The past is the present for future generations who do not know their history

Cherokee

Does anyone recognize exactly where in Florence, Alabama…

this photo may have been taken?

This is William Roscoe McDougal, son of Annie Mae Hand and William Carroll McDougal. The information with the photo says Florence, AL. The girl with him is possibly Lillian Katherine McDonald who became his wife in 1949. William Roscoe was born 3 October 1929 in Colbert County, Alabama. He died 24 August 2003 in Mishawaka, Indiana.

W R McDougal lived in Colbert County where he was born ; then lived at Woodland in Lauderdale County. Annie Mae Hand is the daughter of James Henry Hand and Welthy Ann Alizabeth Pace Hand. He moved to Indiana after 1949 and lived in Mishawaka, St Joseph County, Indiana until his death. He is known to have been in Indiana as early as 1980, but likely before that. More information on the photo and the people would be welcomed.

James Henry “Jim” Hand and Welthy Ann Hand were also the parents of William Riley Hand. William Riley Hand and Josephine Fleming Hand were the parents of Mamie Louanne Hand who married Grady Sledge.

Photo of William Roscoe McDougal


Do you ever wonder what the military men of the past…

think of what is going on in America today? The Shoals area abounds with men and women who have answered their nation’s call, sometimes during war time. We honor all veterans for their service and for protecting our freedom.

Thomas Franklin Woodis is one of those veterans. He served during World War I. Tom enlisted in the Army 6 March 1918 and was released 21 February 1919. He is first row seated on the right in the photograph. He was a very handsome soldier.Photo of Thomas Franklin Woodis in Army during World War I

Tom was born 4 December 1898 in Colbert County, Alabama. The Woodis family lived in Allsboro. Tom Woodis was the child of Charlie Bud Woodis and Lucy Francis McCaig Woodis. He was in a large family of children. His siblings were John Fletcher Woodis, Joseph Andrew Woodis, Charlie H Woodis, Mary Effie Woodis, William Wesley Woodis, Jessie James Woodis, Shelby L Woodis, Roe Harris  Woodis, and Terry Cohal Woodis.

Thomas Franklin Woodis, 90, Route 2, died Thursday, Feb. 9 1989, at Tishomingo County Hopsital, Iuka, Mississippi, after a brief illness.

In addition to being a veteran, he was a Methodist, and a retired farmer. The funeral was held at Alsboro Methodist Church. Burial was at Alsboro Cemetery near Cherokee, Alabama.

Survivors included his wife, Dora M Turner Woodis, Cherokee; son, Arthur Woodis, Cherokee; daughters, Marie Johnson, Lodi, California, Virginia Smith, Golden, Mississippi; and brother Terry Cohal Woodis, Florence; nine grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren. Son Roe Stanley Woodis died at the age of 48. He was a World War II veteran and was involved in a crash of the Sweat’er Out aircraft during the war.


The history of Mountain Mills…

By Lewis C. Gibbs, Jr.

Around 1835, after the Indians were moving to Indian Territory in Oklahoma, the whites began to buy the land west of Caney Creek, the boundary line.
Armstead Barton was the oldest son of Dr. Hugh Barton, one of ten children. He was also Governor of the Mississippi Territory. In this position he became friend to the Colberts, who were leaders of the Chickasaw Indians. Through this friendship, he came into possession of most of the land in the western part of what is now Colbert County.
His brother, Arthur C. Barton, came into possession of most of the land around Barton, Alabama, or range 13 and township 4. The rest of the land in this area was bought by the Prides, the Thompsons, the Rutlands, W. W. Bayless, Hextor Atkisson, the Gibbs brothers (Alexander and Jack or J. E. Sr.) and the Greenhills.
The Hextor Atkinson family lived near the site of the future Mountain Mill Industry Village. The Bayless family lived about a mile east; the Thompson and Rutland families a mile east and south; the Prides about two miles east and A. C. Barton two miles north.
The Hexton Atkisson family consisted of nine children, eight girls and one boy. Bob Garner married one of the girls. Another girl married three times, Mr. Moore, Mr. Donley, and Mr. Whitley. The son married twice, Susan Danley and Lucy Sherrod. His name was Arthur Atkisson. Two of the sisters never married and they out-lived all of them. They later lived at the James S. Barton home which was owned by John Whitley, a nephew. Not only a landowner, Hextor Atkisson was a Justice of the peace for many years. His wife was named Sally Franklin and was said to be from the same family as Ben Franklin. W. W. Bayless was also a Justice of the peace and a large land owner.

