The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Carolyn Murray Greer

That Menefee man in Tuscumbia…

English: "The Fall of the Alamo" by ...

“The Fall of the Alamo”  painting

was John Southerland. But his brother George Southerland was business owner and then in partnership with John in Tuscumbia; and their father, John Sutherland is buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia. John’s nephew, William DePriest Sutherland attended LaGrange Military Academy before heading to Texas and his name is mentioned in numerous accounts of the events.

The Fall of the Alamo is widely documented that any prominent name associated with it was bound to be accounted for and documented as well. Dr John Sutherland is also associated with The Scrape in Texas history. An account of the fall of the Alamo is written by a granddaughter of John Southerland. Below is a reprint of the copy found at tamu.edu:

The Fall of the Alamo
By Dr. John Sutherland
©1936, The Naylor Company, San Antonio, Texas.

Written in 1860 and now published for the first time an authentic account of that tragic event in the history of Texas compiled from facts known to the author and supported by evidence of others who were witnesses to the siege and fall of the Alamo together with a sketch of the life of the author by his grand-daughter — Annie B. Sutherland.

Sketch of the Life of Dr. John Sutherland

Dr. John Sutherland was born in Virginia May 11, 1792 on Dan River near the site of the present town of Danville.His father Captain John Sutherland, or Sutherlin as the name was then called, was an officer in the Revolutionary War. Of sturdy Highland Scotch descent, his forefathers emigrated to America in the early days of its history.Captain John Sutherland with his family, following the westward trend of emigration, moved from Virginia to Tennessee in 1805 and settled on Clinch River, where he kept a ferry known as Sutherland’s Ferry. At the age of young manhood, John Sutherland, Jr. went to Knoxville where for several years he clerked in a store for a man named Crozier. Later he became a partner in the firm.

Photo of Dr John Sutherland

About 1824 he moved with his family to Decatur, Alabama, where for a time he was president of a bank. After a short time he moved to Tuscumbia, Alabama, and entered into the mercantile business with his brother George. They traveled on horseback to Philadelphia and Baltimore where they bought their merchandise, which was hauled in wagons to Tuscumbia. About 1827-28, through unfortunate business ventures, the firm became financially embarrassed and in 1829 closed up its business.

In December of that year George Sutherland moved to Texas and settled on the Navidad River at a place now in Jackson County. During the winter of 1829-30 several other related families emigrated to Texas and settled in Austin’s Colony, taking out grants of land and establishing homes under the liberal colonization laws governing Texas.

Meanwhile the subject of our sketch remained in Tuscumbia, practicing medicine under the old Thompsonian System. He continued the practice of medicine through the succeeding years of his life, and in the 50’s, when cholera swept through the Southern States, he distinguished himself by discovering a cure for that dread malady, whereby he never lost a case not already in the last stages of the disease. Dr. Sutherland freely passed his great discovery on to other doctors for the relief of suffering humanity.

In December, 1835, Dr. Sutherland, Captain William Patton and several others visited Texas with a view to settling on lands which the Mexican government offered as an inducement to settlers to make homes in Texas.

Arriving at San Felipe they took the oath of allegiance to the new government. They then proceeded toward San Antonio. Meeting General Sam Houston, then in command of the Texian forces, he advised them against going on to San Antonio, saying that he had ordered all troops to fall back east of the Guadalupe River.

The party however went on to San Antonio, arriving there on the 18th of January, 1836. The accompanying account of the “Fall of the Alamo” by Dr. Sutherland gives his connection with that tragic event in the history of Texas.

