artillery Corps, Company 1. The last letter in the collection written by Roy Brenneman is dated 2 September 1918. Roy Brenneman was born 12 December 1894, and he died 8 October 1961, in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is buried in the Crawfordsville Masonic Cemetery.
R3 August 1917 letter home from Amos Brenneman, page 1

3 August 1917 letter home from Amos Brenneman, page 1

3 August 1917 letter home from Amos Brenneman, page 2

3 August 1917 letter home from Amos Brenneman, page 3


Postcards from the edge…

well, not really postcards, but letters from the past. And the Shoals area has a past very saturated with historic people, happenings, places, and events. Take, for instance, one Amos Brenneman.

photo of Amos Brenneman from Sheffield, Alabama, World War I soldier

Amos Brenneman was born 13 July 1898 and died 9 February 1956. He and other family members are buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Sheffield, Alabama. Amos Brenneman was a soldier of World War I. He served in Company C, 167th U.S. Infantry, served overseas, and was injured in combat at Croix Rouge Farm in France on July 26, 1918.
photo of Amos Brenneman World War I Soldier
The dates of his nine letters extend from 22 July 1917 to 17 January 1919. Amos Brenneman remained in the military after the war, eventually achieving the rank of Master Sergeant. His brother Roy also served. The letters will be shared here:
22 July 1917 Letter 1
22 July 1917 Letter 1 page 2
22 July 1917 Letter 1 page 3
Each letter will be published as a separate article so that size can be maintained.
All Rights Reserved by Remembering the Shoals 2012

I wonder aloud as to how much history has been forgotten…

about my hometown area – the Shoals area. In 1976 the American Chemist Society erected the historical marker at 300 W. 20th Street at the edge of the Furnace Hill area, as a tribute to Furnace Hill and the chemists of the five blast furnaces that operated there in the center of the industrial Park of Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama.

The span of the years from 1887 to 1895  five blast furnaces were built on the west side of the new town – Sheffield. That was the birth of my hometown when they organized for the express purpose of exploiting the iron and coal so richly abundant in the area.

Tracts of land on the Tennessee River that contained twenty-acre lots were used as inducements to encourage development of furnaces for the production of pig iron. These inducements were provided by Sheffield Land, Iron  and Coal Company after its formation in 1883. Sheffield Furnace Company grabbed up the first tract when they agreed to build one blast furnace. Three tracts were awarded to Tennessee Coal & Iron Company in exchange for three blast furnaces.

Sheffield Furnace Company built the first blast furnace in Sheffield. It went operational New Year’s Eve 1887. A short three months later, Enoch Ensley (from Nashville) purchased the furnace. He was a very enterprising man and went on to acquire vast acreage in Franklin County rich in brown hematite used as ore. He also acquired the Horse Creek Coal Mine in Walker County, Alabama where a couple hundred beehive ovens were constructed to make coke for the Sheffield furnace. Prior to that enterprise the needed coke was shipped in from Virginia.

Ensley’s company formed the Lady Ensley Coal, Iron & Railway Company and received the deed for his company. It later became the Hattie Ensley Furnace. Enoch Ensley named the furnace in honor of his daughter. The Hattie Ensley furnace did not cease production of pig iron until 1926.

In 1888 another twenty-acre tract was awarded Ensley when he built another furnace. That furnace to honor his wife was named Lady Ensley. This furnace was blown in on 25 April 1885.photo of Sheffield Ammunition Plant

Three more furnaces were to be built by the Sheffield & Birmingham Coal, Iron & Railway Company, which was formerly Tennessee & Alabama Coal & Iron Company. Completes were in 1888, 1889 and 1895. By the time of completion in 1895, the property was transferred to Alabama Iron & Railway Company, then transferred to W. W. Coke & Associates. The Cole Company then formed Sheffield Coal, Iron & Steel Company.In 1883 all the land now embraced by the city of Sheffield was acquired by the Sheffield Land, Iron & Coal Company, and in May of 1884 lots were put on sale and my hometown of Sheffield was founded.

The production of pig iron ranged from 170 tons to an average of 221 tons per day. the Hattie Ensley Furnace set a record in May of 1904 by producing  6,851 tons. That is a lot of pig iron.

The area schools taught chemistry since 1825, but there were no Industrial Chemist employed in the area to that date that the furnaces were opened. Of note are the chemists this industry brought into the Shoals area.

Chemists who worked at the Furnace operations were: John Foster, James C. Foster, S. P. Cowardin, Marvin Garrison, Cletus McWilliams, and Frances E. Holloway. And a whole village was born that housed workers for these furnaces and future government jobs through the Tennessee Valley Authority.

The Fosters were natives of Pennsylvania. Their ancestor Thomas Foster was a soldier in the Revolutionary War (DAR 5152) and ancestor William Foster served in the War of 1812. James C. Foster, who married Dee McDavid of Florence, died in 1900. He had accidentally consumed water poisoned with corrosive sublimate.

It would be of great interest to those who attended Sheffield schools, that the children of John Foster and Martha Elsie Stebbens Foster were: William Anson Foster, Josephine Marie Foster,  Mary Dee Foster, Anna Foster, and Martha J. Foster . Daughter, Josephine Foster,  was the wife of William August Threadgill. Mr. And Mrs. Threadgill were long time teachers and principal in Sheffield Schools. When I started first grade they were at Alabama Avenue School where the Board of Education is now housed.  A school bears his name in tribute – the W. A. Threadgill Elementary School, now Primary School. The school is at 900 Annapolis Avenue in Sheffield.

John Foster worked in the Sheffield Furnace until 1912. He then removed to Tennessee. Later, in 1933 he went to work at the Tennessee Valley Authority as a chemist.

By the beginning of World War I only one of the Cole Furnaces was operable. It did not produce until early 1918 because of legalities. The Lady Ensley Furnace was torn down in 1916, but had ceased operations in 1910. A new furnace was built to replace the Lady Ensley. The new furnace began operation in 1915 or 1916 and continued operation until August 1927. With Lady Ensley’s replacement being blown out in 1927 there came an end to iron production in Sheffield – forty years of production.