INDUSTRY BEGINS

Capt. J. S. Stickels was from the North and connected with steam boating on the Tennessee River before the War between the States, but fought for the South in the war. He was married to Elizabeth Olds, a niece of Mrs. Hextor Atkisson. It is said that he was a brave and courageous soldier and was a gallant defender of the South. He was born April 19, 1827, and died April 5, 1883. His grave was marked in the fall of 1995 in the Atkisson Cemetery.
After the war was over, J. H. Stickels and James Johnston put in a sawmill near the Mountain Mill Village. This mill was powered by steam. Later they put in a grist mill. It was a practice then to use this machinery on Saturday to grind meal. There were two different engines, run by the same boiler.
At a later date, a foundry and machine shop were installed. James Wright was brought in as a pattern maker and machine shop man. He had been in this business all through the war at Florence, Alabama, near where Mars Hill Bible School is today. All of these operations were successful.
Asa Messenger, publisher of the North Alabamian and other publications was encouraging Southerners to start manufacturing their own goods. This would save the high tariff on raw material shipped to the north and the shipping cost to ship the finished product back.
In 1872 the group of men mentioned above, along with N. F. Cherry and others, organized the Mountain Mill Company. Their purpose was to build a cotton mill to make thread from cotton and maybe cloth and other items also.


N. F. Cherry was born in Hardin County, Tennessee, near Savannah. The ten years before coming to Mountain Mills had been spent in merchandising and steam milling.
The Mountain Mill Company started with seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000) in stock. A corporation was formed under the laws of Alabama. Shares were sold to local people. It is said that every rich person in the county bought stock in the company.
The factory was built and machinery from New Jersey was bought and installed. It is said that the machinery was used. The building was a three-story brick and we think it was about 100 feet by 200 feet, with boiler room and engine room attached, with about a 100-foot smoke stack. After the machinery was installed they began to hire people to operate the mill.

Mountain Mills Factory in Cherokee, Alabama

Mountain Mills Factory in Cherokee, Alabama

Some of these families are still in this area, the Blankenships, Burrows, Hargetts, Inmans, Keetons and others. These families consisted mostly of girls. Women and children were used a lot in operating the mill. They also built a company store or commissary. Mr. Houston Ramsey was brought in to operate this business. He is referred to in the East Florence story. Homes for the people and a church and school were built. They built one building and used it for church and school. This building is still in use today in the Barton area by a black congregation.


Some of the preachers that preached at Mountain Mill were E. C. Fuqua, J. D. Tant and others. A professor Blaylock was brought in to run the school. Another teacher was E. C. Hamilton.

Edward C. Fuqua
Preacher at Mt Mills Church

A small town of about three hundred people came together around the mill. It was written that there was no need for law enforcement or courts.
In 1874, more money was needed. Twenty-five thousand dollars in bonds was floated with the German National Bank of Memphis, Tennessee, at 10% interest, payable every six months.
The company operated for twelve years, but seemed to be in financial trouble all the time. Miss Nina Leftwich stated in her book “Two Hundred Years in Muscle Shoals” that this was due to the used machinery that was installed when the operation started.
In 1883, the German National Bank foreclosed on the Mountain Mill Company. We have no record of their closing. We assume that W. N. Cherry bought their stock or debt. On April 7, 1883, W. N. Cherry bought out Arthur C. Barton and W. W. Bayless for $9,100.00. Miss Nina Leftwich said it sold for 5% of the original investment.
After this W. N. Cherry formed a partnership with N. F. Cherry and C. N. Brandon. Mr. Brandon was an experienced cotton mill operator. He came out of Cypress mill, a mill near Florence, which had closed. They invested $100,000.00 in capital stock, brought $35,000.00 worth of new machinery, and began operating in a big way. They loaned money to every farmer in the county. We have a copy of many of the loans on crops and stock and equipment. I believe the mill contracted fro the cotton they raised. However, this is not stated on the loans.
Some of the chief clerks who signed some of the loans are E. C. Hamilton, who is our great uncle; John Whitley, who was a grandson of Hextor Atkisson; Mr. Charles Womble, who was the first Probate Judge of Colbert county; and James H. Simpson. Simpson was connected with the mill in its early stages, but was later in business for himself in Tuscumbia, Alabama. He was our great-uncle twice. He married two of our grandfather’s sisters.
The operation continued for about ten years. In 1892, it was decided to move the mill to Florence, Alabama. We have heard several stories about the reason for moving. One states that the company wanted the county to donate 2,000 acres of land. Another says the roads were barely passable in the winter; therefore, they wanted a railroad spur built to the mill.
We know that this route was considered at one time for a railroad through to Russellville, Alabama, by way of Frankfort.
This is the story of Mountain Mill as I see it from my research and word of mouth all my life.
After 1893, the foundry and machine shops were left in place, and perhaps the sawmill and gristmill. Mr. R. E. Blankenship said he helped move the boiler and machinery to the railroad as a young boy. He was born in 1901.
The picture of the school was made about 1895 or later. Some of the people went to Florence while others stayed and did other things. There is nothing at the site now but briars and bushes.