After the fall of the Alamo, General Houston sent messages by Dr. Sutherland to President David G. Burnet after which President Burnet appointed him one of his aides-de-camp, sending him a written order 1 to facilitate the retirement of the women and children over Groce’s Ferry to the east side of the Brazos River. Having accomplished this mission, Dr. Sutherland returned to Harrisburg, when President Burnet appointed him his private secretary, which position he held until after the battle of San Jacinto and peace was assured. Then he returned to his family in Tuscumbia, Alabama. In the fall of 1837, having closed up his business in Alabama, he brought his family to Texas, reaching the settlement known as Egypt in December. Next year he built a home on the west side of the Colorado River, four miles from Egypt, where he lived until the fall of 1849, when he moved to what is now known as Wilson County, settling near the Sulphur Springs on the Cibolo River. He was the founder and proprietor and first post master of the little town of Sutherland Springs. A lover of education, he encouraged and supported schools in our pioneer State for his own and his neighbor’s children, and when he had provided his children with the best advantages available here, he sent them off to higher institutions of learning. A devout Christian from early manhood, he gave freely of his substance to the building of churches and the support of the ministry. His house was ever the retreat of the wayfarer and the welcoming home of the homeless and needy. He died at his home at Sutherland Springs, April 11, 1867, at the age of seventy-four years and eleven months and is buried in the Sutherland family lot in the Sutherland Springs Cemetery which was a gift from himself to the town. Over his grave and that of his third wife, his surviving children erected a substantial monument. He died as he had lived, a pioneer, a patriot, a Christian gentleman. This sketch of his life is affectionately dedicated to his memory by his grand-daughter.

Annie B. Sutherland

 

This John Sutherland was one of the sons of the John Southerland who is buried at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia; and the sister of our Agnes Sutherland Menefee. Dr John Southerland married as his second wife a girl from Cherokee, Ann Bryan Lane 1800 – 1840. Their children were: George Quinn Sutherland 1829 – 1869, Levin Lane Sutherland  1832 –  , Jack Sutherland 1838 – 1922 and Margaret Ann Sutherland who was born and died 1840. Next comes an excerpt from a writing about Sutherland Springs, Texas:

One cannot read about, speak about or visit Sutherland Springs, Texas  without running into the name of Dr. John Sutherland. The Sutherland’s ancestry can be linked to castle Dunrobin in the northern most county of Scotland. Very fitting is the Sutherland clan’s motto “Sans Peur” or “without fear.” John was born to a Revolutionary war captain in 1792 in Danville, Virginia. In 1805 the Sutherland family was on the move to Tenessee where John’s father worked on a ferry on the Clinch River. John entered the working life of a store clerk, working his way up very quickly. In 1816 he married Diane Kennedy and moved to Decatur, Alabama. By 1824 he was the president of a bank. The bank failed miserably and in 1826 John and his family moved to Tuscumbia, Alabama to form a partnership in a small merchantile with his brother George. Again John’s business failed, feeling a little beat, George left Alabama and joined Austin’s Colony with an eye to homestead for the both of them. John stayed in Tuscumbia.

 In 1827, John’s wife Diane passed away. John was left alone. Determined to take care of his aging father and daughter, he began attending medical school. He had a facination with treating disease with steam and local herbs.

 John married Ann Bryant Lane, opened a practice in Tuscumbia and was doing well for his family, but Texas called to him. He was again on the move on December 12, 1835. He swore allegiance to Texas and became a citizen. He was joined by his brother George’s son William and headed off to the Alamo to help the sick. While out riding he was injured and could not fight, so Col. Travis sent him to bring help, but he returned too late. Lying among the dead was his nephew William De Trest Sutherland. After the Revolution, John settled in Egypt. Then, his second wife died in 1840. In the mid 1840’s John married his third wife Ann Dickson and in 1849, they moved into present day Sutherland Springs.

 John immediately recognized the powers of the springs and set up shop. Though he did not attain great wealth he did establish the postal service of Sutherland Springs, (coincidentally the longest continuously running post office in Texas). He became Postmaster, Justice of the Peace and opened the first school and platted the townsite, all the while practicing medicine.


Menefee men…

Elkton, Tennessee in 1909.

were very important to American history and to our Peebles family history. There are several William Menefee’s and there seems to be some confusion about our William Menefee. The article below came from the Bulletin of the Giles County Historical Society, it reads:

Bulletin, Giles County Historical Society,Volume III, Jan 1979- Oct 1981.Soldier-American Revolution Buried in Giles County, TN
[submitted by Mrs. Urban Smith in 1981]
William Menefee Sr was born in Culpepper County, Virginia in 1750, son of Jarrett Menefee [Re War soldier b 1720, died in KY 1811] and his wife, Agnes [Sutherlin] Menefee.
William Menefee Sr settled at Elkton, Tennessee [first settler in the area] and with him came Benjamin Long, Thomas Philips and Jonathan Ridgway, who settled just over the line in what became Limestone Co AL.