Sloss-Sheffield Iron & Steel Company acquired the Ensley furances after 1891 and Enoch Ensley’s death. They went on to acquire the Cole furnaces, and another furnaces property in Florence. Eventually U. S. Pipe & Foundry acquired the properties; then ownership went to Jim Walter Corporation and it was renamed the Coal, Iron & Chemicals Group of Jim Walter Corporation. After several years of leasing the property, the property came under the ownership of U. S. Steel Corporation.

Before closing the dialog on the blast furnaces of the Shoals area, there needs to be a mention of one important invention that Sheffield and the workers at the blast furnaces influenced. A Vanderbilt graduate, D. I. Miller a graduate Mechanical Engineer, invented the furnace top. He worked as Acting Superintendent at several blast furnaces including those in our area, procurement agent, foreman, and then inventor extraordinaire. The blast furnace top was designed for charging and properly distributing the material in a blast furnace. This new blast furnace top was intended for furnaces with an output of less than 300 tons per day – a perfect fit for the blast furnaces in our area. He acknowledged that he invented the new furnace top with suggestions from his co-laborers at the Sloss-Sheffield Company blast furnace. The invention was of epic proportions and his new invention was manufactured by likely the largest manufacturing concern of the time, the Hunt Company.

There were furnaces in Lauderdale County as well. The Florence Land, Mining and Manufacturing Company was incorporated with a capital of $800,000 by a group of Florence Citizens on 31 August 1886. The company purchased thousands of acres in and near the city of Florence and set about the task of bringing industries to North Alabama. The Florence Land Company, a division of the aforementioned company, donated a tract of 128 acres in the city of Florence on the Tennessee River to the W. B. Wood Furnace Company, and there was the Philadelphia Furnace in Florence. In northern Alabama there were also furnaces in Decatur and Fort Payne.

William Basil Wood was the leader of our beloved 16th Regiment of Alabama Infantry who fought so valiantly during the War Between the States. It is on record that because his men were so tattered and torn in their clothing, many without shoes because they had worn them out and many had rags tied on their feet in those bitter winters of the war, that he started his own manufacturing company making uniforms for them; and possibly bullets.

By the time of World War I, the manufacturing of pig iron was pretty much a thing of the past. The people were desperate for industry and jobs. President-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt addressed an immense crowd in the Shoals area  from his railroad car in January 1933, and promised “to put Muscle Shoals back on the map.” He then toured the idle U.S. Nitrate Plant No. 2 and Wilson Dam with Senator George Norris. The new Congress approved Norris’s plans for development of the entire Tennessee River and FDR signed the Tennessee Valley Authority Act 15 May 1933, thereby ending years of bitter controversy about the future of the Muscle Shoals district. The nitrate plants were given to TVA for development of fertilizer in peacetime and production of munitions in wartime.

FDR returned to Sheffield in 1934, to inspect the work underway by TVA at Wheeler Dam and Nitrate Plant No. 2 and again boarded his train in Sheffield. The TVA projects helped the area recover from the Great Depression, and power from the dams induced new industries to locate here.

Wilson Dam was once used as a power supply center for munitions plants in World War l. For production of ammunition for use during WWI, the Sheffield Nitrogen Plant, built in 1917 was to be converted to a 90 and 105 MM Plant, as soon as possible.

Photo of Sheffield Munitions Plant being built

The J A Jones Construction Company was contracted for the construction of the building. Construction went on rapidly, until the main plant was to be put in and then it was decided to cancel the entire plant because the shells were no longer needed in the war effort.

Alabama Blast Furnaces written by Joseph H. Woodward is the first and remains the première source of information on all blast furnaces built and operated in Alabama, from the first known charcoal furnace of 1815 (Cedar Creek Furnace in Franklin County) to the coke-fired giants built before the onset of the Great Depression. From the rise of the iron industry in support of the Confederate war effort, to the giant internationally important industry that developed in the 1890s, the manufacture of pig iron in Alabama was the most important industry of the State and was a vital factor in the prosperity and welfare of its people.

Alabama has been the site for seventy-seven blast furnaces. Four more furnaces were either partially completed or, if completed, were never operated. Out of this total of 81 furnaces 32 were built to use charcoal as fuel and of this number 10 used coke at some time during their operation. Five of these eleven furnaces were later permanently converted for coke fuel. So, it would seem Enoch Ensley and his imperialistic nature benefited the Shoals area citizens; and that Sheffield was ahead of its time in the respect to the production of pig iron using coke.

Resources:

Alabama Blast Furnaces written by Joseph H. Woodward. Reprinted by University Of Alabama Press, 25 October 2006.

A Record of University Life and Work,” The Vanderbilt University Quarterly, Volume 7, Number 1, page 223. Published by the University of Vanderbilt on January 1907.

“Sheffield Historical Context ” written by John A Ford. Published by Sheffield History and Recollections, a Journal of Muscle Shoals History, Tennessee Valley Historical Association, Volume XVIII, pages 5-6. Published 2011. Photo of Richard Sheridan of Hattie Ensley Furnace.

“Chemists will Pay Furnace Hill Workers Tribute” by Staff. Published by Florence Times Daily Newspaper, 28 March 1976, page 4 and 22.

http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=ZRksAAAAIBAJ&sjid=4cgEAAAAIBAJ&pg=1227%2C4312159


You are not poor because someone else is wealthy…

is an excellent summation of a lady and her life that I hold dear in my memory; and it is as àpropos during my childhood as it is now.  Back in the day, there did not seem to be much coveting of someone else’s success or wealth; nor was there jealousy. It seemed that those who had been successful illuminated the way for others to follow to attain the American Dream. And if the American Dream is dead, it was not the people who slaughtered it.

The lady I write about is Lena Mae Myhan. She was an extraordinarily ordinary woman. That was part of what made her extraordinary in the crossed eyes of my childhood. You would have thought that I would have been spoiled as the only

Obituary for William M Myhan

My grandfather and great uncle served as honorary pall bearers for this long time family friend and neighbor.

girl, but uh uh. And I am thankful for that as I learned independence at an early age. Miss Lena Mae was one of the few who exclaimed to me as a little girl that I had beautiful blue eyes; notwithstanding that the right one was firmly placed in the corner of my eye socket next to my nose. And she remembered every birthday of every child in the near neighborhood for as long as I could remember; that was really special because for the most part our family really did not  pay much attention to birthdays back then. I loved Miss Lena Mae; and came to think of her in my adult life as a bonus grandmother.