My mother’s family lived in the store house about 1910. We think the Blankenship family lived in it at one time. About 1915, a sawmill company came into the area and used this for headquarters. Mr. Sam Williams ran a store for them. Some of his family are still in this area. Around 1920, this building was moved to Barton, Alabama by Mr. Sam Williams we think. Some time in the 1950’s this building burned. That was the last of Mountain Mills.

Source: ancestry.com, accessed 2011



Photos of the past…

of relatives  are precious. This one is related to people from Colbert County, Alabama. The soldier pictured is Sam Manford Sledge. He is one of two sons of  Clarence Williamson Sledge and Lillian Claire Manford Sledge; C. W. Sledge is a relative of the Sledge’s from Colbert County. This branch of the Sledge family had relocated to areas in Texas where Sam Sledge was born and raised.

Photo of Sam Manford Sledge


Old photos…

may bring back old memories for those related to the Hayes family in the area. This contains two photos, one of a Hayes couple, and one of their daughter. The photos were likely taken circa 1860. The Hayes family resided in Wayne County, Tennessee.

Photo of Hayes family in Wayne County, Tennessee circa 1860


SOME EARLY SETTLERS OF WAYNE COUNTY

By Charles M. THOMPSON. Reprinted from “The Clifton Mirror”, Clifton, Tennessee, “Anniversary Edition” of 20 October 1905.

“Some time ago the editors of the “Mirror” made a request of Mr. C. M. THOMPSON of Houston to furnish us with her early reminiscences of the early history of Wayne County. Mr. THOMPSON replied with an installment which we published several weeks ago when we published his life sketch. In this second [editor’s note: actually first installment] installment he deals with the early settlers. All Wayne County people in particular will find this article exceedingly interesting. The contribution follows:

Editor’s Mirror,

By your request I will give you now some of the early settlers of Rain’s Creek (now known as Indian Creek).

My father, Zachariah THOMPSON, Jesse CYPERT, and John CYPERT came to Wayne County in the year 1818 together with Francis CYPERT, their father and also the grandfather of the undersigned. Robert CYPERT, a brother of Francis, and a soldier in the war of 1776, came with the above and all settled on Indian Creek.

My father settled the place where Joseph SIMS (the son-in-law of J. N. DAVIS) now lives. This farm has never passed from the connection. Robt. CYPERT, the old soldier, built the first mill on Indian Creek. It was built on the George WHITE farm, a few hundred yards southwest of the corner of J. N. DAVIS’ land and was a failure. The old man then moved up the Creek about seven or eight miles and built a mill on what is known as Johnson’s Fork of Indian Creek, near the place where the Martins Mills now stands. This mill went into the hands of Willoughby PUGH, from PUGH to Samuel COOPER, from COOPER to Archibald WALKER, from WALKER to the CROMWELLS, from the CROMWELLS to the MARTINS, the present owners.

Soon after the CYPERTs came to Indian Creek, Isaac HORTON, an old soldier of the war of 1776, and his three sons, Isaac, Nathaniel and William came to Indian Creek and settled just below the old mill. It might be of interest to record the sons of Jesse, Baker and John CYPERT.

Jesse CYPERT had seven sons. John L. was a Baptist minister (correction: preacher) and was one of the organizers of the Indian Creek Association. Zachariah, William C., James, Thomas P., Robert Jasper and Jesse N. CYPERT. The latter is the only member of the family now living. He resides in Searcy, White County, Arkansas. He served one term as judge of his county. Baker CYPERT had only one son. His name was Samuel and he now resides in the State of Oregon. John CYPERT had six sons, Jesse, Robert, Anderson, Thomas J., John W., and James W. CYPERT. Thomas J. CYPERT was captain of a company in the Federal Army, served in the Legislature of Tennessee two terms as Senator, was assessor of Internal Revenue for the sixth collection district of Tennessee and was a preacher for several years before his death. His brother John was a Captain in the Confederate Army in Arkansas. The members of this family have all passed over the river.

Henry RAYBURN came to the county a little later than the CYPERTs and settled near the mouth of Rayburn Creek, where it empties into Indian creek thence its name.”

C. M. THOMPSON, Martins Mills, Tennessee.

Second Installment, published in “The Clifton Mirror”, 10 November 1905, page 8.

“Inasmuch as my last article missed the waste basket, I will come again. In my former contribution I mentioned Henry RAYBOURNE as being one of the early settlers of this county. It might be well enough to give a short sketch of him and his family.

“Squire RAYBOURNE served for years as justice of the peace for his civil district. He had four sons and three daughters. His oldest son, Gen. John RAYBOURNE was a very prominent man in the county. He was sheriff for a number of terms, surveyor and a state senator. The names of the other three sons were Samuel, Davidson, and Elihu. The latter died young and never married. Squire RAYBOURNE was the grandfather of John A. SMITH and his sister Tennie, who live near Old Town in Hardin County; he was the grandfather of Charley SMITH of Cerro Gordo and of Mrs. Joseph HARRISON living near Saltillo. The two old people, son, daughter and infant are buried in the old apple orchard near the old home.