William arrived from Lincoln County, KY in the fall of 1807 and died the
following spring, 8 March 1808.
He was married 1st in Virginia but her name is unknown. He had three sons by
this marriage; Thomas, George and Richard [Dickie] Menefee.They stayed in Kentucky.

William Menefee Sr. married 2nd 19 Dec. 1774 in Fincastle Co VA to Elizabeth Vardeman, daughter of John Vardeman [born in Sweden in 1718], [ Sol of Am Rev War] and his wife Elizabeth Morgan of Bedford Co VA. Elizabeth Menefee died at Elkton, Giles Co TN in 1820.
William Menefee served in Col. Benjamin Logan’s Company as Sgt. and also
served as private in the Company of Capt. Boyles in April, 1780, stationed
on Dix River in Lincoln Co KY.

Children of William and Elizabeth [Vardeman] Menefee were;
4. John b Lin Co KY in 1783, married there in 1892 to Mary Rentfro of KY and
VA, died in Limestone Co AL in 1875.
5.   Nancy born in 1778 in KY, married Dec 19, 1792 to Benjamin Long; came to
this area and settled near the present site of Delrose.
6.   William Jr. born in KY in 1781, married Lavinia ___ in KY, died in Giles
1854/56.
7.   Lucinda born 1788 in KY, married in Giles Co to Alexander Laughlin in
1810
8.   Renlar born 1796 in KY, twin of Laban.
9.   Laban born 1796 in KY, twin of Renlar, married Lucy Amanda Young and went
to Texas and joined the Austin Colony about 1835.
10.  Elizabeth born 1778, married in Lin. Co KY June 17, 1792 to Jonathan
Ridgeway; lived in Limestone Co AL in area of Shoal Creek and Blue Springs.
11.  Jarrett came from Lincoln Co KY in 1809 and bought land in dist. no 1,
Giles Co but sold it about 1835 and went to Texas when his brother, Laban
went. Jarrett married Sally Simpson in Davidson Co, TN

According my research findings, Jarret (sometime listed as Jarrod) Menefee is not his parent. In fact, there is no evidencefound that suggests that Agnes Sutherland was ever married to Jarret Menefee although definitely kin to him through her husband. My research shows William Menefee as his father and his mother as Agnes Sutherland. William Menefee was born 11 May 1796 in Knox County, Tennessee and died 29 October 1875 in Flatonia, Fayette County, Texas. His first wife was named Mildred Gaines and were married in 1746, and they had the following children: Nancy Menefee 1758 – 1840, Richard Dicky Menefee 1767 – 1815, Thomas Menefee born 1770, George Menefee 1771 – 1840 and John Menefee 1777 – 1824. There was a second marriage to Amelia Milly Scruggs 1750 – 1773, whom he married in Kentucky in 1769. The graphic below has a photo of William Menefee. There is one researcher that has this photo attached to his father who is also William Menefee. The dates on the graphic have now to be corrected: Lucinda Menefee  was born 1779 in Lincoln, Kentucky, United States and died Aug 1880 in Giles, Tennessee near Elkton.

photo of William Menefee

William Menefee’s third wife was Elizabeth Vardeman as written above. Virginia Marriages to 1800 the following information on the marriage: Spouse 1:Menifee, William;   Spouse 2: Vardeman, Elizabeth;  Marriage Date: 19 Dec 1774;   Marriage Location: Virginia, Montgomery County. There are some researchers that have a twelfth and a thirteenth child, Bathsheba Menefee. A Bathsheba, sometimes written as Barsheba, married twice; first to James Duncan rightly spelled Dunkin and secondly to John Cowan. There is also another daughter that many researchers have in their family history and that is C Dorcas Vardeman Menefee born 2 September 1802 in Lincoln County, Kentucky and died 20 April 1883 in Marlin, Falls County, Texas. She married David Barclay or Barkley in Giles County, Tennessee and later moved to Texas. It is possible both girls are their children, but that has not been proven yet.