What about this ordinary woman made her so extraordinary in the eyes of a little Sheffield girl? Let me count the ways. For one thing, she taught me a lot of things that are virtues in today’s world – and all without even knowing it. A little background is in order here.

The Myhan family has known and have been neighbors of my Murray family for more than 150 years now. Most of them are gone now. Our families go way, way back.

Miss Lena Mae Myhan’s family history is one of great pride. Her earliest known ancestor, John Myhand and wife Mary MacMiel immigrated from Lietrim, Ireland. John Myhand and Mary McMiel Myhand were devisees in John MacMiel’s 1729 will and upon his death his son-in-law John Myhand received several hundred acres of property while daughter Mary MacMiel Myhand inherited his plantation.

Their son James Myhand also immigrated from Lietrim, Ireland; he lived in Rowan County, North Carolina and he and his wife Sarah Bryant Myhand are buried in Sampson County, North Carolina. Their known children were Jesse Myhand, Silas Myhand and James Myhand.

Their son, James Myhand was born in Morgan, Rowan County, North Carolina in 1755. He married Rosannah Owen in 1782 in North Carolina. James and Rosannah Owen Myhand migrated to Georgia and lived in Morgan County. There someone on his behalf was a fortunate drawer in the 1820 Georgia Land Lottery that rewarded his service in the Revolutionary War with the gift of land. In 1820 James Myhand’s fortunate draw was in Irwin County, Georgia which was claimed on 3 November 1823, likely by his widow Rosannah Owen Myhand since he had died in 1819. You will find the Myhand family well represented in the Daughters of the America Revolution files. Rosannah Myhand left a “Deed-of-Gift” when she died and it is recorded in Harris County, Georgia Deed Book “A” (1828-1832) page 623.

Here is the text of the gift; Georgia Date of “Deed-of-Gift Morgan County August 12, 1831 Between: Rosannah Myhand,of Morgan County, Georgia, Give unto: My two sons: Alvin and James Myhand, Jr. of Morgan County, Georgia Land Lot – 108, 5th District, Troup County, Georgia, containing: 202 1/2 acres, granted to myself widow of Revolutionary Soldier on April 23 1828. Her signature was an ‘x’ mark; witenss was Caswell J Allen, John J McNeel, J. P.

The Myhand family males provided military service to protect and defend this nation in most of the wars in which America was engaged. James and Rossannah Myhand had a number of children likely: John, William, Nancy, Sarah “Sallie”, Thomas, Alvin, Jesse, Abner L, and James Knight Myhand.

James and Rossannah Owen Myhand’s son James Myhan was born in North Carolina or Cass County, Georgia; he married Bersheba McCowan in North Carolina. He migrated to first to Warren County and then to Morgan County, Georgia. He and his wife are buried there. Their known children are Mary Myhand, Thomas Butler Myhand, and John Myhand. It is their son John Myhand that continues the lineage for our Miss Lena Mae Myhan.

John H Myhand was born circa 1815 in Cass County, Georgia which then was considered the [New] Country. He married Eliza A Horne. In 1850 they were living in Cass County, Georgia [Country]. By 1860 they were living in Franklin County, Alabama. Their children were: William, Mary, John H, Susannah, Missouri A, Edward J, Zachary (or Zachariah) Taylor, Sarah, and Benjamin Franklin Myhand. John reportedly died in 1880 and may be the John Myhand buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Cypress Inn, Wayne County, Tennessee.

John H and Eliza A Horne Myhand’s son, William T Myhan was Miss Lena Mae Myhand paternal grandfather. He was born in 7 March 1833 in Georgia and died  11 Dec 1905 in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama. He is buried at Morning Star Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama. William T Myhand married Susan MATILDA McCorkle, daughter of Thomas Jefferson and Susan M McCorkle. They had the following children: Alice P Myhan Finney 1867 – 1933 Ella Minerva Myhan Clark Rumph 1867 – 1952, Laura P Myhan  1870 – 1953, Betty Elizabeth Myhan Kimbrough 1875 – 1968, Jo Ann or Joan Myhan Elledge 1879 – 1962, William M Myhan 1880 – 1959,  Martin Myhan 1881 –   , Thomas E Myhan 1877 – 1944 and Charles Everett Myhan 1884 – 1965. A large number of the Myhan and related families are buried at Morning Star Cemetery where three or four generations of my Murray and related families are buried.

William Myhand served in the Confederacy during the War Between the States. He served as a Private in Company K of the 5th Arkansas Regiment entering in April of 1861 and afterwards served in the 11th Alabama Regiment of Cavalry from 7 April 1861; entering this regiment at Prides [Landing]. He was captured and taken prisoner of war being held a prisoner in Nashville, Tennessee. He continued to serve until being honorably discharged in 1865 in Montgomery. His widow, Susan M Myhan,  made an application for a pension on 26 Jun 1903. The application was granted and the pension was for the total of $2.50 per month.

Their son William M Myhan was Miss Lena Mae Myhan’s father. Her mother was Minnie Lee Ida, but her maiden name is yet to be discovered. Ida Myhand died in 1918 and is buried in Morning Star Cemetery. They had two girls: Lena Mae Myhan and IvaDell Myhan.

IvaDell Myhan was born 29 Nov 1908 in Colbert County, Alabama and died 1 November 1985 in Sheffield. She and her husband, Willie J Young are buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Sheffield. They had two girls named Lola M and Betty A Young. Ivadell and her family lived in Chattanooga at one time, and on another census record it was inferred their residence was in LaGrange, Georgia. The Young family returned to their native Alabama and lived in Sheffield when she died.

Miss Lena Mae, that is what we all called her, was born 19 January 1906 in Colbert County. Her family had lived in the neighborhood of my paternal family for nigh over one hundred and fifty years at the time of her death; they had lived in the neighborhood of my maternal family for nearly fifty years. So, the history is steep and deep between our families.