“Thos. BROOKS settled at an early day and the farm remained in the family for several years. It then passed to Wm. PARKER, father of John Y. PARKER and an uncle of your townsman, C. C. STRIBLING. John Y. PARKER now owns and lives on this farm.

“About a mile above the creek Andrew DOWNING settled. He came with three son: John, William and Jonathan to Indian Creek about the same time BROOKS did. John DOWNING settled across the creek at the place N. W. BRATCHER now lives. Wm. DOWNING, I think, went further down the creek, perhaps in Hardin County. Jonathan remained on the old homestead until about 1860-61 and moved to West Tennessee. After the war, R. J. CYPERT bought him out, the farm having been divided and changed hands several times. John W. MIDDLETON now lives on the Old DOWNING homestead and in the house that DOWNING built.

“The next farm on the creek above was settled by David SHULL. This farm changed hands several times. After SHULL came J. R. HUGHLING, then Col. Jacob BIFFLE (BIFFLE lived on it when the war came up) then Luther FARRIS, an uncle to Dr. Will FARRIS of your town. After FARRIS, A. F. HASSELL, after HASSELL, Daniel EATON, after EATON, James RIGHT and after RIGHT, the present owner Dr. E. R. YEISER.

“The next farm of note that I will mention is that of J. N. DAVIS. It was settled at an early date by David GALLAHER who remained on it for several years. It passed from GALLAHER to Wm. PARKER and from him to his son Frank. From Frank PARKER to Capt. David I. DICKERSON from DICKERSON to the present owner, J. N. DAVIS.

“I will now cross the creek opposite to place of the writer’s birth to the David TACKETT farm. MR. TACKETT was a large land owner. His farm has been divided and sub-divided. The names of the parties occupying the lands formerly owned by TACKETT are Samuel DAVIS, Bart LAY, Will and Marion LINDSEY, Joe ROBERSON, John ROBERSON, Thos. MARTIN, Wm. NOWLIN and Wm. SCOTT.

“This brings me to the Wm. YOUNGBLOOD farm. Mr. YOUNGBLOOD came to Indian Creek at an early date and settled the farm where his grandson Zachariah HORTON now lives. Mr. YOUNGBLOOD raised three children: Josiah, Lidda, the mother of Zachariah HORTON, and John William, the father of Joe and Mat YOUNGBLOOD.”

C. M. THOMPSON, Martins Mills, Tennessee

Third Installment, published in “The Clifton Mirror”, 24 November 1905, page 1

“Here I came again. As I started out to give a short sketch of the early settlers of this section of Wayne County, I will resume by dropped down from upper Indian to what we call lower Indian.

“Squire A. B. GANTT came to Indian creek at a very early date from Bedford County, Tenn. and bought an improvement from an old gentleman by the name of Jesse O’STEEN and settled what is now known as the GANTT farm – I think the second best farm in the county.

“Squire GANTT served several terms as justice of the peace but never held any other county office. He had three sons, L. B., W. M. and A. B. GANTT and several daughters. They have all passed away except three daughters who now reside in Texas. The farm is divided and is now owned by J. Y. PARKER and W. W. JOHNSON.

“I now cross the creek to the farm where Daniel EATON lives. It was settled at an early date by Phillip CANARD who did not live but a few years. His widow remained on the farm until her death. After that it passed to Mr. HERNDON. From HERNDON to J. and E. B. MARTIN, and from MARTIN to the present owner, Daniel EATON.

“I will now cross the creek to the farm settled by George HAWK. It passed from HAWK to David COOK, a great-uncle to your townsman, Dr. COOK. After COOK it passed to Wm. J. STRAYHORN (Mr. STRAYHORN was a very prominent and influential man in this neighborhood). After STRAYHORN to Ledford NEIGHBORS and thence to the present owner, Samuel H. SINCLAIR.

“I see in the last issue an extract from a letter written by Dr. Wm. T. CHILDRESS of Terrel, Texas. He resided just across the creek south of the S. H. SINCLAIR farm and practiced medicine for ten or twelve years. Dr. CHILDRESS is well known in this neighborhood and a man who stood high in his profession.

“I will not give a short sketch of John COOK. He came to Indian Creek at an early date and settled on the farm adjoining Daniel EATON on the West side and lying in the fork of Indian and Weatherford Creeks. Mr. COOK had four sons: David, Martin, Christian and John COOK. The latter is said to have obtained the first marriage license issued in Wayne County. His bride was a Miss MARTIN, a sister of the late John A. MARTIN of Martin’s Mills. Mr. COOK was a German by birth and a hatter by trade. He was the great-grandfather of your townsman, dr. COOK, and the grandfather of H. C. GREESON. Mr. COOK also had three sons by his second wife: Austin, Henry, and Frederick. The latter lives just across the line in Hardin County, on a portion of the land formerly owned by Hugh McCARN.