William Menefee was a Soldier during the Revolutionary War. That has been proven.  His father was a soldier and many of his male kin were also, some of them quite heroic. An interesting aspect is that William and Elizabeth Vardeman are named in a genealogy done that purports to be for Muhammed Ali, formerly Cassius Clay, who was born in Kentucky. The connetion to them is through their daughter, Barsheba Menefee who married James Duncan; they are given as Muhammed Ali’s great-great-great-grandparents. A disclaimer on the data reads: Ancestry of Muhammad Ali compiled by William Addams Reitwiesner; The following material on the immediate ancestry of Muhammad Ali should not be considered either exhaustive or authoritative, but rather as a first draft.  Here’s the punch line, and if you dance like a butterfly and sting like bee, then you know know how. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) publishes a Patriot Index, a list of persons whose honorable service in the cause of independence during the American Revolution renders their female descendants eligible for membership in the NSDAR. Several ancestors of Muhammad Ali appear in the Patriot Index, including

  • William Duncan (number 228)
  • William Menefee (number 230)

  • Charles Morehead (number 112)
  • Mrs. Kerrenhappuch Norman Turner (number 227)
  •  John Vardeman (number 462)

The following excerpt came from A Brief Sketch of the Settlement and Early History of Giles County Tennessee by James McCallum, 1876

William Menefee, Sr., and his sons, John and William, and his son-in-law, Benjamin Long, were among the first settlers. They came from Lincoln County, Kentucky; traveled what was called the Kentucky trace; came over the Cumberland Mountains, crossed Elk River near the head of it; came along [Page 42] the State Line and the old man Menefee stopped on the South side of the river opposite Elkton and settled above the ferry where Samuel Fain afterwards put up a distillery. This was about the middle of November, 1808. The old man died the following March. John Menefee settled soon afterward on the Huntsville road three miles South-east of Elkton where William S. Ezell now lives. William Menefee Jr., settled one mile North of his brother John. Benjamin Long settled half a mile North of Elkton where Dick Baugh lives at the Big Spring, near where Hanserd lives. No person then lived in Elkton. Benjamin Long was the first to settle near the town. Mrs. Lucinda Laughlin, who is a daughter of William Menefee, Sr., and a sister of Benjamin Long’s wife says she was nearly twenty years of age when her father came; that there was not a “cane amiss” where Elkton is situated. She says, at the time her father came, John Shoemaker was living at the ferry on the river above Elkton called Shoemaker’s ferry near where the old McCutcheon trace crossed the river. She was married the eighth of March, 1810, to Alexander Laughlin by Wm. Phillips, Esquire. The license was the first issued by German Lester, Clerk of the County Court, etc., and is now in the possession of Captain George Bowers. She was twentyone years old when she married Alexander Laughlin; then lived on the South side of the river at Shoemaker’s ferry, and was here a year before her father came. He kept salt and flour to sell. He came from East Tennessee, came down the Holston in a boat and brought salt and flour. He and two of the Massengales, brothers of his first wife, owned a boat; they lived on the Holston and boated down salt, flour, and other commodities and Laughlin sold for them. Of the first settlers now living (1876), Mrs. Laughlin was older when she came than any I have conversed with in the last year. I have conversed with none who has a more vivid and distinct recollection than she has of early times. She states that at the time her father moved to this County, her brothers Renlar and Laban were boys living with her father, and her brother Jarrett Menefee came out the next Fall. William Phillips and Benjamin Long were appointed Justices of the Peace in 1809. They were the first Magistrates in the Southern part of the County. Captain Thos. Phillips built the first house in what [Page 43] is now the town of Elkton the latter part of 1810.

The Lucinda Menefee mentioned in the book above was Lucinda Menefee, seventh child of William Menefee the Revolutionary Soldier. And she was the same Lucinda Menefee who married Alexander McLaughlin. The McLaughlin named has been spelled variously as Loftin, Laughland, McLaughland, etc. Lucinda Menefee and Alexander Laughlin  had the following known children: Priscilla M Laughin born ca 1811 and Elizabeth Octavia McLaughlin 1813 – 1870. It is through Elizabeth Octavia Laughlin  that is my family’s ancestor; she married John M Peebles in Limestone County in 1833. John M Peebles and Elizabeth Octavia Menefee Peebles died in Giles County, Tennessee, but their graves have not been located to date.