Miss Lena Mae was not a pretty woman; at least to the time I remember her. But I had always pictured her as a young girl to be as pretty as she was in my mind’s eye as a child. Of course, she seemed a woman of ancient maturity by the time my memory set in; but even until her death I saw no change in her appearance from how I remember her. There is a photo of one of her ancestors that looks how I imagine her to have looked at the same age; beautiful and young and vibrant. She was not a silly, flighty girl, who lived on airs and pretentiousness. She was pragmatic, and she loved her father.  She was taller than my mother and a little on the stout side. She wore little cotton house-dresses and always seemed to have an apron tied around her waist. She and Mr. Lon always grew the most luscious looking and green garden behind their home. She had a huge dip in her forehead where a metal plate resided; and her hearing was all but nonexistent.  Her hair was mostly a light gray and she kept it in a ball at the nap of her neck; obviously she had black hair in her youth. There always seemed to be a little wisp of hair blowing in the breeze from her temples. She must have had back problems since her gait was a little on the awkward side; if I recall correctly she had a steel rod in her back. But in all my lifetime, I never heard her complain. Her life was dedicated to the care and welfare of her father; she was a worker. Lest you get the idea that she was just a girl from Appalachia without many virtues; the record will be clear now. She had a four-year college degree but evidently never used it; her father consumed all her time. She had lost her mother when she was just twelve; and for some reason when her father became crippled she assumed the role of caregiver 24/7. Her father, William M Myhan, had been a rural route Mail Carrier for the U S Government during his working days.  He drove a horse drawn wagon to deliver the mail to my family and others in rural Colbert County for decades. After moving to Sheffield he worked at King Stove and Foundry and retired from that employment. He was a member of the Okolona Baptist Church that still exists on the corner of Sixth Street and Wilson Dam Road in Muscle Shoals, as has many of my relatives and ancestors.

It was said that he had an ingrown toenail which had became gangrenous and had to have one of his legs amputated. He was pretty much bedridden by the time I was a child. I remember his armless wheelchair which seemed to take up most of the room where his bed was located. And I remember his shockingly white hair. I always thought he looked pretty healthy, except for the missing leg. The family had a boarder, Alonzo “Lon” Marlar, who lived in with them for many years and helped her take care of her father; but also had a day job and worked at Martin Stove which was a foundry across the railroad tracks. The family had no phone, no car, no television and Miss Lena Mae never had children. Their seating under the shade trees outside were those wooden straightback chairs with the woven seat. They did have the most beautiful dog that I have ever seen. He was a collie and all fluffy and energetic; his name was Carlo and he would be in the street where we would travel and play a lot of the time. Many would consider them poor, very poor. But you are not poor because someone else is wealthy.

Miss Lena Mae was one of the influences that taught me pride, independence, and that you do not have to have a lot of money, riches, property, beautiful clothes, or worldly possessions to be rich – and neither does any person worth his/her salt covet or envy those who are more fortunate than they for that is a biblical sin. Actually, that is the backbone of my families on both sides. Growing up in the little city of Sheffield made myself and my siblings what we are today; we had so many good influences to model after.

I remember as a child, standing with my jaw dropped when Miss Lena Mae’s sister and her family would visit. The juxtaposition of the lifestyle of the sister and my beloved Miss Lena Mae was stark, even to a child. They came in a car, what seemed like a nice car. They had nice clothes, unlike the little cotton house-dresses that Miss Lena Mae wore. The sister had a husband and two beautiful children. I imagined they lived in a Norman Rockwell house and had a Norman Rockwell life. Whereas, Miss Lena Mae and her family had rented that lonely looking house at 1001 West 13th in southwest Sheffield for what could have been a lifetime, by my estimation more than forty years. I think the rent was less than $75 per month likely much less for them. but they had rented it long enough to have bought it a dozen times or more. Those houses were removed from TVA property when one of the Villages was done away with. They were originally shotgun houses with a dog trot through the middle. They look nicer now, but as a child they were unpainted and a bleak gray. They heated the house with coal. I remember getting Miss Lena Mae some pretty towels one Mother’s Day. When I took them to her and went to hang them up in her bathroom, I was unable to hang them because the bathroom was bare and did not even have a towel rack or a toilet paper holder.

My heart ached for my Miss Lena Mae because I thought she deserved just as good as her sister and I did not understand the difference in the two lives. It seemed to me that the sister lived a charmed life and did not visit that often, perhaps they lived out of town. And Miss Lena Mae was dedicated to the welfare and care of her invalid father all her adult life; it just was such a stark contrast in the mind of a child, but Miss Lena Mae never took a breath that showed resentment or jealousy or envy. It was as it was supposed to be. She was rich.

I had become aware of the Vocational Rehabilitation Center in Muscle Shoals. When I asked them about a hearing aid for someone like her; they suggested that she come in and were sure that they could help her. I was ecstatic at the thought of her getting help with her hearing and I eagerly told her about their service. It was then I learned a good life lesson about independence and pride. She told me that she would not be getting the hearing aids. She stated that was ‘charity’ and that charity was for those who were poor. There was a jolt to my system because I had (mistakenly) thought she was poor just because she did not have many worldly possessions. Well, she taught me and I have remembered that lesson for a lifetime now. That is how our past generations of family were; proud and independent. Those attributes are likely why those in the deep south are so mistrusting of the government. When I think back on that incident, I get chills; oh, how I loved that wonderful extraordinarily ordinary woman.

Mr Lon was born in Missouri and was living in the household of his sister Grace Thomas in Sheffield on the 1930 census record. He was age 31 and single. Grace and her husband William E Thomas were the parents of Paul Thomas. We called him Mr Paul and his wife Miss Audie. They lived next door to my maternal grandparents on West 8th Street in southwest Sheffield as long as I could remember and until their deaths.

After her father died in 1959; she was such an upright person that she told Mr. Lon that it wouldn’t be right or look right for them to continue to live in the same house without being married. So that is what they did. Her father died in January of 1959 and in February of 1959 they married. They lived in that shotgun house on West 13th in Sheffield until he died, and then she lived there until she was put in a nursing home and then died. She and Lon Marlar are buried at Colbert County Memorial Gardens.

What good memories I have of my Sheffield childhood; and Miss Lena Mae Myhan Marlar is one of them. She taught me that WE ARE ALL RICH.


Huggins…

no it is not an event like a sit-in. Huggins was a name that appeared in Lauderdale County, Alabama around the 1840 era. There are still descendants of the Phillip Huggins line and the Mathew English (born 1772)  line in the Shoals area. A family reunion was held at McFarland Park in Florence for the English and Huggins descendants some years. The Huggins family was a prolific family that dated back to colonial days.