C. M. THOMPSON, Martins Mills, Tennessee

Fourth Installment, published in “The Clifton Mirror” 22 December 1905.

Mr. C. M. THOMPSON of Martin’s Mills who has been contributing a series of articles to the Mirror on the early settlers of Wayne County continues his histories sketch with the following communication:

“Editors Mirror

“Since my last article found a place on your front page, it is a pleasant inducement for me to write again.

“Continuing a sketch of the early settlers of Indian Creek, I wish to say that Messrs. Frederick ROSE, William BECKHAM and Green BECKHAM came to Indian Creek with or about the time John COOK did. Rose settled the farm across the creek north of the Daniel EATON farm. He had four sons, William, Phillips, Eli and Eanis. All settled in the same neighborhood together with William and Green BECKHAM. The former was the father of Zachariah BECKHAM, who raised twenty-one children to be men and women – fifteen sons and six daughters and all had families. Mr. BECKHAM was married three times.

“I will now pass up Weatherford Fork of Indian Creek, to the farm now known as the John SINCLAIR farm. It was settled by Stephen STUBBLEFIELD about the year 1819 or 20 and passed from STUBBLEFIELD to John SINCLAIR, (father of S. H. SINCLAIR of your town) about the year 1830, and has remained in the family to the present time.

“The above farm adjoining the latter on the south was settled by James SMITH at an early date. It passed from SMITH to William SINCLAIR, a brother of John, and remaind in the family until two or three years ago when it passed to the present owner, Jack BREWER.

“Douglass GILLIS, a Methodist preacher, settled the farm just across the creek, west from the latter and built the first camp ground that was built in this section of the county. Mr. GILLIS sold out to the SINCLAIR’s and mvoed to Horse in Hardin County, where he remained until his death.

“Jas. COPELAND, a brother-in-law of Mr. GILLIS, came to Weatherford’s Fork about the same time GILLIS did and settled the farm adjoining the above. COPELAND had five sons and one daughter. The names of the sons are Thomas S., Daniel G., James D., William and Joseph M. COPELAND. The latter is the grandfather of your townsman, Elihu DAVIS. The COPELAND farm is now owned by J. B. COPELAND, a grandson of the old man, having never massed out of the family.

“I now come to the Pinhook farm as it was known. This farm was settled by William Weatherford (thus the name of the creek) about the year 1818-1819 and was the first settled on the creek. Weatherford was part Indian and claimed to be related to Old Chief WEATHERFORD. He had four sons, Joel, Hill, John and William. The latter died young and never married. The farm passed to the Rev. W. P. KINDRICK.

“Mr. KINDRICK possessed considerable wealth and was above the average ability. He was a fine pulpit and stump orator and was a candidate for Congress at one time being defeated by the Hon. Barkley MARTIN. KINDRICK had three sons, W. P., James, and Clay. The latter died in the Confederate Army and was never married. The first son, W. P. Jr. was a very prominent man and served one term as State Senator and ranked high as an orator. He ran for Congress and was defeated by the Hon. John V. WRIGHT. Mr. KINDRICK was captured while organizing a regiment for the Federal Army and was sent to Libby Prison, and was one of the men who escaped through a tunnel and returned to Clifton. He died soon afterward and was buried in his own garden in Waynesboro, now owned by John F. MORRISON, attorney-at-law.

“James KINDRICK made his home at Florence, Alabama, and represented his county in the state legislature. Rev. Wm. P. KINDRICK was the grandfather of Dr. James BARLOW of Savannah. His wife was a sister of Judge CLAY of Alabama and also a cousin of the great statesman, orator, and politician Henry CLAY of Kentucky. The KINDRICK family have all passed away.

“I will in the near future have something more to say about the early settlers of the Pinhook neighborhood provided it is agreeable with the editor.”

Mirror Editor’s note: “Come ahead, Uncle Charlie, our space is at your disposal. Your article this week is exceedingly interesting and we are sure our Wayne County readers in particular will enjoy it. Ed.”

Fifth Installment, published in “The Clifton Mirror”, 12 January 1906, page 1.

“As I stated in my last communication that I would have something to say concerning a few more of the old settlers in the Pinhook Community and having been granted the permission of the editor to continue this series of articles, I will do so by stating that Gregory SINCLAIR, a brother to John and William SINCLAIR, bought land from Pryor YATES and settled the Pinhook farm, SINCLAIR living on this farm for several years and accumulating considerable property, both real and personal, but concluded that he could do better out west, so he sold to his nephew, William SINCLAIR, a son of John SINCLAIR, who remained on the farm until his death. His widow still occupies the old homestead.

“William SINCLAIR, Jr., was a very prominent man in his neighborhood and was a man of more than the ordinary talent. He served as Justice of the Peace for several years and ranked high as a gentleman, socially, religiously, and masonically.