This William Menefee’s father, William Menefee, was an amazing man – a true hero. William Menefee and his brother John were listed as early settlers in Franklin County, Virginia with John Menefee located at Rocky Mount and Wiliam Menefee located near Old Pleasant Hill Church. This information came from the Settlement Map of Franklin County, VA, that was prepared for the January 1, 1976, Bicentennial Celebration. It should also be noted that while the original map indicates that settlers are listed from 1786 to 1886, in actuality they are listed from 1743 to 1850.

Wiliam Menefee, the elder, was born 11 May 1796 in Knox County, Tennessee and died 28 October 1875 and was first interred near his home in Flatonia, Texas.  In 1936, the remains of William MenefeePhoto of the historical marker honoring Willliam Menefee and his wife, Agnes Sutherland Menefee, were re-interred with full honors in the Texas State Cemetery in recognition of his service to the Republic of Texas.

No information on his early life is unknown until 1824. That is when his family moved to Alabama, by this time he was a practicing lawyer. In 1830 he, his wife Agnes Sutherland Menefee, and their seven children moved to Texas, settling in Colorado County. Their seven children were probably John, Nancy, William, Lucinda, Laban, Elizabeth, and Jarret.  It is presumed that son, Renlar a twin to Laban had died at an early age. William and son Laban made quite a name for themselves, each fighting for the Independence of what would become the Republic of Texas.

William Menefee was well respected in Texas, being one of the few lawyers in the territory; there he was elected judge in January of 1836. William was one of the two delegates from Colorado County selected to attend the Convention of 1836 at Washington-on-the-Brazos to discuss the coming secession and war with Mexico; it was there he became one of the signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence. He returned home, later that year being appointed the chief justice of Colorado County. The next year, he began taking greater steps in establishing the new Republic. He served in the Texas Congress from 1837 to 1841, and served again from 1844 to 1845. He was one of five commissioners who selected Austin as the new capital in 1839. In 1840 he was nominated as Secretary of the Treasury, although the nomination was later withdrawn. He moved to Fayette County in 1846 and represented them in the State House of Legislature. William Menefee died on October 29, 1875 and was buried near his home in Flatonia, formerly known as Oso. Agnes Sutherland Menefee, wife of William Christian Menefee, signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence, was born in Virginia, possibly Pittsylvania County, on August 22, 1794, to John Sutherland, a captain in the American Revolutionary War, and Agnes Shelton.

On February 28, 1859, at the age of 64, Agnes passed away. She was buried in Pine Springs Cemetery in Oso, the community that arose around the Menefee’s land. Some 16 years later, William passed away on October 29, 1875, and was buried next to his beloved wife. As a part of Texas Centennial celebration in 1936, William and Agnes Menefee, along with numerous other Texas heroes, were re-interred in the Texas State Cemetery in Austin on Sunday, March 22, 1936. Their final resting place should make the whole family of descendants proud for generations. Texas State Cemetery is in Austin and the plot’s location coördinates are: Republic Hill Section 1 Row U Plot 8  GPS (lat/lon):  30.15921, -97.43646

The William Menefee listed above as having an accepted DAR application is the husband of Agnes Sutherland. Her father, John Sutherland also fought in the Revolutionary War. He was born 19 Jul 1752 in Pittsylvania, Virginia and died on 7 Sep 1836 in Tuscumbia, Colbert, Alabama, USA. He is buried at the Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Colbert County, Alabama. Photos related to him with follow.

Photo of William Menefee's gravemarker

John Vardeman, Amaziah Vardeman, Laban Menefee, and  Wiliam Menefee are just some of those of the family of Menefee/Vardeman who served during the Revolutionary War. More history follows:

William Menefee in history book page 28

Willam Menefee in history book page 29

 

Photos pertaining to Agnes Southerland Menefee’s father, the Revolutionary War Soldier, who is buried at Oakwood Cemetery, Colbert County, Alabama. Robert Duncan Peebles (and his wife Betty Drue Jane Tolbert Peebles) are also buried there. Robert Duncan Peebles is a descendant of the Southerland, Menefee and Peebles allied lines.

Photo of the DAR marker on John Southerland's grave in Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Photo of the DAR marker on John Southerland’s grave in Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Photo of John Southerland's marker on his grave at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Photo of John Southerland’s marker on his grave at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Gravemarker of John Southerland, Revolutionary War soldier at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

Gravemarker of John Southerland, Revolutionary War soldier at Oakwood Cemetery in Tuscumbia, Alabama.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


History gone…

again. The photo below is of the Old Mel White homeplace on Bumpass Creek Road in Lauderdale County, Alabama. The owners are pictured and are identified as Mel and Elizabeth Scott White.