The progenitor of this Huggins line was John Huggins who was born in Belfast, Antrim, Ireland and died in Rowan County, North Carolina. Son, Luke Huggins, who was born 28 Nov 1723 in Belfast, Antrim, Ireland. He died 6 Jul 1806 in Lincoln County, North Carolina. It is not known where he is buried, but the surname is found in two cemeteries in Lincoln County, North Carolina: Hollybrook Cemetery in Lincolnton and Mount Zion Baptist Church Cemetery in Alexis.

The Huggins were some of the colonial first families of our budding nation. In Colonial Families of the United States of America: Volume 6 ISSUE BY FIRST MARRIAGE  the following passage is given: William Hancock, of Onslow County, North Carolina; b. 15th October, 1773; d. 27th September, 1849; m. (firstly) Dorothy (surname not given); m. (secondly) the widow Dudley; m. (thirdly) Ruth Huggins, sister of Luke Huggins.

Ruth and Luke’s parents were John Huggins 1690-1752 and Mary Carruth 1697-1796. John Huggins’ parents were James Huggins 1653 – 1728 born in Dumbarton, Dunbartonshire, Scotland and died in Anterim, Scotland; and Janet McClelland who was born and died in Scotland. It is noted that John Huggins’ parents were Crandall O Hagan born in 1620 and Shirlie ODonally. No research has been conducted on these names.

John and Mary Carruth Huggins had a large family of children: James Huggins 1715 – 1789, Helen Huggins born 1716, Robert Huggins born 1718, James Huggins 1719 – 1742, Jane Huggins 1721 – 1798, Mary Huggins 1722 – 1787, Luke Huggins 1723 – 1806, John Huggins 1725 – 1811, Ann Huggins 1727 – 1789, William Huggins 1729 – 1801, James Huggins 1730 – 1793, and Mary Polly Huggins 1770 – 1832.

The Huggins surname appears regularly among those who fought for Independence in the American Revolution. Among the names were Daniel Huggins, James Huggins, Luke Huggins, Michael Huggins and Nehemiah Huggins. Luke Huggins, James Huggins, and Michael Huggins all entered service on 25 April 1781 in Dixon’s Company. They served for twelve months and left service on 25 April 1782. Nehemiah Huggins served in Sharp’s Company and enlisted for three years. James Huggins may have reached the rank of Captain.

Luke and wife Nelly had a large family of children: Charles Huggins, Esther Huggins, Hannah Huggins, Isaac Huggins, Jacob Huggins, James Huggins, Luke Huggins, Nelly Huggins Littlejohn, Phoebe Huggins Shelfer, Sarah Huggins Standley, Temperance Huggins, Thomas Huggins,  and Phillip Jasper Huggins 1765 – 1840.

The following is the Will for Luke Huggins:

Will of Luke Huggins                                                                      Jones County, N. Carolina

In the name of God amen, the eighth day of March 1784

I Luke Huggins of Jones Conty in the state of North Carolina, being in health
of body and of perfiect mind and memory thanks be given to God. therefore,
calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowning that it is appointed
for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament
in manner and form as follows.

Imprimis I lend to my beloved wife Nelly Huggins all my lands with the
plantation I now live on also all the rest of my estate of all kins
whatsoever during her natural life or widowhood.

Imprimis I give unto my daughter Phebe Shelfer on shilling sterling money.

Imprimis I give unto my daughter Sarah Standley one shilling sterling money.

Imprimis I give unto my daughter Nelly Littleton one shilling sterling money.

Imprimis I give unto my son James Huggins on shilling sterling money to him
& his heirs forever.

Imprimis I give unto my son Luke Huggins on shilling sterling money to him
his heirs forever.

Imprimis I give unto my son Isaac Huggins on shilling sterling money to him
& his heirs forever

Imprimis I give unto my son Jacob Huggins the plantation I now live on with
all the rest of my lands to him & his heirs forever.

Imprimis I give all the rest of my estate of all kind whatsoever to my
youngest children Esther Huggins, Hanna Huggins, Thomas Huggins, Charles
Huggins, and Temperance Huggins to be equally divided among them at my death
or the death of my wife Nelly Huggins, likewise I constitute and ordain Simon
Speight and John Perry executors of this my last will and testament.
I hereby utterly revoke and disannull all other wills or testaments ratifying
and confirming this and no other as my last will and testamen; in witness
whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year above written.

Luke Huggins (seal)
written
signed sealed published and declared as his
last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers
Nathan X Bryan
Waxel Perry
Adonijah Perry
Probated Jones County, N. Carolina
Dec. Term 1784
Nathan Bryan, Adonija Parry, Simon
Speight were there
Test. Lew. Bryan C. C.
Jones County Will Book A pg 40-42
March 08, 1784 – Dec 1784

There was no mention of Phillip Huggins in the will; and that can not be explained with the information known today. As with all family research, you present the best information that is available at the time of research. There are bound to be some unknowns, unexplainables, errors, and omissions; it is just the nature of the human. However, the information presented is a very sound foundation for more research.

Phillip Jasper Huggins was born ca 1765 in Burke County, North Carolina and died in 1840 in Van Buren, Arkansas. Jane Morris was born 1771 in Burke County, North Carolina and married 8 December 1791 to Phillip Huggins. Their children were:

John Huggins born 9-22-1792 in Buncombe County, North Carolina USA 
Died 16 April 1849 in Franklin County, Arkansas                                                                                                                                                Married 10-14-1819 in Lauderdale County Alabama to Sarah D Farris

Mary Huggins born 1794 in North Carolina
Died 1855 in Van Buren, Arkansas
Married (in Tennessee?) before 1820 to Henry Goodnight, Jr

Luke Huggins Sr born 3-1-1795 in Buncombe, North Carolina 
Died 1 Feb 1879 in Ozark, Franklin County, Arkansas
Married 14 March 1818 in Tennessee to Nancy Melton

Susannah Charlotte Huggins born 1796 in North Carolina
Died 19 Nov 1883 in Hopkins County, Texas
Married 2 Feb 1818 in Giles County, Tennessee to William Garret

Tabitha Huggins born 1797 in Burke/Buncombe County, North Carolina
Died July 1886 in Mcnairy County, Tennessee 
Married 1818 in Lauderdale County, Alabama to Thomas Pinkney Hamm