“The farm adjoining the latter on the south was owned by Richard MOORE (Uncle Dickey), the father of Mastin MOORE of Hardin County and Thos. MOORE of Hardin’s Creek, the father of Richard and Ed MOORE and also the uncle of Dr. K. L. COOK of Clifton.

“The SINCLAIR family, John, William and Gregory, together with their father and two sisters came from Ireland to N.C., thence to Wayne County, Tennessee. John was a horse doctor, William a blacksmith, and Gregory, a weaver.

“The farm adjoining the Pinhook on the East at the mouth of Bear Creek was owned for several years by Benjamin WATKINS, but was sold to Wm. SINCLAIR, Sr. and remained in the family until the old man’s death. Since that time it has changed hands several time. The present owners are John HOUSE and the widow of John D. STRICKLIN.

“The farm adjoining the latter was owned at an early date by Rev. Wm. BAKER, the grandfather of Thos. J. GILLIS, living just across the line in Hardin County. BAKER sold to James A. LAWSON. The farm on the east of this was owned at a very early date by Robert SIMS, the grandfather of Robt. M. SIMS, attorney-at-law, Clifton, and also the grandfather of Thetis SIMS of Linden, the present member of Congress from the 8th district. Mr. SIMS had four sons, M. J., Robert, G. W. (father of Thetis), and A. M. (father of your townsman). SIMS sold to James A. LAWSON.

“The farm adjoining the latter on the east was settled by Nathaniel MARIN [editor’s note – surname probably MARTIN), and passed to Wm. SINCLAIR, Sr., and after him to James A. LAWSON.

“Next comes the farm settled by A. J. MARTIN, which remained in the family until about a year ago when it passed to James M. LAWSON, a grandson of James A. LAWSON.

“The next farm was settled by John N. GILLIS and passed to James A. LAWSON. LAWSON was a large land owner. He had four sons, Samuel, G. W., Thos. J., and John M. LAWSON. They are all living but the latter, and occupy the farms purchased by their father. These farms are all on Bear Creek of Weatherford’s Fork.

“If this misses the waste basket, I will come again. Wishing the editor a happy and prosperous New Year, I am, Yours truly, C. M. THOMPSON, Martin’s Mills.”

Sixth Installment, published in “The Clifton Mirror” 16 February 1906.

“Having been some time since writing you last, I have concluded to write another short sketch of the first settlers of Wayne County.

“Mr. Ben HARDIN, a land speculator, came to the county about 1817 and settled the form now known as the Gallaher farm on Factor’s Fork of Shoal Creek where the old Notchey Trace cross’d said creek (This trace was the road Gen. JACKSON cut on his march from Nashville, Tennessee, to New Orleans, the latter part of the year 1814, just before he fought the battle that is known in history as the battle of New Orleans which occurred on the 8th day, Sunday, January 1815.) The farm is still owned by the GALLAHER heirs having never passed out of the family.

“The farm lying east and adjoining the William YOUNGBLOOD farm, spoken of in an earlier article, was settled by a Mr. James GIPSON in the year 1819 or 1820, passing from him to Elijah HARBOUR. Mr. HARBOUR had three sons, Samuel, Elisha, and Elijah, and two daughters. The two first named settled in Hardin County, Sam settled on Turkey Creek about three miles above Old Town.

“Mr. HARBOUR’s farm was divided and subdivided and finally passed out of the family. Elisha settled on Indian Creek some two miles below the line. The farm settled by HARBOUR is one of the best farms on Indian Creek, this said farm never having passed out of the family. The present owner is the great-grandfather (Ed. – he means great-granddaughter) of the original settler. She is Mrs. Minnie MARTIN and is the daughter of your townsman, Mr. S. H. SINCLAIR.

“Elijah fell heir to his father’s farm and sold it to A. B. GANT and went to Mississippi. Before being divided, this was the best farm in the neighborhood. Mr. GANT divided it between his two sons, L. B. and W. M. GANT. The latter sold his to James HORTON and S. A. KING, while L. B. GANT sold his a few years fore the war between the states to Henry L. BURKETT and went to Texas. When the war came, MR. BURKETT took his family and went South, his oldest son going into the Confederate Army.

“After the war closed they settled in Mississippi and a few years later Frank BURKETT was Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge of the State of Mississippi. Henry BURKETT came back to this state and sold his land to R. C. MARTIN and Mr. MARTIN’s daughter, Mrs. Charles BOYD, is the present owner.

“The farm adjoining the Elisha HARBOUR farm on the east in Hardin County was settled by Kenneth MURCHISON, the great-grandfather of your townsman, Dr. K. L. COOK (this is his name) Said farm passed to Hugh McCARN, who accumulated considerable wealth both real and personal. He had four sons and two daughters by his first marriage and two daughters by his last marriage. The four sons were named Neal, Daniel D., John and William. The latter married but did not live but a year or two. Neal and John emigrated to Arkansas before the war. Daniel G. still remains in this county and is the only member of the family now living so far as the writer knows.