Mel White homeplace on Bumpass Creek Road


J T Flagg Knitting Mill…

was a place where lots of Shoals area people were employed at one time. The following photograph shows the workers. The date of the photograph is not known, or the name of the workers. Any help in making identification would be appreciated.

photo of workers at J T Flagg Knitting Mill in Florence Alabama in an undated photo


Weeden Heights School…

in an old photo.

old photo of Weeden Heights School in Florence AL


A 1937 photo of a beautiful Shoals lady…

can you be the first one to identify her?

This is a 1937 photo from the Junior Class at Florence State Teacher’s College annual. It was the first annual for Florence State.

Linnie Beckman 1937


Precious are the memories…

even if only in the form of a photograph. Lee Murray and Buddy Jackson have shared information and this photo on our shared Murray lines. My third great-grandfather, John M Murray, and his parentage is still a brick wall for all of us researchers. But it seems in the electronic age that more sharing is possible without travel. John M Murray was one of the north Alabamians who joined with Andrew Jackson in the fight with the native Americans in the Creek War (often referred to as the War of 1812). The most famous battle remembered from that conflict is the Battle at Horseshoe Bend.

John M Murray died at Vance’s Station according to his obituary. He was 99 years of age at death. He had survived several wives and had more than one set of children. His last wife was Jane Pierson/Pearson who was much his junior. She drew a widow’s pension from his war experience. One of their sons was named Marshall Winchester Murray. The photo below shows possessions of John M Murray and others that belonged to his son Marshall. The powder gourd, hunting horn, wooden box and shoe repair belonged to John Murray.  The rest belonged to his son Marshall.  The wooden box is cut out of a single piece of wood with leather hinges.  He kept his tax papers in it. This photo of their treasures means as much to me as does the plug of tobacco that was left by my great-grandfather, Levi Murray.

Photo of John M Murray and Marshall W Murray possessions


So there are people other than me working on family history…

and a nice surprise came in my email today. Family researchers on collateral lines to my Murray family are now participating in DNA research as well. One of them sent me this photo of a railway ticket that one of our ancestors bought in 1863. A cousin in Birmingham has the original. It is a ticket that James T Murray purchased in 1863. He died that same year. He died while serving as a  the War Between the States as did his brother-in-law, John Lawrence, He was but 30 years old. He left a wife and five young children, among them a set of twins.

James T Murray was a son of John M Murray who fought with Andrew Jackson in the Creek War aka the War of 1812. John M Murray was my great-great-grandfather on my paternal side. James Thomas Murray served in the same Company during the War Between the States as did the husband of his sister Sarah Ann Rebecca Murray Lawrence (John Lawrence).  John Lawrence died while being held prisoner of war at Rock Island Prison in Illinois. They both died in the year 1863 and both widows applied for and received Confederate Widow’s pensions. Both served as a Private in Co D of the 6th Regiment of Alabama Volunteers, CSA.  James Thomas Murray’s  wife was Jane Wood Dowdle. His children were: Sarah Elizabeth Murray Lawrence 1854 – 1935, John Robert Murray 1856 – 1938, Mary Jane Murray Wood 1860 – 1928  . William Moore Murray 1860-1904, and David Jefferson Murray 1862-1948. Mary Jane and William Moore Murray were the twins.

Photo of an 1863 railway ticket issued to James T Murray

related posts:

http://rememberingtheshoals.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/bang-bang-bang-again/


Strange that…

two  young women from two different lines of a family could be classmates at college in 1913.

Miss Eulalia Kerby and Miss  Sarah LUTIE Murray were both in the Freshman class at State Normal College in Florence in 1913.

Here is part of the list of freshmen for that class:

Photo of freshman class in year 1913

There is a list of students in the Freshman class of 1913 at State Normal School and this photo. There were no names attached to identify what names match which person.

List of some of the freshman class 1913

Small world.


The Acqueduct on the Muscle Shoals canal…

is the subject of this 1913 photograph.

acqueduct 1913

 


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