Rachel Huggins born 13 Sep 1798 in North Carolina
Died 10 Jan 1874 in AR
Married William Hamm

Jenny Huggins bron in 1799 in North Carolina, death not known 
Married 14 Jan 1823 in Lauderdale County, Alabama to John H Garrett

Elizabeth Huggins born 18 Feb 1800 in North Carolina, death not known
Married 19 October 1820 in Lauderdale County, Alabama  to John English

James Madison Huggins born 27 May 1801 in Buncombe County, North Carolina
Died 2 Sep 1892 in Mcnairy County, Tennessee 
Married 12 Jan 1823 in Lauderdale County, Alabama  to Elizabeth Robertson

Thomas J Huggins born 1797 in North Carolina, death not known
Married Elizabeth Huggins
Married Nancy English

Phillip Jasper Huggins born 25 Jul 1809 in Lauderdale County, Alabama                                            Died between 1850-1860 in McNairy County, Tennessee 
Married Agnes Robertson
Married 25 Feb 1823 in Lauderdale County, Alabama to Elizabeth English

Sarah Morris “Sally” Huggins born 18 March 1811 in Kentucky
Died 4 March 1844 in Tennessee
Married 14 Jun 1825 in Florence, Lauderdale County, Alabama  to William Alfred Stone

Anney Huggins born 26 May 1817 in McNairy County, Tennessee
Died 11 July 1896 in McNairy County, Tennessee
Married 23 Dec 1824 in Lauderdale County, Alabama to Richard Rushing

Tabitha Huggins and her  husband Thomas Pinckney Hamm’s son was John M. Hamm who was the subject of a writing in Goodspeed’s. The text of the article follows:

HAMM, John M., one of the pioneers of the Fourth District, and son of Thomas P. and Tabitha (Huggins) Hamm, was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in 1822, being the third of thirteen children, two only living. The father, Thomas P., was of Scotch-Dutch ancestry, born in Kentucky in 1778. The grandfather, John HAMM, was a native of South Carolina, born about 1759 and when fourteen or fifteen years of age volunteered his services in the Revolutionary war, served under Gen. MARION; was married in his native State and afterward went to Logan County, Ky., from there to Middle Tennessee, then to Lauderdale County, Ala., finally settling in McNairy County in 1826, where he engaged in farming until his death, October, 1836. He was a magistrate for a number of years. Thomas P. received a common-school education, while residing in Kentucky; married in 1818, and came to McNairy County in 1827, where, with the exception of a few years spent in Hardin County, he remained until his death in 1856. He was a farmer. The mother was born in North Carolina in 1778, and died July, 1886. Our subject, John M., was brought up on his father’s place; received such education as the common schools afforded; came to McNairy County with his family, and was married December, 1843, to Elizabeth, daughter of Robert C. and Rebecca HOUSTON. She was born in 1827. Their union was blessed with twelve children, of whom are Archibald B., James R., Rebecca, wife of Wilson A. SMITH, of Arkansas; Cynthia Ann, wife of Thomas RAMER; Tabitha, wife of James PRATHER; Mary E., wife of Dr. J. L. LAWSON; Fannie, wife of Jones REEDER; Sallie, wife of Thomas BAKER; John H., William and Mac. Mr. HAMM has lived in the vicinity and on his farm since 1865. He at one time owned 800 acres of land, but has divided a portion of it among his children; still has 400 of valuable acres under high cultivation, well improved, three miles east of Ramer. He is a man of great industry, and well informed, possessed of fine business capacity. He takes a deep interest in the advancement of education, has always a helping hand for charitable and religious institutions. At about the time of his majority was elected magistrate, held the office for twenty-five years, was tax collector about twenty-seven years, and in 1880 was census taker. He is a Democrat and has always been. The first presidential vote he cast was for James K. POLK, in 1844. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity thirty-five years, taking the Royal Arch degree. Both he and his wife are devoted members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
Source: Goodspeed Biographies McNairy County Tennessee.

The Bible for Phillip Jasper Huggins and Ella English Huggins provides much information on the family members.

P. J. & ELLA HUGGINS FAMILY BIBLE

MARRIAGES:

  • James M. Huggins and Elizabeth Robertson was married Jan 14, 1823
  • Philip Huggins and Jane Morris was married Dec the 8th, 1791
  • Joseph Robertson and Margaret Simpson was married July 26th, 1804
  • P. J. Huggins and Ella English were married Oct 11, 1885 Witness J. N. Hamm and J. W. McCoy

BIRTHS:

  • James M. Huggins was born May the 27th AD 1801
  • Elizabeth Robertson was born June 20th AD 1807
  • Leroy M. Huggins was born Nov 27th 1823
  • Lucinda was born Aug 1st 1825
  • Joseph R. Huggins was born May 12th 1827
  • Roda Huggins was born May 7th 1830
  • J. S. Huggins was born Dec 31st 1832
  • James L. Huggins was born Aug 9th 1834
  • Levi H. Huggins was born Feb 2nd 1838
  • Philip Huggins was born Nov 14th 1839
  • Huggins was born May 20th 1841
  • Elizabeth Huggins was born Oct 16th 1845
  • Sarah J. Huggins was born oct 26th 1848
  • Martha A. Huggins was born July 7, 1850
  • P. J. Huggins bornd Feb 14, 1864
  • Ella English bornd Nov 5, 1868
  • Edna N. Huggins bornd Aug 10, 1887
  • Lee Audry Huggins bornd May 24, 1893
  • Harlie Abbey Huggins borned May 31, 1895
  • Arthur Huggins bornd Nov 5, 1897
  • Edgar Judson Huggins bornd Sept 21, 1901
  • Joe R Huggins was born Mar 13, 1860

DEATHS:

  • Lucinda Huggins departed this life August 15th 1825
  • Rhoda Huggins departed this life Sept 29th 1831
  • Levi H Huggins departed this life Feb 19th 1840
  • Margaret Huggins departed this life Aug 5th 1841
  • Martha A Huggins departed this life Sept the 7th 1850
  • Joseph R. Huggins departed this life Aug 30th 1853
  • Elizabeth Huggins the wife of James M Huggins, Sen Died May 1st 1882
  • James M. Huggins died Sept 3rd, 1892
  • J. S. Huggins departed this life Oct 27th, 1900
  • Joc R. Huggins died Nov 26th 1927
  • Thomas B. Huggins died Apr 9, 1928
  • Lee M. Huggins died Nov 31, 1936
  • Belle Latta Huggins died Nov 3, 1936
  • Izora Huggins wife of Lee Huggins died Sep 1, 1931
  • Martha Hamm wife of J. N. Hamm died Feb 2, 1940
  • Robert C. Huggins died July 11, 1953
  • James L. Hugginsdeparted this life Feb 27, 1952Courtesy of: Sybil Hamm Taylor and Nancy Wardlow Kennedy