“Mr. McCARN owned a large farm at one time, but it is all owned by other people with the exception of what is owned by Daniel G. and Thomas J. GILLIS, who is a nephew to the old man.

“I guess I had better ring out before my contribution falls into the waste basket.”

Editor’s note: The Sixth Installment was the last article of the series found. If there were other articles contributed by Charles M. THOMPSON, the issues of the newspapers have not survived and therefore the articles are lost.

By way of background for Wayne County, Tennessee this prepares for the next post which will include photos of early Hayes family members and others from early Wayne County, Tennessee.


A photo from times gone by…

is a treasure. This is a photo of Henry Bascomb Sledge (1860-1925), the son of Julia Ann Holloway and Francis Marion Sledge (1811-1900).  He was the grandson

Photo of Henry Bascomb Sledge

Henry Bascomb Sledge

of Zelpha Harris and Collin Sledge.  

Collin Sledge was the son of  John Sledge  and Amy Hartwell Whitfield Chappell Sledge. John Sledge was born 1733 and died 1750. Amy Sledge was born 1755 and died 1798. John and Amy Sledge removed from North Carolina and went to Georgia. From there some of the family moved to Mississippi. John Sledge is a patriot who served in the Revolutionary War. He is buried at Clark cemetery at Whites Crossroads in Madison County, Alabama. That cemetery seems to be one of may that have all but disappeared.

This John Sledge was a brother to Daniel Sledge that was also a Revolutionary Soldier. Daniel was the subject of our previous writing. 

Robert Clark who served as a Revolutionary Soldier and his wife, Rebecca Priscilla Sledge Clark are also buried at Clark Cemetery in Madison County, Alabama. Rebecca Priscilla Sledge was Collin Sledge’s sister. She was born Birth 26 May 1776 in Surry County, Virginia and died 22 Sep 1825 in Madison County, Alabama.


The Goodloe family from Cherokee…

was a large family with roots in the Colbert county area, and well-respected. This photo of one of the sons from the Cherokee, Colbert County family of Goodloes will be a part of the telling of the Goodloe family history and will be featured in our future book. This photo was taken during a family reunion in 1917 in Smyrna, Tennessee. Smyrna is in Rutherford County where this Goodloe son relocated to and raised a family of children. He died and is buried there as well.

photo of the Goodloe family reunion in 1917

Back row, left-to-right:
William Ray Goodloe, Dr. James Bostick, James Camp Goodloe, Jr., Mrs. Max Holland Goodloe (Florence Hull Goodloe), Max Holland Goodloe, Calvin White Goodloe, Frank Grant Goodloe

Front row, left-to-right:
James T. Bostick, Charles Goodloe Bostick, Mrs. Faith Goodloe Bostick, James Camp Goodloe Sr., William H. Bostick, Mrs James Camp Goodloe (Faith White Goodloe), Jean Goodloe, Mrs. Frank G Goodloe (Enna M Goodloe?), Nelle Goodloe

Those in the photograph were named by  the great-grandson of Max and Florence Goodloe and the great-great-grandson of James Camp Goodloe, T. Berkeley Goodloe

James Camp Goodloe married Mary Catherine Kate White and they had the following known children: Faith White Goodloe 1877 – 1971, Camp Lee Goodloe 1880 – 1898, Michael Goodloe 1884 –    (this is possibly same person as Max Holland Goodloe), Max Holland Goodloe 1885 – 1978, Frank Grant Goodloe 1886 –   , William Ray Goodloe 1890 – 1948, Calvin White Goodloe 1891 –  , Thomas B Goodloe 1893 –   , and James Camp Goodloe Jr 1895 – 1941.


For Patricia Moody Rutland…

who posts such wonderful and memorable photos from her past, this is a  token of our appreciation.

The photo is of  Clarence Edward Moody and Effie Alma Rorex from Colbert County, Alabama.

A photo of husband and wife Clarence Edward Moody and Effie Alma Rorex

Clarence Edward Moody and Effie Alma Rorex


Keep this memory close to your heart…

on Christmas this year, my littlest ones. My hope is that you will remember it forevermore. For a little background, I present this:

I was born to be a mother. Now that is a silly statement isn’t it? I have known this deep down in my soul since about a month or so after my fifteenth birthday. At least that is what I wholeheartedly believed, through thick and thin, through tears and heartache, through triumphs and defeat, through love and sorrow. That does not suggest that I was ever a perfect mother, just a mother with a perfect love for her children. My children will likely think I have lost it when, or if, they read this, but what I am trying to convey here is not really for them, it is for the successive generations. I have since seen very clearly that my status as Mother was not really meant to be where I could make a difference. The difference I was born to make was to be the Memory Maker for my descendants. I still have a small pillow that my daughter gave me in the 1980s; on it is embroidered, Moms Make Memories. I guess she knew what my purpose in life was to be before I did.