James Montgomery Huggins, the eldest son of Phillip Jasper and Jane Morris Huggins was born 27 May 1801 in Buncombe County, North Carolina and died 3 Sep 1892 in Gravel Hill, McNairy County, Tennessee. The Huggins families  lived in Gravel Hill, Michie and Guys communities. James Huggins married 18 Feb 1823 to Elizabeth Robertson or Robison in Lauderdale County, Alabama. Their children were: John Morris Huggins, Leroy M. Huggins of Corinth, Mississippi; Joseph Huggins, John Simpson Huggins of McNairy County, Tennessee;  John L. Huggins of Corinth, Mississippi: Phillip Huggins, and Elizabeth Cates of Kossuth, Mississippi, wife of R.C. Cates, son of Pleasant Cates formerly of the county seat of Purdy.

John Morris Huggins was born December 1832 in Lauderdale County, Alabama and died 23 Sep 1890 in Mulberry, Franklin County, Arkansas. The Huggins family went to Arkansas before the 1840s and They seem to have ties to other families: Goodnight family in Van Buren; Reeves, Null, English, Weaver families who came from Giles County and McNairy County in Tennessee or Lauderdale County, Alabama.

Leroy M. “Lee” Huggins’ father was John Morris Huggins and Caroline Bower Huggins, according to Lee M. Huggins’ death certificate.  Both Leroy M. Huggins were evidently called “Lee M.” and their names appear as such in many records. This Leroy M. Huggins’ middle name was Montgomery, like his grandfather James Montgomery Huggins.

Leroy M. Huggins was listed in his father’s household on the 1850 census record in McNairy County, Tennessee. On the 1860 census record where he resides in the Gravel Hill community in McNairy County, Tennessee he is married and has one small child. His wife is listed as S.D.E. as a given name. Their child is one year old George M. Huggins [which likely is Georgia Ann Huggins, a daughter and there was an enumeration error]. Included in the household are W. E. English, 28 years old, and John English, 26 years old. Leroy sold the store he owned at Gravel Hill in McNairy County, Tennessee to John R. Gooch in 1899. He was secretary for many years for the Masonic Lodge after it was organized in 1853. He was postmaster at Gravel Hill from 1847 to February 1867, and again later to September 1868. Leroy and his brother Leander moved to Corinth, Mississippi, where they established a general merchandise business.”

Leroy M. Huggins married Sarah Della Elizabeth  (1837-1921) on 5 December 1854. She was the daughter of Ephriam and Sarah Davenport Sheffield. The 1860 census record listed the couple with their first child as George M. Huggins, male, age one; that must have been an error on the enumerators part. Children of “Lee” and “Lizzie Huggins” were:

  • Georgia Ann Huggins Inge (1859 -1937)                                                                                                       
  • Della Elizabeth Huggins Taylor (1869 – 1956)                                                                                            
  • Virginia “Virgie” Clyde Huggins Young (born 1879 ) 
  • Sarah Frances Huggins
  • Alice Lee Huggins born ca 1863
  •  Mary Ella Huggins 1867 – 1943
  • James Ephriam Huggins 1873 – 1962
  • Edna Huggins born ca 1878

Daughter Virgie C and her husband Herbert Young are in the household with Elizabeth Huggins in both 1900 and 1910 census. They live on Judson in Corinth; and Elizabeth has seven children living of eight born. Daughter Georgie Inge is in her household on the 1920 census record. In 1920 they reside on Jackson Street in Corinth, Mississippi.  Elizabeth Sheffield Huggins is listed as having seven children living of eight born to her on the 1920 census.

Son James Ephraim Huggins’ death certificate gave the place of birth for his mother as Colbert County, Alabama. On his WWI Draft Registration the following information is obtained: lives at Rt 2, Rienzi, Mississippi; 45 years old, farms for self; nearest relative is wife Maggie Huggins; medium build and height, blue eyes, light hair, not bald. On his death record the following information is obtained: cause of death is Sarcoma of right mandible/metastares and malnutrition, wife was Margaret Frances Huggins who had died 24 Sep 1942.  He is buried at New Hope Cemetery, his parents were Lee and Elizabeth Huggins.

There is enough discrepancy in records to cast a big shadow on relations of the Huggins’ families. Some records show that Meredith Stanford Huggins was the son of William Franklin Huggins, who in turn is the son of John Morris Huggins. There should be enough valid information that family of the Huggins’ lines might be able to sort it out, but we only go on what information seems relevant for this treatise.

Leroy Montgomery Huggins son, Merideth S “Minty” Huggins was born 15 Sep 1854 in Guys for Gravel Hill, McNairy County, Tennessee and died 27 Feb 1929 in Guys, Mcnairy County, Tennessee. Merideth S “Minty” Huggins married Sarah Caroline Farris Faires 1853 – 1927. Their known children are: Louella Huggins South 1875 – 1971, Elenander Huggins 1877 – 1965, Elvin Huggins Mills 1878 – 1946, Julius Huggins  born 1880, Elmer Huggins 1881 – 1942, Mamie Huggins born 1883, Robert L Huggins 1885 – 1968, Willie Huggins born 1888, Lora Bell Huggins 1891 – 1928, Lillie Mae Huggins 1892 – 1936 and Clayton Huggins 1895 – 1967.

Merideth S ” Minty  Huggins’ daughter’s name is sometimes given as Lara Bell or Lora Bell. She married William Edgar Curtis 1888 – 1942. Their children were: Ulas Curtis born 1910, Rubie Curtis born 1915, Bertha L Curtis born 1917, Maggie Curtis 1919 and Euthel Lee Curtis 1920 – 1985.