Family history has always been so important me. The importance really hit home by the time I had lost most of my family elders. This was before my two oldest children were really old enough to know what extended family offered and learned to cherish it. My youngest child has never had a grandfather living during his lifetime or great-grandparents and so on. It was much to my dismay that I realized that my children did not even know who a small portion of their living extended family was; recently some of that has been corrected for my daughter. Growing up, us four (later to be five) siblings basked in the land where our ‘Grands’ and some of the earlier generations were still in our lives. The number of first cousins was huge; and beyond that the relatives were innumerable. Some of our first real true friends were our first cousins. Many remain so today; those who have not stayed in touch remain just as important as well. Beware, what is to come is really mushy expression of love for my family; this is stated so you can exit now if you so desire. For the brave, the story continues…

In 1985 my only grandchild was born. I regret that I failed to really ‘spoil’ him, but circumstances and life are my explanation. I told him once that I would walk in front of a truck for him. I still mean that. Zac Sledge is all grown now and has a family of his own. Now my daughter, mother, myself and others had wanted a little girl in our family for so many years it is not even funny. We have the perfect grandson….time to know perfection through a girl. Well, our wish came true when Zac and Anna Harmon Cain married. Anna is beautiful perfection of what a mother’s love should be.

The truest form of perfection came when my first great-grandchild was born. On December 20th 2005, God gave me the most beautiful set of wings. I have always loved to sing even though I can not carry a tune in a bucket, the cat wails, and my children beg me to just stop it. But the song, “1,2,3 Like a Bird I Sing” became my anthem in honor of that day in 2005. That was the day that the most precious, wonderful, bundle of humanity and love was born into our family; and he is really, really smart, too. Logan Thomas Sledge owns my heart from that day forward. I hum that song almost on a daily basis.

Was I not blessed enough by the birth of Logan? I guess the man upstairs did not think so, or was it Zac and Anna? For on the 31st of May 2009, I got a double set of wings with the birth of another little piece of my heart, Taylor Anne Sledge. The other day her mom posted a video that was actually only captured audio, of my Taylor Anne singing to me. Her brother joined in with her. The song was “Rinky Dinky Do, I Love You” and it was just what I needed and I loved it so. Logan: perfect little man. Taylor Anne: perfect little lady. Both artfully disguised as mere humans, but they are actually little angels and they now have  me singing another song today: “Like a Bird Without Wings.” The video of the song, with Damian McGinty, is sung by Celtic Thunder. The words (yeah, I changed the wording to suit this narrative) of the song will follow at the end of this article.

Celtic Thunder featuring a younger Damien McGinty sings “A Bird Without Wings.”

My strongest wish is that these two little ones grow up with love in a home with both parents present, that they cherish each other, and are always the other’s best friend forever. Sometimes sibling rivalry rears its ugly head, but Taylor Anne has the advantage of being the stronger one while Logan is a thinker. Their mom told me recently that they were aggravating each other when Taylor Anne told Logan, “Bubba, if you don’t stop I am going to beat your brakes off, then you can’t stop.” That was a pretty profound statement coming from a two-year-old. And yes, she calls him Bubba just like I wanted; now if he would only refer to her as Sissy like my Daddy did his little sister that I always thought was so endearing…he called her this all his life long. I also hope that the thoughts expressed here might be preserved for Logan and Taylor Anne as cherished memories from their GG.

Be it known that I love these little souls more than life. Always have. Always will.

Signed,

Love GG

                                                A Bird Without Wings: Lyrics 

Like a bird without wings that longs to be flying,

Like a motherless child left lonely and crying.

Like a song without words,  like a world without music,  

I wouldn’t know what to do  I’d be lost without you watchin’ over me.

 

[Da da da da da repeated as beautiful harmony by George]

 

I get so lonely,  when I am  away

I count every moment, I wait every day,                      

 Until I am  home again and you hug me so tight                                                                     

That’s when I know Everything is alright.

 

Like a bird without wings that longs to be flying,

Like a motherless child left lonely and crying.

Like a song without words, like a world without music,

I wouldn’t know what to do I’d be lost without you watchin’ over me.

[Da da da da da repeated as beautiful harmony by George]

 

You’re my guardian angel; my light and my guide  

My hand on your shoulder and you by my side.

You make everything beautiful,   

You make me complete.

Everything in my world I lay at your feet..

 

Like a church with no steeple, where a bell never rings.  

In a town without people, where no voice in the choir ever sings.

If a boat on the ocean would be lost with no sail,

Then without your devotion

Surely all that I dreamed of would fail.

 

[Da da da da da repeated as beautiful harmony by George]

 

Like a church with no steeple, where a bell never rings.

In a town without people, where  no voice in the choir ever sings.

Copied from MetroLyrics.com


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