Lara Bell Huggins Curtis lived at Ramer #2 in McNairy County, Tennessee. The Tennessee, Deaths and Burials Index, 1874-1955 provides the following information:

  • Name: Lara Bell Curtis[Lara Bell Huggus]
  • Birth Date: abt 1890
  • Birth Place: Mcnairy County, Tennessee
  • Age: 38
  • Death Date: 9 Jan 1928
  • Death Place: Ranier, McNairy
  • Burial: Gravel Hill Cemetery

William Edgar Curtis was born 1 Feb 1888 in Mcnairy County, Tennessee. He died 28 Jun 1942 in Bolivar, Hardeman County, Tennessee. On his World War I Draft Registration on 5 June 1918 the following information is given: his residence is Guys, McNairy County, Tennessee, he is 29 years old, farms for himself, has a wife and three children at dependents, he is medium height and build, he has dark blue eyes and dark hair but is not bald.

At age 40, he marries Maggie Luvenia Laughlin in McNairy County, Tennessee on 25 Feb 1928. The record gives the name was W. E. Curtis, so it is presumed that it was William Edgar Curtis; on the 1930 census record for Beat 1 in Alcorn County, Mississippi  the children listed match the younger ones of his marriage to Lara Bell Huggins. There are two more children born to William Edgar Curtis by his second wife, Lavenia. They are: Idotha Curtiss born 1928 in McNairy County, Tennessee, and Charlie Curtiss born 1930 likely in Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi. Louvenia Laughlin married first to a Gadbury and had a family of children; and married William Edgar Curtis after both had become widowed.

William Edgar Curtis’s parents, according to his death record are James “Jim” Curtis and Josephine “Josie” Jones. The scant information on the parents are this: Jim Curtis was born circa 1865 in Alabama. There is a Josie Jones on the 1880 United States Federal Census record for Lauderdale County, Alabama. It gives her birth year as 1868, born in Alabama; that she is white and single, her mother and father were born in Alabama; and her occupation is a nurse. She is in the household of John A and Sarah A Potts and their three small children. Nothing further is found on Jim and Josie Jones Curtis.

William Edgar Curtis may have had at least one sibling, that of George Washington Curtis 1886 – 1939.  George W Curtis was born in Alabama and died in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee. He appears to have had two wives, both marriages officiated in Alabama.  One wife was Hattie B. and they had a child named Catherine T Curtis born circa 1918. Minnie P or F Plaxco and George W Curtis married 26 Jun 1902  in Franklin County, Alabama. They had at least one child, Ullman P Curtis  born 1903 and died 1904. In 1910 George W Curtis was in Sebastian, Arkansas. By 1920 he was in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama and was a broom maker and peddler. By 1930 he lived in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee and his occupation was Furniture repair man; was widowed; married at age 25; and lives alone. He died 20 Oct 1939 ; he was age 53, divorced, cause of death an accidental fall from a two-story building onto the driveway.

William Edgar Curtis and Lara Bell Huggins Curtis’ son, Euthel Lee Curtis was born 16 Apr 1920 likely in Corinth, Alcorn County, Mississippi. He died 28 Oct 1985 in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama. He married Dorothy Aileen “Dot” Mobley born 16 Dec 1923 in Alabama. She died 1 Dec 1990 in Colbert County, Alabama.  Her parents were  J Sid Mobley (born 1890) and May Mobley (born 1899).

Euthel Lee and Dot Mobley Curtis’ son, David L Curtis was born 1942 in Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama. David Curtis married Joan Thompson and are the parents of: David Shawn Jones Curtis, Mary Allison Curtis Nichols, Victoria Leigh Curtis Davis, Beverly Joan Curtis Smith Foust, and Elizabeth Aileen Curtis Shelton.

The following is added because there are implications that this William Edward Curtis may be related to James “Jim” Curtis. Dr. W. E. Curtis, was born March 27, 1833 in Henry County, Tenn., an dis one of seven children born to John and Sarah (Sessams) Curtis, two daughters and our subject being the present surviving members of the family. The father was born in North Carolina, moved to Humphreys County, Tenn., when young, married there, then moved to Marengo

photo of Dr. William Edward Curtis

Dr. William Edward Curtis

County, Ala., about 1815, remained there engaged in farming two years, then moved to Stewart County, Tenn., and in 1826 to Henry County, being one of the early settlers in both counties. He resided in Henry County, farming, till his death in 1872. His wife died in 1854. Our subject remained with his parents until he attained his majority, then accepteda clerkship in a store at Paris, Henry Co., Tenn., remaining there until 1856, when he embarked in the drug business at the same place, which he continued a few years, when he commenced the study of medicine, attending the medical university at Nashville, during the sessions of 1859-61, and graduated. He began the practice of medicine in Carroll County, locating at McKenzie in 1878. During the war he was surgeon in 1861. Dr. Curtis married Harriet Looney, daughter of Dr. J. D. Looney, now deceased. From this union were born two daughters: Harriet Ella, and Alice, both living. Their mother died in 1865, and in 1866 Dr. Curtis married Ann E. Carson; from this marriage resulted these children: two sons and a daughter—John William, Lillian Howard and Thos. C., deceased. On Dr. Curtis’ father’s old place in Henry County is a very large Indian mound forming a perfect square and containing one and a half acres; the elevation is about seven feet and is used as a building site. The Doctor has two farms in Carroll County of 100 acres each; on one is located a grist-mill; also has a residence in McKenzie. He and his family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is also a member of the F. & A. M. [from Goodspeeds History Of TN ]

An ancestor of Dr. William Edward Curtis was Samuel R Curtis of Marengo County, Alabama. Samuel Curtis, during the revolution was a Regulator from Anson County, North Carolina; he was a Patriot and furnished supplies to the army.

The Samuel R Curtis House, also known as the Howze-Culpepper House, is a historic house in Demopolis, Alabama, United States. It is a brick structure that was built in 1840 by Samuel Curtis, a Revolutionary War veteran who was born in Queen Anne’s County, Maryland in 1751 and died in Marengo County, Alabama in 1846. The house was built in the Federal style, with the later addition of a Greek Revival influenced portico. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on 11 April 1977.

 

What a beautiful photograph…

of a distinguished gentleman.photograph of William Thomas Barron

William Thomas Barron was born in 1825 and died in 1917 in Mississippi.

The photo is posted here because he is a relation to the Barron family from Sheffield.